Depression/post-op blues - open for all

Layla

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Hello Tammii,
I'm sorry you're struggling with anxiety and feelings of isolation. Consider easing back into socializing as isolation may only increase your depression.

You could begin by inviting a friend over to your parents for coffee and a dessert. Or meet someone for coffee for a predetermined and manageable amount of time you're both agreeable to. Another idea, ask someone to go shopping, or for a walk. You could invite a friend to go to a movie where there would be a little socializing, but mainly quiet time as you watched a movie together. You could take a class with others affording you the opportunity to strike up a conversation with another who's sharing the common interest of the class you're participating in together.

There are many things you could do for short periods of time to ease back into a social life. You may feel uncomfortable and find a need to push yourself initially, but I'm sure after a few get-togethers with friends your comfort level will return.

As far as being worried about people bumping into you while out, use a cane as you ease back into navigating the world outside. People automatically steer clear of those relying on an assistive device. I'm sure after a time your confidence will increase and you'll lay it aside with the realization you don't need it.

Baby Steps. Please take them though and don't isolate yourself. You'll be glad you ventured out.

Wishing you confidence and peace of mind. :console2:
@Tammii1981
 

Janea2020

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I am currently 5 weeks post op and the one thing I was not prepared for was the emotional, mental and spiritual journey I was going to go through. I've been suffering for 12 years due to a car accident and I had 2 other surgeries on the same hip. Finally at 40 years old they were willing to replace it. The fear leading up to the replacement was unparallel but I was in good hands. I knew God had orchestrated my steps. But afterwards the depression of being in pain and losing my independence was overwhelming. I'm proud to say I'm finally in a positive place it took lots of prayer, reading and support. I'm ready to be totally self-sufficient but I also understand it will take time.
 

Jaycey

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@Janea2020 Welcome to BoneSmart! Yes, this surgery hits both physically and emotionally. But it sounds like you have turned the corner and are headed in the right direction. Well done!

Why don't you start a thread of your own in the hip recovery area? We would love to hear your story.
 

Dee62

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Hi

I'm 3 weeks and 4 days post RTHR.

I suffer a little with anxiety and panic attacks since a late miscarriage in 1986.

On Tuesday 2nd June I slipped on a very low kerb and fell heavily onto my right hip and snapped off the neck of femur. I was kept in hospital and had a THR the next morning.

I stayed in hospital for 4 days because my BP was low, then returned home on 6th June.

On the Monday after, I got a text from my gp surgery saying there was a prescription for me. I wasn't expecting anything as I brought meds home from the hospital, so I called them. They said it was for cream to put in my nostrils as I'd tested positive for MRSA! That was the first I knew of it. I duly used the cream as directed for 5 days and have had no follow up.

Last Monday, 22nd June, my gp called to say that they want me to have x rays to see if I have osteoporosis as I was young to have broken such a large bone. I've never broken a bone before and no history in our family of osteoporosis.

Last Thursday, 25th June, in the evening I noticed my operated calf and both ankles looked a little puffy. I had walked a bit more, I'd done some ironing and it was very hot too, so assumed it was probably that. On Friday morning it still looked a little puffy, and although I'd been told to expect it and read the same, I decided to call gp to check, as I have no contact with ant physiotherapists. I was asked to measure and photograph my calves, which were 13" good side, 13.5" operated side. They asked me to go for a d dimer blood test and by 5pm they called to say I needed to change from fragmin to rivaroxaban and go for a scan on Wednesday. Long story short as it's in my post on main forum, rivaroxaban made me sick so am now on treatment dose of fragmin until Wednesday. I measured my legs again on Friday evening and both measured 13", and have done since. I have a little pain very low down and more inner calf on operated side, but it feels muscular. At the moment no redness etc.

So, consequently this has all made my anxiety levels rocket and I feel so miserable. It seems to be one thing after another. I miss my 2 mile morning walks with our dog, when I would call my mum every day (I still do), and enjoy my walk in the local park.

Can anybody identify with this? I feel helpless, tearful, scared. I wonder if in part it's because it wasn't a planned operation, so was a huge shock to my system and I'm finding it hard to come to terms with.

Sorry to be such a moaning Minnie, but it helps to get it out in the open.

Dee
 

Jaycey

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@Dee62 I can totally identify with your experience.

In July 2016 I went into the hospital for a "routine" angiogram. Since I have a family history of heart problems I really wasn't all that worried about the test. I thought the test went well but in the recovery room the consultant said I needed an urgent procedure and stents put in one artery. He said I could not go home and he could not give me any idea of when I would have the procedure.

Seven days later I was transferred (by ambulance) to another hospital. The next day I had the procedure and stayed one night.

Once I was home I felt exactly as you describe - helpless, tearful, scared and in shock. Since that time I have discussed this with several people with similar experiences. All say this is a form of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

I'm not medically qualified to say your situation might be the same but it sure sounds like the shock of your fall and unexpected surgery is very similar. Have you thought about talking to someone about this? I do know that several of our members experienced PTSD post joint replacement even though it was a planned procedure.

We are all looking for some type of "normal" these days. The good news for you is that you will indeed get back to those long walks that you love. Just give that yourself time to heal and recover physically and mentally.
 

Hip4life

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@Dee62 My heart goes out to you. Having suffered on occasion from depression and anxiety myself, you are not alone. If we can’t help one another in times like this one, when can we? We always want to make sure if it doesn’t improve in a reasonable amount of time, that you talk with a professional. However, talking with a trusted friend or people who can relate can do wonders. Sometimes it is hard to express this with family because you already feel as if you have put enough on their shoulders. But the fear and anxiety and sadness are real.
I have had my share of scary physical events happen. It is frightening when you don’t have much control and feel so vulnerable. There is a certain amount of grief that goes in the mix as well, even if we’re not conscious of it. Allow yourself to cry and experience whatever you need to to get you to the other side. My husband has learned and taught our now grown children that I just need to do that without him trying to “fix” it. Very sensitive people can experience even normal events on a whole different level. Imagine what you need to do with the unexpected, traumatic things. Like Jaycey said, you just need to give yourself all the time you need and know you will get back to those things that make life joyful again. We’ll be here if you need us. ❤ Pat.
 

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