Ask the Expert Webinar
Lounge Doctor

TKR Will I ever be the same?

Ktbadknee

new member
Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Messages
5
Age
60
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Im scheduled for October 19. Im scared. I kayak , bike, hike and just retired as well as closing on a house in 10 days. I tore a meniscus again after having stem cells injected 7 months ago. I see the scar pictures, hear the stories and like others Im scared. My husband runs marathons and hikes 14 ers. Yikes. He will leave me behind! Thanks for listening to my pity party. I gotta get brave.
 

Pumpkln

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
23,331
Location
United States, West
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@Ktbadknee
Welcome to BoneSmart glad you joined us! :welome:

I kayak , bike, hike and just retired as well as closing on a house in 10 days.
You should be able to participate in all of the above once your knee has fully healed, as well you may be able to join your husband climbing those 14 ers.
This will all take time and patience.
That said everyone heals differently, and outcomes can vary.
Sports after TJR: knee replacements not harmed by most sports

The most important factor in success is your choice of surgeons, I assume you have chosen an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knee replacements and does 100's of them a year.

New BoneSmart members like you are in various stages of their journey to joint replacement. Making the decision whether or not to have surgery and preparing for surgery can be easier once you have done your research and know what lies ahead. Here are some tools that can help you decide what is best for you.

If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:

Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic knee?
Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?


If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:

Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?


Regardless of where you are in the process, the website and app My Knee Guide can help you stay organized and informed. The free service keeps all the information pertaining to your surgery and recovery in one place on your smartphone. It is intended to be a personal support tool for the entire process.

And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced knee, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:

Stories of amazing knee recoveries
 

Tykey

big-cheese
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
4,548
Age
72
Location
Sheffield, uk
Kayaking is perfectly possible, but getting in and out will be difficult, unless you have someone to assist.
I had difficulty in getting out of my canadian canoe, but with my mates holding the canoe steady, and others holding on to me, it was possible.
 
OP
OP
K

Ktbadknee

new member
Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Messages
5
Age
60
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
I have a surgeon in Seattle who uses a robotic arm and 3D Guided CT scan. He does 4 hundred a year. It is a day surgery with a spinal and sedation. No home PT. I will have my husband take me to PT. When can I start taking walks, ride a stationary bike, lift arm weights? I haven’t asked him what prosthetic he uses or does he leave the ACL if it looks good. What else can I ask?
 
OP
OP
K

Ktbadknee

new member
Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Messages
5
Age
60
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Why is getting in and out of a kayak difficult?
 

Tykey

big-cheese
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
4,548
Age
72
Location
Sheffield, uk
Getting out of a kayak?

Because I didn't have the flexibility and strength in the knee to get my foot underneath me and stand up. So I had to do it on one leg, which doesn't do much for stability.
I'm a big lad, so that didn't help.
I'm not saying it's impossible, just that you will need to develop a different technique to avoid regular swimming sessions.
But if you don't try......
Good luck
 

Celle

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
40,777
Location
New Zealand
Gender
Female
Country
New Zealand New Zealand
Because of the amount of bending your new knee will have to do, at the same time as maintaining balance. Initially, your knee won't bend well. It is possible, though.

If you read the article Pumpkln left you, - Stories of amazing knee recoveries - you will see that it is indeed possible to resume a normal life, once your knee has healed properly, which can take as long as a full year.

When can I start taking walks, ride a stationary bike, lift arm weights?
You'll start walking right from Day One post-op (with assistance), and you'll gradually increase the amount of walking you do. When I started walking outdoors, I used to time my walk, starting with 5 minutes out and 5 minutes back, gradually increasing the time and taking note of how my new knee reacted.

This is a long recovery, a marathon not a sprint, and you have to learn to pace yourself.

Your PT will guide you about the use of a stationary cycle, starting first with rocking the pedals back and forth and gradually working up to doing a full rotation as your knee flexion increases.
It's important not to try to rush your recovery, as doing too much, too soon, can have an adverse effect.
Arm weights should be OK from quite early in recovery, as upper-body exercises shouldn't strain a new knee.

Here are a few articles, to give you some guidance:
the BoneSmart view on exercise
BoneSmart philosophy for sensible post op therapy

Activity progression for TKRs
Knee recovery - Lose the Work Ethic!!
 
OP
OP
K

Ktbadknee

new member
Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Messages
5
Age
60
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
I need help deciding about the heighth of the bed I well sleep in after surgery at my home. My bed is pretty low to the floor and my other one in the guest room is much higher from the floor. I would like to hear about experiences from others.
 

Celle

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
40,777
Location
New Zealand
Gender
Female
Country
New Zealand New Zealand
@Ktbadknee - you will see that I have moved your post from the October Feisties thread to your own thread.

Please remember that the monthly surgery threads threads are primarily to allow you to see who has surgery the same month as you. Discussion of issues, comments, and questions regarding surgery must be kept in your individual thread.

Please post any updates or questions about your preparation for surgery in this, your own thread. We will see them here, as someone checks all the new posts every day.
If you need an urgent response to a question, just tag a member of staff.
How to tag another member; how to answer when someone tags you

If you prefer a different thread title, just post what you want and we'll get it changed for you.

Just in case you couldn't find your thread, here are the instructions on finding your thread,
How can I find my threads and posts? . Many members bookmark their thread, so they can find it when they log on. Please will you do that?
 

Celle

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
40,777
Location
New Zealand
Gender
Female
Country
New Zealand New Zealand
I would choose the higher bed. It's often a good idea to sleep in a separate room from your partner at first anyway, so you don't disturb each other.

If your bed is very high and you have trouble getting into it now, have a look around for a good, safe step, to help you get in.
 

TBITKR

junior member
Joined
Jul 19, 2020
Messages
32
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hi @Ktbadknee, I too was a very active cyclist, competitive runner, trail runner. Since I’m only 6 weeks post TKR, I don’t know if I’ll be able to build my strength back. The only important thing I can share is that the injury this surgery causes to all your soft tissues is EXTREME. . and you must REST, REST, REST. It’s tough to lay around all day, but again, it’s a MUST. Take over the couch with pillows to ice & elevate all day. And when you go to PT, go easy, don’t push it .. just bc you can doesn’t mean you should. “Listen to your body” isn’t possible with pain meds muffling the sound.
It was lucky you found this site early. Wish I had. Congrats on your retirement! Good luck on your house! Best wishes for your recovery!!!
 

Tri Mom

new member
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
18
Age
62
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hi KTbadknee,

I am a triathlete and seriously plan to race again - even if it means I walk the Run portion after going all out on the swim and bike. I have to remind myself that healing doesn't happen overnight. We have another walk in the Lake District in England next summer. I am determined to do that.
Best wishes and remember to be patient with yourself.
 

leejaa

FORUM ADVISOR
Forum Advisor
Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
3,181
Age
66
Location
NY State
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
I used a higher bed for my recovery as well as the recliner. I could almost sit on the edge of the bed so I would and then lay back bringing my leg up with a strap provided by the hospital. I did practice before surgery so I sort of knew what worked. However, the recliner was my most used space as it was easy to get in and out of and provided support for legs and back.
 

kayak59

senior
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
341
Age
61
Location
St Louis, MO
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hi @Ktbadknee

I am a kayaker and have continued doing both white water and sea kayaking after my knee replacements and hip replacements. (And riding my bike, camping, and hiking.) The way I get in my boats is to sit down on the seat and, pull my knee to my chest and then slide the leg in. I was kayaking within two months after all of these surgeries -- with the help of friends, to be sure. At first I had to get in and out of the kayak by sitting on the hull behind the seat and then sliding in but could do my old maneuver after 9 months with one knee and 12 on the other. (Could do it almost right away after my THRs.) If I have to land my kayak on an uphill incline, then getting out is difficult. Anytime my butt is lower than my knees, the harder it is for me to get up. Getting out from the side is also hard because again, the butt is lower than the knees. But, that is true of many of my friends who haven't had this surgery! Sometimes I just roll out on my hands and knees and then get up. Others times, I get a hand to haul me up -- but again, I'm not alone in that. If you have any specific kayaking related questions, just let me know!
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
K

Ktbadknee

new member
Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Messages
5
Age
60
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
there are 3 types of walkers to use post operatively. Which is the best one to use??
 

Pumpkln

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
23,331
Location
United States, West
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@Ktbadknee
You'll notice that I have merged your newest post in the October Feisties to your original recovery thread. The October Feisties Team thread is for members to find other members who are having surgery at the same time you will be having your TKR. Please keep your updates and questions in your own thread.

So please post any updates, questions or concerns about your TKR preparation here. If you prefer a different thread title, just post what you want and we'll get it changed for you.
If you need an urgent response to a question, just tag a member of staff.

How to tag another member; how to answer when someone tags you

Many members bookmark their thread in their computer browser, so they can find it when they log on.
 

Pumpkln

MODERATOR
Moderator
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
23,331
Location
United States, West
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
3 types of walkers/frames:

Pick up walker (no wheels): For individuals with a high risk of falls/poor balance, and unability to control a wheeled walker.

Front Wheeled Walker: For individuals with fair balance, able to keep the walker in good control.
Available with small plastic wheels, for in home use (short term use). Larger rubber front wheels are available for outdoor use and going over uneven surfaces.

Four Wheeled Walker: For individuals who will be using a walker long term, for both indoor and outdoor use, who need to sit down frequently, or to have a storage basket for items. Requires good control of walker and ability to engage the brakes as needed. Should have fair balance and good cognition.

For short term use after a TKR/THR a pick up walker or a front wheeled walker will be more than adequate to meet your needs.
 

rustic

member
Joined
Dec 3, 2018
Messages
163
Age
61
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
My husband runs marathons and hikes 14 ers. Yikes. He will leave me behind!
Yes, you won't be able to match steps with your husband, for "a while," but stay optimistic. Previous to my TKR, my wife and I were doing ultra distance hikes and races. It took me two years after the surgery to be back to her level, but I'm pretty much there now. We've been doing rough/steep hikes in the 15-18 miles range. We also rock climb and mountain bike together. As far as "fourteeners" go, it is possible. DW and I climbed Mt. Sneffels a couple months ago.
I'm not as strong as I was yet though (still working on that), and the knee certainly feels vulnerable to bumps so I have to wear protection sometimes.
 

New

Active Antibacterial

BoneSmart #1 Best Blog

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
52,589
Messages
1,399,697
BoneSmarties
32,801
Latest member
doxie girl
Recent bookmarks
0

Top Bottom