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[THR] Diary of my journey to happy times

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Recovery Area' started by Klassy, Dec 14, 2018.

  1. SurreyGirl

    SurreyGirl post-grad

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    So glad those suggestions helped. The sheepskin suggestion was from someone else in here so I passed it on as helped me too!

    Ps I think it is ok to have that dose of co codamol 4 hours apart so one taken before bed and one at night if you wake up in the early hours and need it might be enough.

    I now have one emergency codeine pill left but have been using the co codamol if I really have to. Most of the time, if at all, I use paracetemol only.

    I think Josephine did say that medication was sometimes needed beyond 6 weeks so you are in very early days re medication!
     
  2. Layla

    Layla FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Please don't feel like a wimp for taking it slow. You're only 18 days out of a major surgery. You're approach to recovery is wise. If you continue to suffer pain or discomfort speak to your GP about your prescription.
    I hope you're having a nice weekend so far.
    A wonderful Sunday to you!
    @Klassy
     
  3. oregonlass

    oregonlass junior member

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    @SurreyGirl, I had realised you only got the single room in NHS by good chance, and after a day in recovery room waiting for a bed at all. I was told by NHS that if I got lucky I might end up in the same private hospital that I paid for, free on NHS, because they used it when the queues got too long. But I didn’t take that gamble.

    I’ve just been on page 10 of your blog and read that you had a 3 year wait from diagnosis of bone on bone to op. What the...?!! How did that happen? I’ll now stop feeling aggrieved about the 15 month estimated that my wait would have been![/QUOTE]

    My husband is from UK (I’m US), and we frequently have health care discussions and the differences. I had wondered how long the waits were there for the NHS care. Wow. Know my US system isn’t “free” but at 65+ I have both national and supplemental insurance. So while I have a small out of pocket annual, all my care is covered.

    Time frame? Diagnosis: Oct 2018. Surgery December 10, 2018. .... You guys using NHS are tough. I don’t know how I would have dealt with your time frame and only OTC pain meds... and those are generally milder here in US than there in UK.... iE: ibuprprophen + codine is RX in US but OTC in UK.

    In the orthopedic wings here they have all gone single rooms to minimize the patient picking up or sharing germs with another person. They get you out as quick as they can - normally 1-2 days not because they don’t want you...but again to minimize exposure to “sick” people in the hospital.

    I am part of a study being done jointly with Medicare and orthopedic surgeons to maximize client outcome and minimize risk of problems like infection. A charge nurse interfaces with my orthopedic team. I have support numbers I can call 24x7 to avoid calling 911. Only call emergency for the dire stuff like high fever, possible blood clot, etc.
    It’s part of a “Bundled Payment and Service Delivery Model”. Goal (so they say) is to improve patient care. It says the goals are to get all parts of your medical team to work together (novel idea) to enhance care and outcomes...Interestingly, the doctors may get extra reimbursement for better patient coordinated care and outcomes.

    I was concerned about it but have found no negatives so far. Nurse is very concerned but overloaded with cases. Never the less...she always gets back to me if I have a question. Have not had to call doctor’s office, but interaction with that team has been stellar.

    Picking a surgeon was a challenge. My doctor referred me to the Orthopedic Medical Center, (highly rated and member of BoneSmart.). I had to try and pick a doctor. Get as much info as you can. Scheduler was shocked when I told her I was looking at reviews of the doctors. I picked one that I liked the reviews/outcomes on and then also talked with a couple of surgical nurses during my initial education.
    Orthopedic nurses are a great resources. Every one I spoke to said they don’t see my doc’s patients back in the hospital for “fixes.” Who would they send their friends/family to is a great question if you get the chance. Feeling very lucky with my choice and the outcome so far.
     
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  4. Klassy

    Klassy senior
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    @oregonlass, 2 months from diagnosis to op is amazing. I do feel a bit resentful about going private. There are other things I could spend £10,500 on. But it’s not a big sum considering all the expertise and equipment, so I try to think how lucky I am to have that money to spend. A lot of people don’t, and they do languish on the waiting list for what is called “elective surgery”. As if wanting to be able to walk half a mile without pain is like wanting a prettier nose.

    I can see the point about avoiding infection, but I couldn’t have coped with going home in 1-2 days. They pretty much had to prise me out on Day 3!

    Anyway here we both are 19 days along and both happy with outcome, which is wonderful.

    I hope you have the night pain under control and have a good night’s sleep tonight.
     
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  5. oregonlass

    oregonlass junior member

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    @Klassy - Elective my posterior. Nothing elective about being able to get around and work. I was in UK for 3 weeks last summer and it was daunting...all those steep, narrow stairs. Not my favorite vacation memories. I also wonder how the delay impacts the person’s personal strength and health as that will impact post surgery. Almost immediately on diagnosis they put me on home exercises to strengthen all the core muscles, legs and arms. So I was in better shape than before.

    There are some people they keep for 3 days. It all depends on the patient and the doctor. In class they did mention that people who didn’t want to be awakened often had more problems the next morning as the pain would be accelerated and the patient not able to do the physical therapy. In the “group PT” class I was in there was 1 hip, me, 3 double knees and 2 single knees. I think the knees all stayed longer.
    Also, I had a spinal and that makes a difference. Here they use an addition to the block that has a time delayed release that starts to dissipate on days 3-4. So I felt actually “better” before that wore off :0
    But by then I was snugged in at home.
     
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  6. Klassy

    Klassy senior
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    Day 19 and all is well. I am doing tasks ok with one crutch, even managed to tidy kitchen, but use 2 crutches to walk for exercise. We took another trip to the coast and I walked from car park to coffee shop, about 15 minutes (or about 3 minutes for a normal person!). H reconnoitred and reported that the seating wasn’t suitable, which was a pity, it would have been nice to take a break there. I only managed part way back before I began to feel some pain, so H fetched the car. I think I have dodged ODIC.

    @oregonlass, yes there are some steep stairs here in UK. Though the stairs in our house are nothing compared to places I’ve stayed on holiday in Paris and Amsterdam, basically a ladder not a staircase! But perhaps you were referring to sightseeing in medieval buildings? My hobby is ringing church bells, and they are mostly up 50 or more steep, crumbling, stone spiral steps, with no hand rail. On a bad day I’d be going up on all fours, and coming down backwards. I think it will take a while before I can get up a tower again, but hoping that once the hip is fully healed it will be much better than pre op.

    On the other hand, thinking about possible drawbacks to some parts of the US, we don’t usually get much if any snow and ice here in SouthEast. If any serious winter weather arrives, I won’t be venturing out at all.
     
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  7. Layla

    Layla FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Look at how far we come after all that nonsense. I can't tell you how many times I laughed at my pathetic self pre-op. Most likely to keep from crying :bawl:
    I'm so thankful for this second chance. I'm sure you are also.
    Roll on great days, I love every single one of them! :happydance:
    @Klassy
     
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  8. oregonlass

    oregonlass junior member

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    Rainy day here in Oregon...but I did my liesure in house loops and totaled up just over 1/2 mile In steps without triggering any discomfort. In fact, the gentle short frequent walks seem to loosen things up and keep the hip/back more comfy.

    Weather is a huge problem in many parts of the US... it’s just so spread out. Where I am in Oregon is probably a bit more like southern England. Pacific Northwest shares the rains you get there in UK. Mostly a little warmer in winter and summer here than there. Rains are more seasonal - not year around which would eliminate our forest fire damage but not the way the gulf stream works.

    I’m a disaster on crutches so using a walker instead. PT said to bring my cane next week so that would be liberating. I find I’m puttering in my kitchen more where the galley makes a natural easy to negotiate work area. It seems to be making me stronger and more sure footed...very carefully. I can tell the hip isn’t quite ready and not pushing it.
     
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  9. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    The sheepskin is what kept my nights manageable.
    All of me just felt hypersensitive for the first months.
    A wrinkle in the sheets could drive me nuts. Heard Layla call it the Princess and the Pea syndrome.
    Hang in there @Klassy
    This recovery journey will lead to a great year ahead...
    Bells will be ringing....:egypdance:
     
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  10. oregonlass

    oregonlass junior member

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    @oregonlass, yes there are some steep stairs here in UK. Though the stairs in our house are nothing compared to places I’ve stayed on holiday in Paris and Amsterdam, basically a ladder not a staircase! But perhaps you were referring to sightseeing in medieval buildings? My hobby is ringing church bells, and they are mostly up 50 or more steep, crumbling, stone spiral steps, with no hand rail. On a bad day I’d be going up on all fours, and coming down backwards. I think it will take a while before I can get up a tower again, but hoping that once the hip is fully healed it will be much better than pre op.

    @Klassy Wow - that’s some hobby!!!! I have never liked heights, steep or edges since I was a small girl. I’ll leave the bell ringing to you my friend. Being from US west coast, we just don’t have the castles, manors or ancient church buildings here. On my first trip to the east coast I was enamored with stone buildings that were from the 1800s. Coming abroad was absolutely mind expanding and I relish every visit. So looking forward to being able to do the needed walking for proper touring.
    I shall also make a point of remembering to check out “stairs” on all potential stop-overs. Ladders would NOT be my thing ;)
     
  11. Klassy

    Klassy senior
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    Hi @oregonlass , I hope you’re having a good day. We have a lot in common I think, even our style of username, mine is K for the county of Kent + lassy.

    I too don’t like heights. I find a stone spiral staircase is ok, though hard on a dodgy hip, because the way it bends round means you can only see a few steps at a time. Just once in a while we visit another tower which has a freestanding metal spiral, so you can see over the railing to the surrounding void, and also through the metal grid under your feet, gulp. That gets the adrenalin going. And ringers do occasionally go out on a tower roof to sightsee, but I’ll be the one hanging well back from the parapet.

    Yes short walks and often are working for me too. If I’m watching TV on a commercial station (and I’ve watched more in the last two weeks than in the previous two years) I get up for a wander every ad break. Half a mile is a good tally. Do you use a Fitbit or similar to count steps?

    And we too have a galley kitchen, which as you say is handy for getting around. I think the big advantage of a walker is that it would stand politely and wait for you, yes? I’m always looking for somewhere to prop my crutches, and they often make a break for freedom. If they get their act together to escape simultaneously I’ll be stuck! Can you do stairs with a walker, or are you living a downstairs life like me?

    I am trying to get out in the fresh air every day while the weather isn’t too bad. Today I walked about half an hour, to the corner and round it and up to the next corner, then back. I did want to carry on all the way round the block, but the next section is a shared pedestrian and cycle path and H persuaded me not to risk it. Sometimes cyclists come along it very fast. I say the weather isn’t too bad, but you couldn’t say it was good. No rain as such, but a constant foggy haze that leaves everything damp. The stone step at the end of our path was scarily slippery with algae, so I got H to brush some sand there, which helped. He has promised to pressure clean it tomorrow. A THR makes one feel so vulnerable!

    @Mojo333, yes I get the Princess and Pea thing. My wretched TED stockings, even after the retrofit, are really bugging me at the moment. But despite everything, I felt strangely blissed out for most of today. It can’t be the drugs, I’ve only been using paracetamol for 3 days now and I actually went 10 hours without thinking of taking even those. It must be the endorphins kicking in. Long may it continue!
     
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  12. Layla

    Layla FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    You sound great Klassy. I felt a type of high, comparable to your "blissed out", I imagine and it wasn't the drugs either because I was off them. It was the second chance THR was affording me. The ability to move forward without that wretched pain. The future looked bright and full of promise.

    Regarding the crutches, I just read in the last couple of weeks of someone placing their crutches upside down when not using them as you move around close by. More of a base to to keep them upright. You might want to try it. I hope you have a nice New Years Eve and day!
    @Klassy
     
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  13. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I also felt a rush of ...when this is over...I'll be good to go.
    Isn't it exciting?:yahoo:
     
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  14. oregonlass

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    @Klassy. What fun to discover commonalities! Much of my ancestry is British Isles plus my husband hails from Yorkshire. So for me UK is sort of a second home.
    We moved to this house this summer, (what a surprise blessing) was a 2 story home... now all on one level. A bungalow in the UK would be such a blessing.
    I picked up used tools at the thrift shops. A 2-wheel walker which they wanted us to start on, and a 4-wheel walker which is much easier for normal walking motion and bigger wheels for outdoors.
    My husband helps me get the walker down/up the steps. With the new steps/railing, I can manage those pretty easy. They used to be two 9” steps and no rail. Cut that those into 5-1’2” steps and added the railing. So easy and deep steps. Won’t be long before able to do it on my own.
    No euphoria here, just a good feeling of moving forward. Feels nice... and of course with no OS pain... life is good.
     
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  15. oregonlass

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  16. Klassy

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    @oregonlass, you amaze me. Having Airbnb guests already, that’s fantastic. I’d be embarrassed to show even non-paying guests our place at the moment. The fact that I’m sleeping in the dining room, and the dining room furniture is crammed into the living room, doesn’t help, but I have to confess that housekeeping standards have slumped to an all time low. Though I suppose I shouldn’t say that, there is every likelihood they will go lower! H is very good at looking after me, but he has that special sort of vision that just doesn’t see mess. I’m trying to cultivate the same, until I’m fully fit. Then there will be a glorious spring cleaning.

    Home made scones, how delicious! And clotted cream, that’s the proper stuff!

    Thanks for info. I’ll investigate the apps. I can see that a 4 wheeled walker would enable smooth walking. You don’t ever get the feeling it is going to run away from you?
     
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  17. Klassy

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    Great tip, thanks Layla!
     
  18. oregonlass

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    . The brakes are integrated into the handle. I started on the 2-wheel unit you push. Waited until my head was clear and balance “normal” before I started with the rolling unit. Little loops in the house to get the feel.
    Your hand actually sits on the handle but fingers are on the brake. The KEY - when you stop...set the brake. That way it can’t move or shift while you are trying to do something. Hubby never left me alone with it until he saw I had made the habit of setting the brake. Outside,the big wheels roll so much better than the other walker. I think they are probably 4-5 inches. Loads of these available cheap from charity shops or free local online listings. I was going to use it and resell it. Think it may end up wrapped in plastic and hung in the garage. They do come in different sizes. The petite is a better fit for me, but it is a bit narrower and I find I have to pay attention walking outdoors or I touch my left foot as I roll it forward.

    They do give crutches as an option...but anyone who saw me try to navigate on crutches would take them away from me. Been there tried that, not my forte. I never could learn to go up or down stairs with them. When I fell and cracked my heel, I had to do stairs sitting down for 2 months. It was horrible.
     
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  19. oregonlass

    oregonlass junior member

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    @Klassy.
    One note on 4 wheel roller getting away from you.... I’m on pretty flat area. I’d definitely avoid steep hills while hip healed. By the time you felt comfortable doing hills or uneven ground you probably wouldn’t use more than a cane/walking stick or nothing.
     
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  20. Klassy

    Klassy senior
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    Hi @oregonlass . You are so right about shortage of storage being an issue. And too much stuff! Whenever I have one of my cleanup frenzies, the house looks lovely for a while, but H laments ( with some justification) that he can’t find anything. I lived in Australia for some years, and when UK people ask me what I miss most, I always say “my 4 bedroom house with built in wardrobes in every bedroom”!
    There is a plus to our narrow terrace houses, and that is that everything is close together. Before OA, I could walk to a major shopping centre in 15 minutes, to work in 20, and be among woodlands and fields of grazing sheep in 30. Mind you, lots of people still drive those short trips. I am the world’s worst parker, so I always prefer to walk if I can.
     
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