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TrueMatch knee replacement

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by TKgirl, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. TKgirl

    TKgirl new member
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    I'm having my surgery for total knee replacement on March 21 2018. Had my CT imaging completed and it will take 3-4 weeks to build the true match knee replacement and guides.

    Doing research to see other experiences and guidance.

    It is my first one and I am still young and so hopefully recovery will not be as hard.

    This will be my 6th surgery on my leg though. I had a compound fracture of the tibia, broken fibula, femur and crushed pelvic bone. I had a rod in my femur and pins in tibia with screws. With all that damage it caused the knee to get to the level of a full replacement.

    I am nervous and hope I get good guidance and feedback.
     
  2. robhunt3

    robhunt3 member

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    That's a good date for a TKR @TKgirl, my birthday :).
    It's incredible to think that you'll get a bespoke knee, one of a kind, made specifically for you.
    Try not to worry and keep that positive attitude - you will be so much better off once it is done.
    Take care, and all the best for the 21st March.
     
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  3. SusieShoes

    SusieShoes FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Hi @TKgirl and :welome: to BoneSmart. You’ve certainly had quite the journey with that knee, and if you’re at the point you need a TKR, you’ll be glad to know most people get wonderful results. Our community is made up of people who have gone through or, like yourself, are planning to go through joint replacement. We’ve been where you are and look forward to helping and supporting you.

    Here's some pre-op reading for you.

    If you have concern about pain with this surgery, Plan For Pain, can be helpful for having this discussion with your medical team.

    New BoneSmart members like you are in various stages of their journey to joint replacement. Making the decision whether or not to have surgery and preparing for surgery can be easier once you have done your research and know what lies ahead. Here are some tools that can help you decide what is best for you.

    If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:

    Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic knee?
    Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:

    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

    Regardless of where you are in the process, the website and app My Knee Guide can help you stay organized and informed. The free service keeps all the information pertaining to your surgery and recovery in one place on your smartphone. It is intended to be a personal support tool for the entire process.

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced knee, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:

    Stories of amazing knee recoveries


    If you have any questions or concerns, fire away - we're here to help.
     
  4. PolarBear60

    PolarBear60 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Age doesn't necessarily make recovery from TKR easier or harder. That's going to vary from person to person. Even exceptional fitness prior to surgery doesn't necessarily make recovery easier or harder. No matter who goes through it, it's about a year long recovery. Of course, you'll be active long before that year. Managing expectations seems to be more important. That, and listening to your body.

    In the library, there's a guide for what to expect at each point along your knee recovery. Your knee may be faster in some areas and slower in others. It's just a guide. For me, the key was to break down tasks I had to do into their smallest components and resting in between. In hindsight, I wish I'd rested even more those first few weeks.

    By resting, you allow your body to focus on repairing the damage done by the surgery. If you're not doing a bunch of other things, your body can focus on that one thing. Of course, you'll move around a little going to and from the bathroom, dressing, getting meals and snacks and such -- that's good. It ensures you have good blood flow and gently stretches and contracts muscles to keep them mobile. Sometimes people feel that wanting to nap and rest during the day is somehow wrong, and I hope to help you understand the value of it for your recovery.

    Expect to be massively slowed down from what you're accustomed to for the first 6-12 weeks. During the 6th to 12th week, you'll most likely find you're able to gradually resume more normal duties. I'm almost two and three years out from my TKRs, and I'm still making incremental improvements. If you keep this in mind, you're likely to find you have a great recovery.
     
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  5. TKgirl

    TKgirl new member
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    Thank you for your response as that would be s major problem with me. I always want to be on the move and doing.
     
  6. Jockette

    Jockette FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Resting is not “doing nothing. “. It’s giving your knee the best condition for it to heal.

    Someone else said it more elaborately, hopefully it will get posted.

    Best wishes to you!
     
  7. SusieShoes

    SusieShoes FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    A lot of people have trouble thinking of resting as “doing something.” Our culture here in the States equates lack of activity with sloth, and we’re terribly puritanical about it. Which is a shame, because resting is exactly the right thing to do (yes, do, because you are actively doing it) for your injured body.

    One thing to keep in mind is that this inactivity is temporary. Though full recovery will take a year or maybe more, the period of active resting (where you might have to rein yourself in) might be as little as a few weeks or more likely a couple of months. Once your knee is less swollen, more mobile, and less painful, you will get back to moving around as much as you wish. The key is to not wish for more than your knee can do, but people get back to being active... and in some cases very active.

    It might help to remind yourself that by taking it slow, you’ll get there faster than those folks who push too hard, too soon.

    One of our advisors says the following about letting your knee heal:

    When you are icing and elevating and watching telly you are not 'dossing around' you are 'engaging a carefully considered proactively designed heuristically programmed dynamically structured recovery programme'.
     
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  8. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    Don't know who told you that but our experience here is that it's just not true! TKR recovery is always hard!
    When you are icing and elevating and watching telly you are not 'dossing around' you are 'engaging a carefully considered pro-actively designed, heuristically programmed, dynamically structured recovery programme'.
     
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  9. Jockette

    Jockette FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Yeah, that one!
     
  10. mcestang

    mcestang junior member

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    I thought the same thing...I’m 43 and in decent shape, recovery won’t be hard for ME, I’m superwoman LOL I’m 10 days out and I had a big wake up call. I had read many of the recovery posts prior to my surgery. But for some reason I had my expectations higher. This caused the blues to settle in fast. I’ve had many tears but I now realize that this is very hard for anyone regardless of age/fitness. The realization has settled in that what everyone says is true ;) this is a marathon and not a sprint. I learned the hard way that I need to REST. That doing nothing is OK. I was walking ALOT around the house just a few days out, trying to help one handed while on my walker, only to be completely miserable with swelling and pain. My body spoke loud and clear. Now I spend my days in bed with a good book and I have little guilt (until my 10yo old son asks me why I haven’t done anything).

    I don’t know what I’m trying to say, I’m rambling...it’s the meds LOL. Just mentally prepare to SLOW down to a haunt and don’t place your expectations high. It’s hard work but I/we need to keep focused at the light down the end of the road and know that this will pass and we’ll get to our goal....mine is to obviously be pain free and enjoy being 43 like I should be, enjoying activities with my son. I can’t wait to go hiking, biking, actual vacations that require walking. Good luck to you!
     

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