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Too young

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by war3235, Jul 15, 2017.

  1. war3235

    war3235
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    I am having a total hip replacement on my right hip in less than 2 weeks. My hip has been hurting for the past 6 years but this last year has been very painful. I had an injection that only gave me comfort for about a month.

    I feel weird because I'm only 49 years old. I'm very physically fit and an avid weight lifter. I used to run everyday but I can no longer run like I used to. I look like the picture of health but in a lot of pain.

    During my hip replacement class I felt very out of place. Everyone else there looked like they really need this procedure. I kinda feel like that able body jerk who parks in the handicap space.

    I am also worried that my hip replacement will prevent me from remaining physically fit.
     
  2. Irish Joe

    Irish Joe FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Short answer.
    It won't stop you keeping fit.
    I was quite active before my replacements.
    These new type hips are quite robust (not unbreakable though).
    With some changes there is no reason you cant get back to regular exercise.
    I've quit the impact stuff but I cycle, swim, and do yoga all in moderation though.
    Hip pain stops you doing things.
    Hip replacement allows you to start doing some of them again.
    Best wishes on your op.
    Joe....
     
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  3. prabu_jkt

    prabu_jkt

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    You think you are too young for THR? well I'm 30 and 2 weeks post-op :)

    I had cancer two years ago, mediastinal seminona a typical young adult cancer after massive chemo and radiation I've been clear right after the treatments. My doc said the AVN in my both hips is possibly caused by chemo or/and caused by steroid during chemo and radiation therapy.
     
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  4. Horseshoe

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    @war3235 hi, most of us felt the same about getting thrs on the younger side, you are not alone! Would imagine those who are older probably feel the same way too. OS said the average age for thr has dropped from 65-70 yrs to 45-50 yrs since he started practicing, likely due to high activity levels.

    The good news is your youth and fitness level will help you in recovery and you can def retain your fitness though high impact activities are not normally advised.

    @prabu_jkt you are a trooper! I'm glad you're doing so well after cancer treatment and thr surgery :)
     
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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
  5. Pumpkln

    Pumpkln FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    war3235,
    Sounds like your hip is holding you back and limiting your life. Here is a score chart so you can see just how limited you are. Score chart: how bad is my arthritic hip/knee

    Teenage hip replacements , I am sure these teens would think you really need a THR.

    Hidden handicaps are the hardest, you look OK, but have a challenges no one can see.

    You will be more active after your THR when the pain is gone. But wait until you are recovered.
    Stories of amazing hip recoveries
    Dancing after THR: 4 months pics THR

    Here is the pre op reading:
    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?
    Score chart: how bad is my arthritic hip/knee

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced hip, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
    Stories of amazing hip recoveries

    And the post op reading:

    Hip Recovery: The Guidelines
    1. Don’t worry: Your body will heal all by itself. Relax, let it, don't try and hurry it, don’t worry about any symptoms now, they are almost certainly temporary
    2. Control discomfort:
    rest
    elevate
    ice
    take your pain meds by prescription schedule (not when pain starts!)
    3. Do what you want to do BUT
    a. If it hurts, don't do it and don't allow anyone - especially a physical therapist - to do it to you
    b. If your leg swells more or gets stiffer in the 24 hours after doing it, don't do it again.
    4. PT or exercise can be useful BUT take note of these
    BoneSmart philosophy for sensible post op therapy
    5. At week 4 and after you should follow this Activity progression for THRs

    Pain management and the pain chart
    Healing: how long does it take?
    Chart representation of THR recovery

    Dislocation risk and 90 degree rule
    Energy drain for THRs
    Pain and swelling control: elevation is the key

    Post op blues is a reality - be prepared for it

    Myth busting: on getting addicted to pain meds
    Sleep deprivation is pretty much inevitable - but what causes it?

    BIG TIP: Hips actually don't need any exercise to get better. They do a pretty good job of it all on their own if given half a chance. Trouble is, people don't give them a chance and end up with all sorts of aches and pains and sore spots. All they need is the best therapy which is walking and even then not to excess.

    We try to keep the forum a positive and safe place for our members to talk about their questions or concerns and to report successes with their joint replacement surgery. While members may create as many threads as they like in a majority of BoneSmart's forums, we ask that each member have only one recovery thread. This policy makes it easier to go back and review history before providing advice.
     
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  6. sfbaylover

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    @war3235

    Your post resonates with me. I'm 42 and have had bad hips since age 13, basically. I had both hips pinned due to SCFE (childhood hip disorder), and was left with two malformed hip joints, which, over the years, slowly became arthritic. My right hip is pretty worn out; my left not as bad.

    Like you, I am very active and can still perform a wide variety of exercise, including weight lifting, walking, and cycling. But my hips are stiff, and my mobility is deficient. I can't bend or stoop or squat very well, and my lateral movement is poor. But my hip joints themselves don't hurt. I do have chronic lower back pain and stiffness, along with occasional knee and lower leg pain, but again, virtually no hip pain.

    I am going to have my right hip replaced this year, but like you, I question whether or not I am truly debilitated enough to warrant having the surgery. Because outside of the mechanical limitations and stiffness caused by my hips, my pain levels are not that bad.
     
  7. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    These are the only ways you are too young to have your hip replaced:
    • You are too young to be living your life in constant pain.
    • You are too young to have your mobility so badly compromised.
    • You are too young to be giving up the lifestyle you enjoy.
    • You are too young feel so old.
     
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  8. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

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    Haven't you heard? 50 is the new 30!
     
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  9. dlp

    dlp

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    Yep - never too young for a new hip if you are living with pain.

    I'm 51 and hitting week 6 post-op for left THR. I had a few moments of the "I'm too young" thoughts when the problems really started, but not being able to sleep a full night had a way of turning that right around into "Can't wait til I get that new hip" pretty quickly.

    I have osteoarthritis, but in 2015 I had an arthroscopic procedure to basically handle a combined impingement (on both cam and pincer) on the left hip to see if that would provide some relief first. It did, for about 18 months, but the pain was back at about 80% shortly after that. Replacement was the only option that was going to totally take care of it.

    You never know what medical cards you will be dealt later, so being in good shape and having it done now is a bit of a plus, in my opinion. I'm a bit younger and still mostly fit and in good enough shape that I can take care of myself - within post-op restriction guidelines. Still need some help from my wife occasionally :)

    Good luck.
     
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  10. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Well said @dlp. Felt exactly the same at 53 but healthy otherwise.
    But Lord - you have the creepiest Avatar I've ever seen....
     
  11. JayP

    JayP

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    Had my RTHR at 44 just over 2 years ago. Back to boxing, weight lifting, and walking/hiking/cycling. I've been cleared for just about anything and have chosen to stay light on the squatting and deadlifting. Once I was given the ok for weight lifting, I had planned on a very VERY slow progression on squats and deadlifts but once I got to the point where the reps were becoming tough I thought "I don't need to lift heavy for financial or pride reasons". I can stay in shape just fine with a lower weight for those exercises.

    I do know what you mean about the education class; I was the youngest there by far. I know how bad my hips felt leading up to the surgery and how it was impacting my daily life.
     
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  12. Cisne

    Cisne

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    I promise there are lots of us 40 somethings here! I waited almost two years to have my THR, and wish I had done it two years ago! Wishing you well!
    Michele
     
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  13. alexthecat

    alexthecat MODERATOR Administrator

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    I had my THR at the ripe old age of 42. I had a recovery buddy here on the forum who was the same age. That was more than 7 years ago and we are both back to our normal, active lives. There are more 40-somethings walking around on new hips than you might think. After a few weeks of recovery, we look and act just like anyone else.
     
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  14. dlp

    dlp

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    Thanks :)
     
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  15. dlp

    dlp

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  16. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    ("Mwah-ha-ha-ha-haaaaaaaaah!")
    got it!!!
     
  17. Jules2716

    Jules2716

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    My son is 17 years old, for the last 18 months he has been in a lot of pain, initially diagnosed with Idiopathic Chondrolysis in his left hip. He has been on medication and crutches for the last year, with promises of a THR just recently taken away! He has now been told that the medical experts want to leave him until his hip is fused naturally (supposedly he will then be pain free)- then having to walk using his back and knee and in 30 years time to do the THR.........is he too young?
     
  18. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    @Jaycey @Josephine might have to answer that @Jules2716 ...
    I know there are young folks with THR...
    Doesn't sound right to me but I don't know under what circumstances.
    So sorry your son is in distress...
     
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  19. dlp

    dlp

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    Adding my 2 cents, I'm with Mojo333 - doesn't sound right to me. Obviously medical professionals have their reasons, however I'd at least get several other opinions. Living with pain SUCKS. Medicine is doing amazing things these days and I would be doing all I could to find out what other options exist.

    Not saying that a THR is the solution, but to wait 30 YEARS from now for relief/repair is just wrong in my opinion. Perhaps waiting is the only/right solution, but I'd make sure that (at least several) more than 1 group of experts looked me over before giving in.
     
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  20. Jules2716

    Jules2716

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    Thanks guys!
     

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