• RATE YOUR SURGEON ON OUR NEW JOINT SURGEON LOCATOR

    Your opinion matters so please click on this announcement to find out how to rate the surgeons you have worked with

    You could also go to the Surgeon Locator via the blue nav bar at the top - find the tab "Surgeon Locator"

[THR] Going4fun new hip adventure

OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
Time for the nine-month update.

I last left off my story with a scary visit with my surgeon ... he had noticed some small movement of my device ... and he was worried that I was not as mobile as I wanted to be or as mobile as he had expected me to be. He recommended PT to stretch out my IT band (he doesn't usually recommend PT). At my first PT visit, after putting me through a series of tests, my PT sits down and almost rolls her eyes at my surgeon's diagnosis and suggestion. "This isn't an IT issue," she says. "Your gluteus medius is weak. I see this all the time after hip surgery. That's why you can walk up the stairs without problems but have trouble walking a good distance."

So, six months after surgery, I commenced PT with a series of exercises to strengthen my glute medius ... and within a week or so, my walking was much easier. I felt like I had jets on my behind powering me forward. But my activity ambitions are high (I want to swing dance and run and lift weighs) so I've continued with therapy and I'm reaching the end of my third month. I'm happy to report that I feel so much stronger physically and I've recovered full optimism about my hip recovery. My mood is great--didn't realize how worried I was until the worry left. I still get some soreness on the side of my hip. Last weekend, I danced for hours at a wedding reception. Came home took an Aleve and the next morning felt no pain. Less than a year ago, I danced for the last time before surgery, and I was in pain within an hour on the floor and could only hobble to my car at night's end. No hobbling last weekend after three hours of dancing.

In the past two weeks, I've been jogging outside ... slowly ... something I haven't done for maybe ten years. I had moved to the treadmill after my initial hip diagnosis. I love running intervals (mixing fast running and slow running and walking) on the treadmill, but running outside is a more meditative, soothing pleasure. And it's so much more time efficient. Don't have to drive to gym, walk to locker room, change, walk to exercise room ... walk back and all of that. Just throw on shorts and running shoes and head out the house.

Running outside is so much harder, more tiring ... and my hip is doing well. I went jogging this afternoon for about 30 minutes ... I stopped and walked some ... but my distance is getting greater week by week. I jog for 6 to 10 minutes ... then walk for a few minutes ... then jog again ... and so on.

Probably will do a few more weeks of PT for my hip and I want to continue at home with some of the exercises she gave me, because I sense how much stronger and more flexible I am. Among other exercises, my therapist has me doing lots of balance moves and moves with bands. The balancing moves are really helpful. One balance exercise is to stand on one leg on a foam pad (unstable and wobbly) ... and then holding a ball in my hand, write out in the air "in big letters" the alphabet from A to Z. All kinds of muscles get recruited, not just my glutes ... and I've noticed that my balance is so good when I jog ... I can stumble on uneven ground and quickly recover.

I totally buy the BS philosophy of not jumping into PT, but I was desperate ... and so was my surgeon. I think things turned out right by waiting for six months before doing PT. The soft tissue had healed a lot. There have been times when I worried I had overdone things in PT—joined the ODIC to use BS language. But then a week later, the soreness would be gone, and I would be able to do exercises that I previously could not--and do them more intensely. I might have a touch of trochanteric bursitis. I see my surgeon next week and will report the occasional soreness in the side. The good news is that the soreness occurs after higher and higher levels of activity.

My goal is to get back out there regularly dancing his summer--and also to get back to regular weightlifting. I think healing of the soft tissue is still taking place ... but I'm quite pleased about where I am right now. I now sometimes forget I had the surgery--and that is new. And when I'm sore, I more think of my side and my body as sore, not my (artificial) hip as sore. I've integrated the hip into my body awareness. It's no longer a foreign object inside of me.

Punchline: I have had a weak back for years and years ... and when I reported some problems with my recovery, my surgeon's nurse sent me to a physical medicine doctor to check out my back, to make sure that wasn't the problem. The physical med doctor did X-Rays ... and recommended PT for my back. He didn't think my back was involved in my hip complaints and when he tested my hip, he said it seemed really strong. So, I got two PT scripts (hip from surgeon--back from physical med guy) ... and some time in the next month, my PT will shift to a focus on my back. My therapist already has me doing some back strengthening, so we've sort eased into it.

Overall, I'm quite grateful ... I had great flexibility since day one ... and I'm beginning to exercise in a more serious way, which is why I had the surgery. Of course, I'm carrying extra maturity (years) and extra weight since I got my diagnosis. I'm determined to be patient as I try be a highly active and fit 57-year-old. I'm in touch online with runners who've had hip replacement and most report that it took 15 to 18 months to really feel great at running. And some report the improvement continues to 2 and 2.5 years.

I have never enjoyed PT in the past, but I looked closely at online reviews and picked a place with two incredibly sharp, flexible, warm therapists, one of whom is the owner. The owner and the other therapist are so nurturing and encouraging and unflappable. The place is so social. We patients talk to each other, discuss our conditions (the therapists can't reveal what condition any of us have) but we reveal our conditions to each other. Lots of laughter, encouraging each other. My therapist is so creative. I basically come in with a report ... I did X over the weekend ... felt Y ... and she continually adjusts my exercises and is always nearby watching me, making sure I'm doing the exercises in a way that will help the most. She has tested me twice so far ... She wants my hip flexors to get a bit stronger.

I see my surgeon for the nine-month appointment on Tuesday. Hopefully the device hasn't moved. I really don't think it has. I've had depression in my life, and exercise has always been great for my mind and my mood. I got the surgery in order to exercise again, which felt a little risky because my walking was mostly fine. Never had problems climbing the stairs or anything. Arrived at the OR walking fine ... the intake person assumed it was my sister, standing on a walker behind me, who was there for surgery, not me.

The intake woman and I had a good chuckle (my sister is now scheduled for hip replacement this summer). My surgeon had said he was comfortable operating as long as I was comfortable and insisted on the surgery. He thought I was a borderline case--in other words, he was not highly recommending the surgery. But if I wanted the surgery to be active and was clear about that (and I was!) and I knew the risks, he was comfortable with operating. I have sometimes joked with people that I had a “luxury” hip replacement: I had the surgery not just to regain basic daily function but to flourish. I’m not sure my surgeon would have operated on me 20 years ago, but hip surgeons have gained a lot more confidence since then. Oh, forgot to mention ... my surgeon places no restrictions on his patients. None! (His only suggestion is … if you weren’t doing a strenuous activity before surgery, be careful about starting it after surgery, and he doesn’t like to operate on people solely to help them run again, but he was totally into my desire to swing dance again without pain! That goal seemed to excite him.)

After surgery, my optimism and mood got tested when it took me nine weeks to walk without a cane (which doesn’t seem so bad at all now). And I got demoralized that walking beyond a mile or so was hard at month four and five and six (this really surprised and bothered my surgeon as well).

A few weeks into PT, once I sensed I was getting stronger and that my therapist wasn't going to injure me, I exhaled a deep sigh of relief. I'm still happily exhaling. Oh, the joy of movement, the joy of exercise. Freedom! The journey continues.
 
Last edited:

Layla

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
19,155
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Thanks for the update, Going4fun. Happy Nine Month Anniversary to you!
Hopefully you'll continue to notice progress over the next several months.

Wishing you a nice weekend and all the best with your appt on Tuesday.
Please update us on your OS's opinion regarding the movement he mentioned months ago.
@Going4fun
 
OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
Update after visit with surgeon--9 and 1/2 months.

Got great news today. My device is looking good--and my surgeon now thinks the device hasn't shifted or moved--which is what he had expressed worry about at my sixth-month appointment.

Well today, my surgeon had apparently checked his notes quite well ... because he entered the room ready to evaluate if my device had moved ... and he called up the x-ray from the day of surgery and compared it to today's x-ray ... and said the device hasn't shifted at all. He was thrilled, I have to say--as was I!

He said his original opinion (that the device might have slipped slightly) was more of an illusion/judgment call in how to read the X-ray and how to analyze the bone structure around my device.

I will continue to jog ... continue to build up my glute muscles in PT ... and head to the dance floor.
 
Last edited:

Layla

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
19,155
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Awesome news. I'm happy for you!
I recall your discouragement when your surgeon first suspected your implant had slipped.
It's not something you want to hear right after major surgery. Thankfully he misjudged.
I'll bet you feel like a weight was lifted. Now you'll be all the lighter on your feet on the dance floor.
Have fun! :happyfeet:
@Going4fun
 

SurreyGirl

post-grad
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
1,960
Age
59
Location
Surrey
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
What great news. You must be so happy! I agree that exercising and upping PT after six months seems to help. For me swimming has been brilliant and I love it. Both legs now working evenly and I can even frogkick.

Painfree mostly unless I overdo it but sailing again, dancing salsa and having a ball.

Re elastic bands for pt. I am still very nervous about this.
 
OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
Hi @SurreyGirl, yes, I'm really happy with the news from the surgeon. But honestly, a few weeks into PT, I experienced deep mental relief ... and as PT has continued and as I walk better and longer and faster ... it was just clear to me that the hip was OK ... and that my PT was most likely correct that the problems I've had were on account of a very weak gluteus medius. Some of the weakness is from the surgery, I imagine ... some of the weakness is because I dropped activity in the years before the surgery.

On the elastic bands, I wasn't crazy about them either. In fact, when I saw people doing those band side steps, I said to myself, "that's exactly what I do NOT want to do in PT. I bet that only exacerbates the pain."

Well, I use the elastic bands during each of my twice-a-week therapy sessions. I just trusted my therapist and decided to just follow her guidance and see ... and my hip was fine with the side steps using bands. We increased several levels ... ultimately to the black band ... and that was too much and I reported lingering soreness afterwards ... she immediately moved me back to the blue bands.

I really love my therapist ... and I trust her ... and that's so important. There have been times I've had some soreness and gotten frightened and she's said in her calm, reassuring way, Oh, you increased your activity, of course, you're going to have some soreness. Let's see how you feel in a few days ... and sure enough, the soreness goes away. And when I report higher soreness and pain, she immediately shifts away from the exercise that I think is too much.

Like you, I still overdo things ... I think that simply comes with the territory ... I try to remind myself that even when I overdo things ... I'm in much less pain ... than I was a year ago.

So you're a month away from your one-year mark! Sailing and Salsa ... that sounds like a great title for a rehab program right there!
 

SurreyGirl

post-grad
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
1,960
Age
59
Location
Surrey
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
Thanks! Yes all good and I danced, swam, snorkelled and sailed my way around the holiday this time! No pain which was fantastic.

Only hiccup was my legs were too weak to use fins for any length of time so scuba was out. But great progress and I had some very complimentary comments! Including how straight I was standing. The Leki stayed in the suitcase :)
 

SurreyGirl

post-grad
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
1,960
Age
59
Location
Surrey
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
Ps

“sailing and salsa” is a great title for my diary chapter! Thanks x
 
OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
First-year update ... (a few days ahead of time).

I'm writing this update early because I've got two super busy weeks coming up ... During one of those weeks, I'm going out of town to be with my sister, who is having bilateral hip replacement surgery. She really needs the surgeries and I'm proud that she's going forward. She came to be with me for my surgery, so I'm returning the support.

Well, it's been quite a journey. The bottom line is I can now move and exercise and walk in ways that I couldn't before the surgery. I see the surgery as quite a success.

My recovery had serious ups and downs and I hit multiple points when I was scared about the seemingly slow pace of recovery ... and I hit several points of despair.

My surgeon said his patients usually walk without any device ... 4 to 6 weeks out ... Well, took me 8 to 9 weeks. Looking back, I can't help but think I was making a big deal out of nothing. I recently had a friend who had the surgery with another prominent surgeon in my area ... who is known to have fast recoveries among patients. Her progression was pretty much at the same pace as mine. And my surgeon clears people for running and aggressive activity at three months ... and I foolishly took seriously an interview during which my surgeon said he thought serious runners could get back to running at 6 months. (Surgeons can be naive, I realize.) The runners I read about online say it takes way longer than that to feel really good running (15 to 18 months).

Low points:
Weeks 6 to 8 ... when I was right on the verge of being able to walk on a cane ... but couldn't seem to get there.

Months 3 to 6 ... saw gradual improvement ... still could easily cause major pain if I walked in the wrong way or just a bit too long ... I started aerobics (elliptical and treadmill) during this time ... and had to back off ... two or three times because of serious pain afterwards ... immediately afterwards ... and a day afterwards. There were points in here when I thought that my surgeon had botched my surgery.

Breakthrough:
PT at 6 months ... My surgeon has a BS policy ... don't worry about PT ... just walk ... But at six months, I was still not feeling as strong I thought I should feel ... What really bothered me was the way lifting my operated leg could set off knee pain and calf pain and tingling ... and I still couldn't walk more than a mile say without pain and weakness kicking in.

So, at the 6-month checkup, my surgeon recommended PT ... and I wanted PT. (There was a scare in here ... my surgeon thought the device might have slipped from his view of the X-Ray ... but he wasn't sure.) My surgeon's nurse had also set up an appointment with a Physical Medicine doctor regarding my back. She wondered if my back was affecting my recovery. The Phys Med doctor suggested PT for the back. So I arrived at PT with two scripts: for the hip and for the back (though hip was the most important for me).

During the in-take session, my PT rolled her eyes when I told her my surgeon thinks I might be having IT Band issues. She said I was clearly having problems because my gluteus medius, involved in propelling me forward, was inactive (not firing) and weak. I swear I felt my anxiety and fear drop about 50 percent when I met my PT and heard her diagnosis.

So twice a week, I arrived to PT and did a wide range of exercises ... a lot of them involved balancing myself on one leg ... there were times I got sore and I would report that to my PT ... She said there was going to be some soreness because muscles were waking up ... if I reported lingering pain ... she changed the exercises. Totally fell in (professional, platonic) love with my PT. Her confidence that I was going to get better and be able to run again ... just eased my worries so much.

It took about four months to get to the level of strength in my glutes that my PT thought I needed to get to in order to support safe running and dancing. And then we shifted more to back and core exercises ... though she had weaved in core exercises all along.

Finished 5 months of PT on August 21. Just to be clear, I had a long PT treatment because I was pretty ambitious in wanting to return to hard running on the treadmill and very fast social dancing, mainly Lindy-Hop (a playful, athletic form of swing dancing). If the goal had been simply to walk better, I could have stopped at probably two months.

Irony: I had been to PT two or three times before and I did not like it. Found the settings to be cold, sterile ... felt alone in my own little word. Well my PT's office is bright ... and my PT and her partner tell funny stories, share about themselves, take music recommendations ... talk about pop culture. And I had so many fun conversations and jokes with other patients. Lots of laughter in many sessions. I never knew patients could talk to each other during PT ... encourage each other ... laugh at each other's comments.

So ... I expect my leg to continue to get better. Lots of runners report improvements and feeling really comfortable at 15 months and even 18 months. And ... I can still overdo it! ... I did interval running (slow running punctuated by sprints) about 5 times over the past two weeks ... and yes, I ran faster than my body (lungs and leg) are ready for ... and I've had some minor soreness. Once I get on the treadmill, my mind goes through a time machine ... and suddenly I imagine (insanely) that I'm 27, not 57.

Overall, I'm quite pleased at my mobility and freedom to exercise and dance at this point. At my 9-month appointment (where my surgeon concluded that the new hip had NOT moved, as he worried about at the 6-month appointment) my surgeon said to remember that the artificial hip isn't as good as our natural hip.

"But my artificial hip is far better than the natural hip I had before surgery," I told him. I was nearly shouting.

"Yes," he said. He smiled, and I smiled.

My wisdom for others: don't buy the hype stories of those patients who ditched the walker and ditched the cane in three days. Those stories are not typical, far from it. I also say take as much time off work as you can. I got three months of paid leave ... and some extra time (on account of the Christmas/Holidays break) because I'm a teacher. Definitely call on your support network to encourage you. I'm single and I certainly went through periods of isolation. I was good at calling friends and coworkers and going out with them, for lunch and so on. And I got out the house to movies and lectures.

Let your surgeon take care of you, if you can. I called my surgeon's office at least three times during recovery ... and my surgeon's chief nurse was reassuring and sharp. Even if I could tell myself what the nurse told me, it's better to hear it from the nurse. If you decide to go for PT, be careful. I waited six months because I worried about injuring myself. And when I picked my PT (from google reviews, which were quite accurate), I arrived ready to quit and go to another PT if I didn't like her approach.

Knowing that I would quit with this person if I didn't like her approach ... really freed me up and shifted my mind away from the binary of PT/No PT to ... finding THE RIGHT PT. I literally had a list of other PT places I was going to call if I didn't like my PT. Thankfully, never needed to use that list.

I'll do PT exercises today ... and maybe go for a walk ... might do a slow run outside.
 
Last edited:

Layla

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
19,155
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hello @Going4fun
What a thorough but concise update of your first full year of recovery. You effectively covered 12 months while holding my interest. I have always enjoyed your writing style and sensible approach to healing. You've been a great supporter of others here and it's much appreciated. I remember your six month appt when your surgeon thought the device slipped. Thankfully all is well.

All the best to you moving forward and as you travel to be with your sister through her BTHR surgery and early days of recovery. Hopefully you can coax her into joining us. We'd love to support and encourage her as she's healing.

Hope to hear from you soon!
 

Debru4

graduate
Joined
Aug 11, 2018
Messages
710
Age
65
Location
Colorado
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Your sister is so lucky to have you to support her. I was fortunate in that a good friend of mine had had a hip replacement at age 16 and had 4 revisions in the subsequent years. So she'd had a ton of recovery experience. She offered to have me stay with her the first few days after my surgery, and was able to offer me lots of tips. In fact, hers had all been posterior so she was pretty awed at the minimal restrictions I had and how quickly I was able to get up and moving. But the moral support of others who know (like those on this forum) is such an advantage, as everything about a hip replacement is so unexpected and alien, for a first replacement at least. And even those who have had an previous replacement often have a different 2nd experience so the extra advice/comfort is always helpful!

I am curious about the return to hard running. At my one year follow up I asked my surgeon if I could return to white water rafting, given I've had back surgery and a hip replacement in the 10 years since I'd last rafted the more advance rapids. He said I probably could---that the main things they said to avoid were things like true running, volleyball, basketball---more high impact sports. Those weren't things I was interested in, and perhaps given the fact that I hadn't mentioned doing them before surgery or returning to them were the reason he mentioned them to avoid. Also, I am a bit older than you---I also was a teacher for 38 years---retired about 4 years ago, but was teaching when I had my back surgery 10 years ago. I too planned it up against a Christmas break, and did return 1/2 time after 4 weeks, as that was the amount of leave I had available, and being single, I preferred not to lose pay. However, had I needed more time, like you I could have, and would have taken more. I think listening to our bodies is critical.

And this.....my sentiments exactly!!!
Let your surgeon take care of you, if you can. I called my surgeon's office at least three times during recovery ... and my surgeon's chief nurse was reassuring and sharp. Even if I could tell myself what the nurse told me, it's better to hear it from the nurse. If you decide to go for PT, be careful. I waited six months because I worried about injuring myself. And when I picked my PT (from google reviews, which were quite accurate), I arrived ready to quit and go to another PT if I didn't like her approach.Knowing that I would quit with this person if I didn't like her approach ... really freed me up and shifted my mind away from the binary of PT/No PT to ... finding THE RIGHT PT. I literally had a list of other PT places I was going to call if I didn't like my PT. Thankfully, never needed to use that list.
Great update---here's to both of us continuing to improve in the months to come! :yes!:
 
OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
@Layla, thanks for your wisdom all along the process of my recovery. About bringing my sister to BS, well ... I'll mention the site to her.

@Debru4, on hard running and other activities. My surgeon is part of the Rothman Institute practice, which is big here in Pennsylvania and in parts of New Jersey. Apparently the practice collectively decided a few years back that there was little research evidence that restrictions of any kind (whether immediately after surgery, crossing legs, etc. or with exercise later) were needed or helpful. And at least one member of the practice, a nationally well known anterior approach surgeon (your man, Dr. H, @CricketHip), had stopped placing activity restrictions on patients going back at least a decade.

So, here's my understanding of the logic ... The major cause of hip failure in the past (I mean long-term failure, after 20 years and so on) was because particles from the device (from the head rubbing up against the acetabular liner) got into the bone and tissue and caused problems that led to the device unloosening from the bone. The technical name for this process is osteolysis. Well, with the use of ceramics and especially the cross-linked polyethylene liners, the amount of particles falling from the device has dramatically dropped. 'Almost no wear" is how my surgeon and another top surgeon described the research tracking hips with these new materials. Not zero wear ... but almost zero wear ... going on ten plus years ... and that includes studies of people people who were under 50 when they had the surgery.

One qualifier ... my surgeon doesn't "ban" but he does discourage people from taking up running if they didn't run before surgery.
 

Barbaraj

supremo
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
2,289
Age
69
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Whoa, what a great report, @Going4fun, so well written, and reassuring for so many folks who are earlier in the healing process and worried about how it will end up. And love the concise review of the various recovery stages. You are doing so well, really able to return to what you love. I wasn't a runner before surgery, and don't want to take it up now. But, I do want to be able to return to my gym rat habits regularly without discomfort and, at least for this latest hip, to be able to sit for more than 15 minutes without aching. I am going to get there, eventually. I am so glad that you have found PT to be a game changer for you--sounds like a wonderful therapist and a supportive, positive practice. Hurray! PT does get a lot of bad press on this forum, but when it's successful it really can help restore fully function, and definitely can be a terrific option for healing hipsters. Now, just get out there and LIVE! Best wishes! And you are a wonderful brother for supporting your sister with her upcoming surgery. One hip at a time was hard enough, but bilateral--she's going to need and will definitely appreciate your help and support.
 

CricketHip

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 12, 2015
Messages
3,009
Location
PA.
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@Going4fun You are a rock star!! You have overcome a lot of worries along your recovery and the key is you approaching things in a safe, educated way and now you are reaping the benefits. Congratulations!!
Dr H. of Rothman, my hero.. haha he did actually tell me not to try running.. but then again I have these shallow hip sockets.. I wasn't going to resume running anyway. I want to bike, hike, scuba dive, horseback ride and all of that is ok. :yahoo:
So happy to hear that your implant didn't slip.. best news of the day!
Best wishes to your sister, you will be so valuable to her in her recovery. :flwrysmile:
 

SurreyGirl

post-grad
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
1,960
Age
59
Location
Surrey
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
@CricketHip another scuba diver! I am aiming to get back to that too. Might need some modification re equipment porting and getting in and out of the boat but will get there! I hopefully will be celebrating my 60th somewhere appropriate for this.

@Going4fun I loved your 12 month summary and interesting about the PT . I may take it up again as a few things still need sorting and it might help. :)
 

CricketHip

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 12, 2015
Messages
3,009
Location
PA.
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@SurreyGirl - I figure all will be fine with diving except I may slip out of my BC at the boat ladder and let the crew hoist it into the boat.
@Going4fun I may do a bit of PT in another month. Would be nice to co-ordinate strengthening my back along with my legs.
I may ask you who you used, they sounded great! :) :-) (:
 
OP
OP
Going4fun

Going4fun

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
398
Age
57
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
@CricketHip I can make a recommendation for sure ... several of them ... send me a PM if you want. I have to say: google reviews were dead-on about my PT. My PT and her partner were great ... and great about the psychology of healing. I have to say ... I felt my anxiety plummet after starting PT. All the worry about recovery ... just scattered and ran once I concluded my PT knew what she was doing.
 

Debru4

graduate
Joined
Aug 11, 2018
Messages
710
Age
65
Location
Colorado
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Thanks for the clarification about the running/impact sports. Makes perfect sense to me---and as @Barbaraj said, I don't see myself taking up volleyball or running, (or even her serious gym rat routines) :nah:but I am eager to get back to mountain hiking, white water rafting perhaps, and even the ability to go to a Water Park or boating and not worry the water/bouncing will damage something.

I had another positive experience with my PT today. At my first session I mentioned multiple things I'd like to work on, in addition to my knee, knowing the knee was the top priority. Today was only my 3rd session, but I realize that each week he has gradually added things on to address the other areas as well---no prompt from me.....just being a good listener and knowing all the body systems work together. So far a reasonable, actually rather small number of stretches and exercises are addressing the knees, hips, legs, back, core, AND balance. All in a manageable amount of time---very impressive to me. :yay:
 

SurreyGirl

post-grad
Joined
Nov 25, 2016
Messages
1,960
Age
59
Location
Surrey
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
@CricketHip yup, I am going to pay for a one to one so that someone looks after me and will hand up the bcd before climbing the ladder. Are you worried about the Giant Stride causing dislocation?

So @Going4fun I didn’t mean to hijack the thread!!
 

Corey W

junior member
Joined
Jun 26, 2019
Messages
63
Age
55
Location
NW Chicago suburbs
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
@Going4fun I just read your thread and I really appreciate the timeline and your journey. I am experiencing the highs and lows, wondering if my new hip is loose, and getting hella inpatient. Landing in the ODIC is humbling and I want OUT! I am really interested in the running and when and how your progress goes. Thanks for the advice and wisdom...hoping I can follow it:fingersx:
 

BoneSmart #1 Best Blog

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
48,520
Messages
1,329,959
BoneSmarties
30,674
Latest member
GermanQueen
Recent bookmarks
0

Top Bottom