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Too heavy for knee replacement?

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RestAssured

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Yay yay yay! Good for you! I Am so proud of you! We will be here "every step of the way"! :happydance:
 
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scarlett

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Hello! Update: Today I saw the pain nurse- complete waste of time. She told me to go swimming (wouldn't you know it?) and take paracetamol and then come back in 3 months. Pointless. I then saw the private neurologist who has allowed me to try Sativex for pain but it will cost me £300 for a months supply. I just don't have it. Tomorrow I am seeing my GP and I am going to insist she refers me to a different knee surgeon straightaway. £150 to see the neurologist today and it will be another £150 to see the knee surgeon. I could do it on the NHS of course but really cannot contemplate waiting any longer for appointments and then only get to see "a member of the team"- ie- a physio who works in the department, NOT the surgeon. And the physio will tell me to.... go swimming. You can tell I've been going round in circles a lot can't you?!
 

Josephine

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Actually, the rule is always that new patients get seen by the consultant (unless he's on holiday or something) so you can make sure you see him by phoning his secretary and asking her to make sure you are put into a clinic that he is going to be present at. She will do that for you.
 
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scarlett

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I had several appointments to see Luc Louette the ankle man and never saw him in person til I went private. Similarly I never saw the IBD specialist when I was in Dorset, only ever saw the nurse. The letters always say ' you may see a member of the team'. It's a rule I wish they would keep! But thanks I will ask the secretary for sure :)
 

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The letters always say ' you may see a member of the team'.
Ah! Therein lies the clue! When the letters says that, take it as confirmation that you will NOT be seeing the consultant. Then phone the secretary and tell her you specifically want to see him and will accept no-one else because you have questions you believe only he can answer adequately.
 

RestAssured

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Jo, I don't understand. When we go to the doctor we see the doctor. Why do they say "you may see a member of the team.". I know ahead of time if the doctor is out and have the option to reschedule if I don't want to see a PA.
 

Josephine

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In the UK, a 'member of the team' means the registrar (whose next job will probably be a consultant surgeon) or rarely an orthopaedic consultant nurse which would probably be someone like me in experience and information skills. Plus, our appointments system for the entire orthopaedic department is run by a body of administrators and clerks who have little contact with the surgeon himself. There is a standing diary of clinics for each surgeon so one chap will have, say, clinics on Monday morning, Wednesday morning and Thursday afternoon. But of course he's not going to be present for some when he is on leave so the registrar will be standing in for him. And finally, since appointments are sometimes sent out 8 weeks or more in advance, often not even the consultant will know if he's actually going to be there or not! Is that complicated enough for you? It's the NHS! :snork:
 

RestAssured

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I notice that the consultants leave for months at a time sometimes. Is this when they go teach others, or is this a vacation?
 

Josephine

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They have 6 weeks annual leave, 2-4 weeks study leave each year depending upon their seniority and in other times might be called upon to deliver lectures to a number of other disciplines (nurses, doctors, PTs, various seminars and such) so can be absent for random day or half day here and there.

Then don't forget that they are also required to deal with trauma for a week at a time, the frequency depending upon how many colleagues they have. So a department of 6 consultants will do a 1-3 rota (two consultants needed to be on call 24/7 at all times). A department with 10 consultants will do a 1-5 rota. During that week, if they have a major trauma case such as a complex fractured pelvis, they could unexpectedly be in theatre for the whole day and tough luck on the scheduled clinics.
 

RestAssured

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So if you pay privately,do you get to the the consultant faster? Does money make a difference?
 

Josephine

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But she's only having the consultation privately and the surgery on the NHS, so still a bit of a wait. And sometimes there is a sizeable wait to get an appointment for a consultation appointment, like 3 months or more if they are popular.

For a primary consultation appointment with Sarah Muirhead Allwood, the top hip surgeon in the UK and Europe, you can wait at least four months. On the NHS it's six months though you can see one of her registrars earlier. (Her Regs are always top of the tree chaps who go on to magna cum laude type practices at the very best hospitals).
 

RestAssured

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Well over here, if you have insurance, you usually pay a certain per cent for the year. I met my 3,500 deductible for the hospital, with the knee in a fast hurry. Some have higher deductibles, some lower. We have Medicare for the people over 65 I think it hasn't changed to 67 yet, but if I m wrong someone will correct me. We have Medicaid for the people who are low income. So for the people in the middle who work, but don't meet any criteria, they have to work out a payment plan. OS's see everyone on the same basis except for Medicaid usually. The people on welfare usually have to search for doctor's to accept them.
 

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Sonja, it's Social Security payments that are edging upward gradually to begin at age 67. Medicare is still available for everyone starting at age 65. They are two totally separate government programs.
 

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Scarlett....so sorry we have derailed your thread a bit. We'll get it back on track now.

Good luck and keep the pressure on!!!
 

RestAssured

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Sonja, it's Social Security payments that are edging upward gradually to begin at age 67. Medicare is still available for everyone starting at age 65. They are two totally separate government programs.
Thanks Jamie, I'm not old enough to know, and right now I would never qualify for Social Security.

Scarlett,

I am also sorry that we derailed your thread! I hope you can see a consultant soon, who will care about you as a person, and that you can have the knee replacement to make you feel better! :happydance:
 

Knitter4444

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Since so much of the population today is overweight I bet that more people who undergo joint replacement are probably not at their ideal weight. I weighed about 220 when I had my replacements and only 5'2". Weight never mentioned. My gosh I am more concerned about cardio issues from not being active than I would be about joint replacement and recovery.
 
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