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What to expect pre-op?

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by CorpHippie, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. CorpHippie

    CorpHippie new member
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    I’m curious as to what I can expect the day of surgery. Like before I am knocked out and right after I am awake. This is a MAKO surgery and I’ve heard different things. Like I’ll have to have IV in both arms (not sure why). And things like that. How common is a block vs general? Just trying to keep the nerves down a bit and was looking for what I’m in for. Thank you so much in advance.
     
  2. Jaycey

    Jaycey SUPER MODERATOR Moderator

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    @CorpHippie You are posting in the right place. Ask all your pre-op questions here.
    Probably saline on one side and your anaesthetic on the other.
    More and more surgeons are using a spinal plus sedation. Discuss this with your surgeon. Have you had a pre-op assessment yet. You will be able to discuss this at that meeting as well.

    Have a read around the TKR recovery area. Lots of good experiences shared that might just ease your nerves. Keep asking your questions - we are here to help.
     
  3. julie1968

    julie1968 junior member

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    I'm having a spinal with sedation. Does that mean I won't have to get the tube down my throat? I'm hoping not I always get a sore throat after from it.
     
  4. Bionic

    Bionic post-grad

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    @julie1968 I had the spinal with sedation and never had a tube down my throat so fingers crossed you won't either.
    The spinal is great because you aren't groggy or nauseous afterwards.
     
  5. julie1968

    julie1968 junior member

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    Thank you @Bionic im very bad with anesthesia and strong pain meds. I have to take alot of zofran. I'm so glad there is this option
     
  6. rosieNZ

    rosieNZ junior member

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    My way if dealing with this big surgery is to have faith! Doctors who will give you anaestherics are experts. Be guided by them. Have a spinal if they think it is the best option for you (its easier to recover from). If you need a general anaesthetic then you do. Because? Because what you really need is a new joint! Right?
    Intravenous lines are put in to give medications and other access should it be required. You would want doctors to be able to give you what you need.

    There is good info on this site about preparing your home and yourself for surgery. That's really very helpful.
    Can you change your focus to control the things that will support you in your recovery?

    Most people have fear about surgery. Its a biggee. You need it so think of her future, all things you will be focussing on in your rehab and the goals you want to achieve (if possible) after surgery. I have been thinking about how restricted I am currently and how great it will be to be done with this stage, get into rehab for my new knee and living a life less restricted.
    Best wishes
    Rosie
     
  7. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    This article may help:
    Pre-op interviews - what's involved?

    And here's the pre-op reading we give people:
    If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
    Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic knee?
    Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

    Regardless of where you are in the process, the website and app My Knee Guide can help you stay organized and informed. The free service keeps all the information pertaining to your surgery and recovery in one place on your smartphone. It is intended to be a personal support tool for the entire process.

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced knee, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
    Stories of amazing knee recoveries
     
  8. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    It's not a "have to", it's the anaesthetist's choice! Can't think of a good reason for it, actually!
    Most orthopaedic and anaesthetic departments opted quite a while ago for spinals rather then GA for the simple and overwhelming reason that it is safer! A LOT safer! Read this Anaesthetics - spinals, femoral blocks, GAs and everything else

    @julie1968 The whole point is to avoid the general which requires intubation. Read the article I gave above.
     
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  9. HoneyB

    HoneyB senior

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    The hospital where I had my surgery offered a pre-surgery class for knee and hip replacement patients. A nurse from the orthopedic surgical floor told us what to expect from check-in through release to go home. Check to see if that's available at your surgery center.

    I had general anesthesia and was fine with that. When I woke up in recovery, my knee was hurting. The anesthesiologist came in promptly and gave me a shot in my thigh that killed the pain completely and instantly. That lasted several hours. Overall, my pain wasn't as bad as I'd feared it would be, but my surgeon was liberal with pain meds. He sent me home with prescriptions for three different meds and I only used one of them, Percocet. After three weeks, he switched me to a less potent pain reliever, Tramadol.
     
  10. CorpHippie

    CorpHippie new member
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    I want to tell ALL of you thank you! I feel MUCH better than I was feeling when I posted. I think my fear of a block is hearing them break the bone. I can’t even watch all of Botched without peeking between fingers and squirming! I’m super confident in my Dr and the entire team. I just keep thinking about my last knee surgery (same knee) when my meniscus had to be repaired. To keep it short surgery was fine but due to circumstances i was 100% alone on that day. Checked in alone, took a cab home, all of it. Putting things in order in my head keeps the boogie man at bay. And each one of you has truly helped! Thank you again!
     
  11. Jaycey

    Jaycey SUPER MODERATOR Moderator

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    Just tell staff you do not want to see or hear anything in OR. They will put you into a very comfy sleep and when you wake up you will be in recovery.

    You are not alone my friend. We are with you all the way!
     
  12. Sunnyo

    Sunnyo new member

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    Yes I had a spinal with my ltkr and wanted to be out. Woke up in recovery and was not sick like with a general. And when you wake up it's over and then just getting on with recovery. Have my rtkr in 4 weeks. Count down on...just need my wrist cast off from a slip and fall and will be good to go
     
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  13. maryo52

    maryo52 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I think one IV is more common. Whether you get general or spinal anesthesia, it starts with a dose of "Happy Juice" in the IV -- technically it's midazolam, a sedative that also causes amnesia. So, for instance, they do your spinal while you're sedated with happy juice and so you don't mind and often do not remember.
     
  14. julie1968

    julie1968 junior member

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    I'm right with you @Sunnyo LTKR March 7. I'm glad I'm getting the spinal I have alot of nausea with the general anesthesia even with Zofran first. Good vibes to you and your surgery
     
  15. Sunnyo

    Sunnyo new member

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    Yes good luck to you. My biggest concern right now is using crutches after. I fractured my wrist January 7 and am cased till the 20 of this month. My rright hand is going to be pretty weak. The orthopedic from er said it should be fine but the stairs in my house concern me. Maybe I can go up and down on my bum
     
  16. julie1968

    julie1968 junior member

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    @Sunnyo Be very careful. I have 10 steps to get into my apartment luckily my Dr scheduled my post op a month out so I don't have to worry about going back down for awhile. Not sure if your Bum is a good idea either.
     
  17. Sunnyo

    Sunnyo new member

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    No I don't think the bum would work. I know they do train on steps at the hospital before you leave . It just will take a long time up and down. My staircase is wide with a landing. Last time I never used my crutches just the walker. I know the steps are doable but sometimes your just ready to lay down now without the work of going up.
    One person posted it was good exercise for recovery so I will look at it that way.
    I'm a bit concerned as I fractured my wrist the beginning of January with my cast off next week and having my wrist weak.
    At least both knees will be stable.
    Soon we will be on the healing side
     
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