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TKR oregonlass post TKR - bionic accomplished

sistersinhim

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I remember those! What a good idea. When my knee was 2 years old, we had a terrible cold spell with snow here in Virginia. The temps were in the negative with the wind. I had to clear a walking path and before I got back inside the knee started yelling. It took a couple of hours before it settled down. I had on long johns beneath my sweat pants, but that cold still got through all the way to the implant. That was a lesson learned. Your leg warmers are a wonderful idea to help everyone with not having to go through that.
 

Jockette

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At more than 3 years post op my knee still doesn’t like cold weather.
 
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oregonlass

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Update on Leg Warmers - you may want to order some!!!! Like many, I've had muscle pain above and below the knee as well as the back of the knee. My PT explained that all of those surrounding muscles get traumatized with the surgery.
The warmer keeps them warm...and more relaxed. The tightness is reduced, pain gone!
Normally, sciatica wakes me in the morning up my surgery side hip to my lower back. This morning it was maybe a 1 on the pain scale. I didn't limp when I got up. Still no feeling of tightness or pain in the surrounding knee muscles.
I think it may partly be the inner suede pad that is affixed to the inside of the warmer.
If you are healing, have any arthritis, etc. I can't recommend you try these enough. Best $20 I ever spent and of course, Amazon guarantee.
 

Cococay

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You mentioned having gait issues believed to be from your knee-causing sciatica , I am in the same situation. The constant limping has caused the opposite side to have sciatica. I guess I never thought to much about fixing it. Just figured when my knee is replaced everything would even out so to speak. Did you have to see anyone specific to help you manage that or was it lumped in as part of your overall recovery?
It does make trying to walk harder that’s for sure- but I’m hopeful hearing that you have done so well and are able to walk aligned now. Thank you for sharing that.
 
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oregonlass

oregonlass

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@Cococay I still have days or moments when the sciatica tries to kick up. A doctor didn’t diagnose it. When it kicked up last summer I went to the orthopedic clinic and they suggested PT as my surgeon was still on furlough. The PT watched me walk and immediately said it was my knee affecting my gait and causing the issue. I selected this clinic because the staff all got 5 star ratings. I know why now. They aren’t all about a workout like at the orthopedic onsite clinic. They listen, watch and get your feedback to make a plan. Aaron did this on every visit. He used my feedback to assess how to work with the sciatic.
He taught me some gentle stretches that are very effective. I’ve since had other tell me they had been suggested to them also.
It takes time and I think him watching me move and working in front of a wall of mirrors helped a lot. Get referrals or read reviews and find yourself a good one...and let your surgeon or doctor know to get it on your records and covered by insurance.
The one exercise I still do daily...and you can do it whenever the back wants to pull is to sit feet and knees apart. Support your upper body with hands on your knees and lean forward. Lower one hand at a time to the ground so you are leaning forward with hands dangling or on the floor. Then sit back up the same way you went down...one hand shifting to a knee at a time. This supports your back. I repeat the move 10 times. It’s not a race. Take it slow and easy. To start with I did this several times a day and you can feel the back relax a little. I still do it whenever I feel the twinges.
When he had me start with short walks outdoors, I used a pair of walking sticks. They made me think about my posture and alignment. They also gave my back a tiny bit of support. As that got easier and I got stronger, I graduated to one stick and then very slowly finally left it at home. I walk every day - although know there may be days to miserable to be outdoors. So I’ll find ways to keep moving in the house.
Aaron’s goal was that I would not have to keep with the exercises, but I’m not there yet.
With a bad knee or post surgery we tend to not let our lateral hip swing to go a freely or completely to the bad side. We may not realize we are even doing it. The body knows and someone watching you that knows what to look for can see it.
You can find a lot on sciatica online, but I found a lot of disagreement about what exercises to do for it. Really glad I researched and found a good therapist. Don’t hesitate to ask if they have success with sciatica in their clinic and whose the best at it. You deserve that.
 

Cococay

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Thank you!! I will try that exercise! It’s encouraging to hear how active you are!
 
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oregonlass

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@Cococay Hope your surgery goes well!!! I’ll be thinking of you.
Doing that exercise now, will help your body get through the surgery a bit easier. My PT told me the therapy and exercises ahead of time can make a big difference.
Everybody heals differently, listen to your body. They had me up and taking steps with a walker almost as quickly as I got to my room. You still have some anesthesia in you so it was surprisingly easy to do. And of course they are with you to make sure you don’t fall.
I had been told it was a more challenging process than a hip replacement. However, the tough part is maybe the first week or so and they gave me plenty of pain pills to keep me comfy.
Order yourself an assortment of tools to help the process. I saw the lounge doctor leg elevators on here and ordered the inflatable one since it was just for temporary use. It was great to get the leg elevated. My orthopedist included an ice machine in the package. I used it in the hospital and then brought it home. I used it a lot for the first few weeks.
If you like to be outdoors and don’t have gear to keep you warm, use recovery to get what you need. Implants don’t like the cold and will “yell” at you to do something.
Do your research now on who you want for PT so you can tell your doctor when you go in for pre-op. My orthopedic center gives a notebook full of info and it had a list of local PT. I used that plus google for reviews. No list? Just do a google search specific to knee replacement PT. Bonesmart has some good guidelines.
Take care and you’ll be feeling much better in just a few weeks.
 

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