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Celle

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We've been talking to you for some time, but it seems no one has asked you this:

Please will you tell us the full date of your hip replacement and which hip it is, so we can make a signature for you? Knowing the exact date will help us to advise you appropriately in the future, because we'll be able to see your surgery date in the signature every time you make a post..
Thank you.:flwrysmile:
 
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@[email protected]

We've been talking to you for some time, but it seems no one has asked you this:

Please will you tell us the full date of your hip replacement and which hip it is, so we can make a signature for you? Knowing the exact date will help us to advise you appropriately in the future, because we'll be able to see your surgery date in the signature every time you make a post..
Thank you.:flwrysmile:
Hi Celle, I responded earlier to someone who asked me the same question. Right Hip as described in my initial post, July 20, 2020. Three weeks and 1 day ago :) Tks
 

Layla

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When the therapist I had on Friday came by and asked how I was doing, the one I had today said "You hurt him" to which she replied, "I kinda figured I might have" and "maybe we pushed it a little too far
A great example of not doing anything you’re not sold on, or allowing them to push you beyond your comfort level. Good for you holding your ground, Resolute Rob! :yay:
A great week to you. :wave:
 
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When the therapist I had on Friday came by and asked how I was doing, the one I had today said "You hurt him" to which she replied, "I kinda figured I might have" and "maybe we pushed it a little too far
A great example of not doing anything you’re not sold on, or allowing them to push you beyond your comfort level. Good for you holding your ground, Resolute Rob! :yay:
A great week to you. :wave:
haha Tks Layla...I was actually a bit surprised that the my therapist called the other one out like that and she didn't seem to mind. Almost like they get trophy's or add a notch on their belts for breaking people.
 

zauberflöte

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@[email protected] this is a very busy thread!!

Your description of that quad pain brought back a memory which I'd filed under "don't need to remember"! I had that with right hip, and may have with left as well. Like a charlie horse.
Your PT sounds absolutely bonkers! I am glad you are advocating for yourself. I did in-home PT for a few weeks with #1, but none at all with #2 except ankle pumps for circulation and glute squeezes because it felt good. Your ROM is in there, but causing more pain and swelling will not coax it out at all!
hahaha. By busy do you mean unorganized? Being a newby to this it's often difficult to find out if someone posted in response to my original post or just liked one of the responses. Needless to say, Yes, that pain can go away and never come back. It's horrific. So I'm guessing you didn't real any different having completed no organized PT with #2 than you did with #1 or was there difference that you had to work out over time? Tks
Lol no, I meant lots of posts in a short timeframe!

There is no significant functional difference between my hips. But the second one felt better and stronger faster. And I could do other things with my time than that pesky PT. So, no, there has been no "difference that I've had to work out". They each have their own problems, but I'm 68 and tend to ask the hips to do stuff that would be way easier on 38-yr-old soft tissue. (she says as she sits tailor-fashion on the floor stretching the outer hips....)
 

Mojo333

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Be ever mindful of the PTs directives. You are the best judgement if what is helping and what is hurting.
Slow and steady does win this race and the next session doesn't always need to be a Progression of the last one.
You can always get a slight cough...or mumble something about being nauseated if they get too rambunctious.:heehee:
They might not want to get so "hands on"
 
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@[email protected] this is a very busy thread!!

Your description of that quad pain brought back a memory which I'd filed under "don't need to remember"! I had that with right hip, and may have with left as well. Like a charlie horse.
Your PT sounds absolutely bonkers! I am glad you are advocating for yourself. I did in-home PT for a few weeks with #1, but none at all with #2 except ankle pumps for circulation and glute squeezes because it felt good. Your ROM is in there, but causing more pain and swelling will not coax it out at all!
hahaha. By busy do you mean unorganized? Being a newby to this it's often difficult to find out if someone posted in response to my original post or just liked one of the responses. Needless to say, Yes, that pain can go away and never come back. It's horrific. So I'm guessing you didn't real any different having completed no organized PT with #2 than you did with #1 or was there difference that you had to work out over time? Tks
Lol no, I meant lots of posts in a short timeframe!

There is no significant functional difference between my hips. But the second one felt better and stronger faster. And I could do other things with my time than that pesky PT. So, no, there has been no "difference that I've had to work out". They each have their own problems, but I'm 68 and tend to ask the hips to do stuff that would be way easier on 38-yr-old soft tissue. (she says as she sits tailor-fashion on the floor stretching the outer hips....)
Ahhh got it. Interesting to hear that no PT resulted in the feeling of a better stronger hip sooner. I wonder why some OS's insist on PT and others are dead set against it.
 
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Be ever mindful of the PTs directives. You are the best judgement if what is helping and what is hurting.
Slow and steady does win this race and the next session doesn't always need to be a Progression of the last one.
You can always get a slight cough...or mumble something about being nauseated if they get too rambunctious.:heehee:
They might not want to get so "hands on"
Hahaha thanks for the recommendation. I prefer to simply tell them that I'm not doing that or they aren't either. Whether they like it or not doesn't bother me in the least.
 

Eman85

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I almost wonder if they charge for different things they do during sessions with patients meaning the more they do the more they charge insurance. I sure hope that isn't the case but needless to say, that definitely will not be happening to me. At least not until I get an explanation and approval from my surgeon.
[/QUOTE]
I think you're starting to understand more about the healthcare system. It really doesn't have as much to do with healthcare as it does billing.
 
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Alright guys, thought I would provide a quick update since you all have been so helpful. Looks like I may be in the clear. Had a great PT session today and even though the PT did stretch my leg a bit, she told me it was simply to loosen up the knots and cramped muscles and allow me to return to my normal gait as I'm still slightly shifting when I step onto my surgical leg. And guess what, I was much more relaxed than last time and no pain!!!

Also, because I was in bad shape for a long time prior to surgery I developed a pretty severe limp. If anyone has any tips/tricks for getting back to normal without having to resort to the cane I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you,

Rob
 

Elf1

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Glad your PT went better today. As far as limp goes it's usually recommended to use some sort of assistive device until you get it cleared up. Some of the folks here used hiking polls, think @leejaa is one.

Also be really mindful when walking, practice doing heel/toe. Start with your heel on the ground and roll onto your toes to push off. It does take concentration to do it right. You may also want to start with smaller steps then normal to help it along.
 

leejaa

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I used both the cane and then I got some hiking/tracking poles. I used the cane for short walks around the house and stores if I went in but the hiking poles for longer walking around. You can of course use these anywhere. I found with two poles my walking was more balanced and it was easier to walk heel/toe heel/toe. Also gives your arms some exercise. I bought mine on Amazon for about $20 to try out and never found a need to get a more expensive set. I still use them for walking on uneven ground especially since I have fields in my backyard and even when I go swimming in my pond (muddy rocky entry and exit).
 
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Glad your PT went better today. As far as limp goes it's usually recommended to use some sort of assistive device until you get it cleared up. Some of the folks here used hiking polls, think @leejaa is one.

Also be really mindful when walking, practice doing heel/toe. Start with your heel on the ground and roll onto your toes to push off. It does take concentration to do it right. You may also want to start with smaller steps then normal to help it along.
Thank you so much. I appreciate that. Had my daughter watch me and she said it almost looks as if I'm walking wearing a shoe on 1 foot and nothing on the other or like my surgery leg is longer which may slightly be the case but regardless, I still need to practice the good habits you mentioned. Thanks again.
 
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I used both the cane and then I got some hiking/tracking poles. I used the cane for short walks around the house and stores if I went in but the hiking poles for longer walking around. You can of course use these anywhere. I found with two poles my walking was more balanced and it was easier to walk heel/toe heel/toe. Also gives your arms some exercise. I bought mine on Amazon for about $20 to try out and never found a need to get a more expensive set. I still use them for walking on uneven ground especially since I have fields in my backyard and even when I go swimming in my pond (muddy rocky entry and exit).
Tks Leejaa. Never thought about using anything other than the cane but with almost everything I've done thus far being geared strictly towards my surgical side, I would imagine using the poles might help me improve both sides considering my left is bad as well. Thanks for the input!
 

Layla

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Hey there, :wave:
I found the heel-toe walking helped immensely. I really had to focus mentally as I engaged because it felt foreign to me and took concentration. It did make me feel as though my gait was stronger and I was walking taller.
I hope this Thursday is a good one for you!
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@leejaa Waaa! I want my own pond to swim in! Lol. Back to the subject at hand: I also had developed a bad limp quite a while before surgery (people said I made them hurt). That’s just what your body does to compensate for the pain but it is challenging to relearn your gait. Some of it is still discomfort and stiffness and some of it is weakness. The assistive devices help with those by taking some of the work load off those still healing tissues while you’re building the strength and stamina back. Like the wise ones above said: the heel-toe concentrated effort is the best to get back to that normal gait. A shortened stride is another issue. As the hip got more comfortable, I could relax again into a full stride. How different that also felt. Also be aware of any other weird “habits” you might have gotten into. I was curling my toes under on the operated foot when I had shoes on. How long had I been walking like that? :shrug: Keep on keepin’ on. Sounds like you’re doing great.
 
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Hey there, :wave:
I found the heel-toe walking helped immensely. I really had to focus mentally as I engaged because it felt foreign to me and took concentration. It did make me feel as though my gait was stronger and I was walking taller.
I hope this Thursday is a good one for you!
@[email protected]
Tks Layla, I've been doing just that and even had my daughter watch me and she said it is helping a ton. I will admit, it is a little foreign considering I don't normally walk like that but will definitely continue to practice if it makes things better for me in the end. Thanks for all your help.

Rob
 
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@leejaa Waaa! I want my own pond to swim in! Lol. Back to the subject at hand: I also had developed a bad limp quite a while before surgery (people said I made them hurt). That’s just what your body does to compensate for the pain but it is challenging to relearn your gait. Some of it is still discomfort and stiffness and some of it is weakness. The assistive devices help with those by taking some of the work load off those still healing tissues while you’re building the strength and stamina back. Like the wise ones above said: the heel-toe concentrated effort is the best to get back to that normal gait. A shortened stride is another issue. As the hip got more comfortable, I could relax again into a full stride. How different that also felt. Also be aware of any other weird “habits” you might have gotten into. I was curling my toes under on the operated foot when I had shoes on. How long had I been walking like that? :shrug: Keep on keepin’ on. Sounds like you’re doing great.
This is great info. My PT said the same yesterday. Actually exactly what she said was, I can see you're still wobbling a little and I didn't think I was at all. But I do admit I was walking what I would consider lazily, if that's a word. Basically just strolling and not concentrating at all. When I asked if I needed to use the cane she insisted, short stuff around the house, no but anything a little longer and away from the home, definitely. 1 to ensure I had support in the event I needed it and 2, to ensure I had something to help me walk properly. I will continue to focus heel-to-toe from here forward. Only downside is, I still have a bad left hip that isn't quite at the surgery point so I'm dealing with that in everything I do as well. Tks again for writing.

Rob
 

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