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Tommy is finally old enough for a new knee.

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by tommyg, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    I don't have "exciting" accidents that contributed to my knee problem, not with the knee that's getting done anyways. In my mid thirties I first noticed pain in it while moving out of a 3 story house. Lots of steps. It really started bothering me in my forties. Saw an ortho and was told I had arthritis and would need a TKR in the future but 'let's hold off as long as possible'.

    I had an arthroscopy to go in and remove debris and a couple of synvisc injections. The 1st set really helped and gave me relief for 6 months. The last set which was 4 months ago did nothing. The knee has really flared up bad in the past 8 months. Inhibiting everyday normal activities and my biking. My ortho told me the only step left was a TKR.
    I'm 52 now so I've been waiting about 17 years to get this done.

    My next step was probably the smartest thing I've done. Found a new ortho to do the surgery. My original told me it would be done as an outpatient at a surgical center. I was wild about that, the wife had opinions of her own that were well expressed (oh she wasn't happy). I'd had an ACL repair done as outpatient and wasn't wild about the experience.

    I found a well recommended surgeon who had a whole team and hospital behind him who does nothing but knees and hips. No arms, shoulders, necks etc. Just hips and knees. And yes , I would be spending at least 1 night in the hospital.

    I'm set up for the procedure on May 31 and can't wait. I've heard the recovery is similar to an ACL replacement so I'm not real worried. I just can't wait to be able to walk stairs normally again and who knows maybe jog again. (But just on the rare occasion, got to make this last)

    When I had the ACL done I had found a message board with other ACL patients and wanted to find something like that. A little googling and I found BoneSmart. So here I am.

    Seeya.
    Tommy
     
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  2. VonnieN

    VonnieN member

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    Welcome and glad you have done some research. there are others on this page who are very knowledgeable and will share information. what I have gleaned is to not over do it. be as for as you can and have a good mindset to do the work you need to do. it won't repair in five minutes. Good luck
     
  3. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    HI Tommy, and welcome!

    Here is some reading, to help you prepare for your surgery:
    If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
    Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic knee?
    Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

    Regardless of where you are in the process, the website and app My Knee Guide can help you stay organized and informed. The free service keeps all the information pertaining to your surgery and recovery in one place on your smartphone. It is intended to be a personal support tool for the entire process.

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced knee, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
    Stories of amazing knee recoveries
     
  4. Mutti3

    Mutti3 graduate

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    You have wisely picked an OS that does knees/ hips, and a supportive team/ hospital. That was my choice as well. No problems getting refills on pain medication, actually no problems at all. Wish you well!
     
  5. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    That was an arthroscopy and debridement.
    Please will you tell us the date you had that done, so we can add it to your signature? Thank you. :flwrysmile:
     
  6. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    Oh, heck. I can't really remember. Best guess.
    2003-Arthroscopy-Left Knee
    2005-ACL Replacment right Knee
    2008 and 2018-Synvisc injections. Left Knee
    May 31,2018-TKR Left knee. :snork:
     
  7. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    Maybe I should wait till the procedures done but the difference between the 2 ortho's was apparent.
    Original Ortho
    -gave me 3 pieces of paper for the pre-op information.
    -did it as outpatient.
    -only did surgerys on Tuesdays.
    -seemed more concerned about my young age rather than quality of my life.
    New Ortho.
    -gave me a 20 page pamplet of pre-op information.
    -will be staying in hospital.
    -no restriction on surgery day.
    -had me do pre op PT appointment. (Although not sure how much I gained from that)
    -has a dedicated staff including my nurse navigator who I regularly correspond with about pre op prep.and questions.
    -has a pre op joint replacement class which I have to go to.

    Only downside is the new guy is an hour away versus 30 minutes to the new guy.
    I'm feeling pretty good about my choice though.
     
  8. Mutti3

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    Your second OS sounds more like mine. My surgeon does over 400 knees a year. I didn’t do preop PT, but strengthening exercises are very helpful. 30 minutes extra drive is a small price for confident in your surgeon.
     
  9. SusieShoes

    SusieShoes FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Although I never had an ACL replacement, I compared notes with my triathlon-loving son who did have that surgery. Though there are similarities, be prepared for a TKR to be... more. A little more difficult, probably longer, and more challenging on your patience and perseverance.

    One of the most common refrains heard in the TKR Recovery Area (do visit and read some of the recovery threads to get a sense of what your recovery will be like) is: "I wish my medical team would have told me what TKR is really like! It's kicking my behind!"

    The best preparation is to learn all you can about TKR recovery, set yourself up well -- good support system (I like your wife already, she sounds on top of things), the right recovery aids (you will want a higher toilet, however you choose to do it, and a good recovery nest or two set up, possibly with a recliner), and a system for icing and elevating your leg, which you will be doing a lot. Like, all the time at first.

    And you will! Walking stairs normally again is one of the great joys of TKR. So is just plain walking normally again. I'm nearly a year out from having both my knees replaced, and I can jog. I choose not to (never was much of a jogger anyway), but I tested it out. Yep. Can definitely jog if I have to! One never knows when the need will arise.

    Hope you enjoy the BoneSmart forum. We're friendly and love to help!
     
  10. nuttybrunette

    nuttybrunette senior

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    @tommyg I can relate to not being old enough. I, too, needed it young. By 30 I needed the right one done...but "too young". Arthroscopic held it at bay until I was 40 and I found a great surgeon to do it. So, it's been 10 years and that knee is the absolute best part of me. You will love it! I'm doing my other one now-waited way too long, but it declined super fast, once it started the downhill slope. Glad you found Bonesmart. 10 years ago it made my fears go away, made me laugh, made me feel normal, well, sort of.... :) I wish you the BEST with your recovery and new baby knee:) :-) (:
     
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  11. Mutti3

    Mutti3 graduate

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    Knee replacement is an equalizer. Everyone wants to get back their prior level of functioning. Younger people have more physical capacity. Older one like me are content to get back to yoga, working out, and brisk walks. To be pain free after a knee replacement is ageless!
     
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  12. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    Help me with toilet :heehee:
    I've got a whole 30 more days to prep so no rush but I'm looking at toilet risers.
    I'm overwhelmed with the choices on amazon. Any body have any recommendations?
    I'm 6"-3" tall (1905 mm for all my Britsh friends. Is that how you all measure height?) and 215 lbs.
    I know I'm going to need one, I actually could use it now. Do they make ones that I can just place on the seat when I go so others in the house aren't bothered with it or do I actually install them?
    The little lady nixed the idea of me actually installing a new comfort height toilet. Said she didn't want her legs to dangle while she's doing her business. (But its ok for me to me in a half yoga pose while I'm doing mine :heehee:)

    Seeyall.
     
  13. Mutti3

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    I got a bedside commode when I discharged from hospital. I took the bucket part off, and place it over the toilet. I have chair height toilets in my house, still a too low after a knee replacement.i am a women’s 5’6”. Check your insurance company and find out what DME equipment they will pay for
    example walker, bedside commode, risers. This are just suggestions.
     
  14. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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  15. slipjoint

    slipjoint junior member

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    Your pretty lean and in way better shape than most of us on the board, I'm sure the picture of 'dip' bar from Amazon above will easily get you through the period you need it. At 6'3" eventually you will appreciate having a 'high rise' model. Unless your lady is pocket sized or a lot younger she will too. I swapped one of ours out a couple of years ago and my wife asked me to swap out all the others after that. The basic models don't really cost any more and only take an hour or two at the most to change out. My live in grandson's feet haven't hit the floor since.
     
  16. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    Yeah, you know the more I think about it the less I think I'll need a riser and could just use something to help me get up. I don't like the idea of any extra seat that would need to be cleaned. (If you get my drift). Right now I'm using the pedestal sink that sits next to the toilet to help me get up. The wife already shot down the high rise toilet. I installed one for my mother house and the wife doesn't like it at all. She's only 5'2" though so a standard toilet to her is like a comfort height to the rest of us.
    Thanks all.
     
  17. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I didn't need a riser at all. You're only having one knee done so you will have a good leg to help you. As long as you have something strong to grab to help, you should manage fine without a higher toilet seat.
     
  18. Roy Gardiner

    Roy Gardiner FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I am going to (slightly) disagree with Celle here.

    Anything that puts force through your knee - like getting up - will hurt. Pain, according to the BoneSmart philosophy, is bad.

    I suspect that a seat riser and/or (I'd go for 'and') a frame as shown above would be cheap, and as nothing in the scheme of TKR. You can then use them or not as you please, and put them to one side after use so that Herself is not inconvenienced. After all that's a major objective in life, isn't it?

    I would hate to read a report here that a 215lb gentleman performed an unscheduled removal of a pedestal sink... :)
     
  19. Mutti3

    Mutti3 graduate

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    Any toilet , regular height chair height is too low to get up after using . As previously said, a bedside commode with the bucket taken out and place it over the commode. But I have to admit, when my husband had his knees replaced a bedside commode was not as useful to him.
     
  20. tommyg

    tommyg junior member
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    Not sure what a bedside commode even is. I'll have to google that.
    Right now I think I'll get a separate stand with handles and than a small riser for the seat.
    I can see that stand/handle device coming in handy later or just re-purposing it later for a home project. (put a piece of plywood on top and would make a nice portable work table.) :loll:Roy I think about the sink everytime I pull my self up. I'm pretty careful. My dad was obese and the things he could break by using them for support was unreal. I had to change out the steering column in his truck because over time the tilt mechanism gave out from him using the steering wheel to pull himself in. And that was made of steel.
     

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