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Toes above Nose?

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by in kneed, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. in kneed

    in kneed junior member
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    Yesterday I had pre-op testing and a surgery info session. The PT told us all about our stay in the hospital and what to expect. She never mentioned elevating our leg so I inquired about it. She said you can elevate it if you want to and/or if you experience swelling. I thought this was odd!!! Don’t you want to prevent swelling and therefore you should elevate?
     
  2. beachy

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    You would think. Someone from Bonesmart should run those pre op classes. I haven't had class yet, but from reading here they seem contrary to the BS way. When I go to my class I'll probably listen to what they say then do my own thing a la Bonesmart.
     
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  3. Niftyknee

    Niftyknee junior member

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    Agree. I was not told to elevate in hospital and I only joined this forum one week post surgery. Intuitively I knew to elevate to help with swelling.... but why don’t they have us elevating in hospital?
     
  4. SusieShoes

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    Classes vary in what they will tell you. And you might get quite different information from the nurses or medical staff treating you in a hospital or rehab setting! It’s amazing, really, the conflicting information about how best to recover from this surgery. :scratch:

    You may well find you get more information on icing because 1) people ask more about it, 2) hospitals use some form of icing, and 3) insurance might pay for ice machines. I haven’t heard of insurance payments for elevating aids and hospitals don’t use them. If they do anything, they elevate the foot of your bed a little (which doesn’t work terribly well) and insist on keeping your legs completely straight. The latter is painful and unnecessary, but that’s what many of us are going to hear. A little bend is more comfortable and will not hurt your knees.

    So do listen — never know what good pointers and tips you might pick up! — and weigh all the information. Taking charge of your own recovery starts in devising your own plan pre-operatively. :)
     
  5. lovetocookandsew

    lovetocookandsew supremo

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    While in the hospital, I used pillows to elevate as I didn't want to bring my Lounge Doctor there. I either had my husband do it, or one of us explained to the nurses how I wanted it done. They would generally just put a pillow under my leg randomly, so I made sure they knew how I wanted it done (the BS way, naturally:)). Because I was in the ICU for 5 days, then on a regular floor as the ortho floor was packed when I needed a room, the nurses weren't TKR-qualified (my term and observation) so we taught them to use the ice machine with frozen water bottles acquired from the ortho ward instead of constantly hauling buckets of ice in, which also required constant emptying of said machine, properly stack my pillows, etc. They all learned a little and I had excellent care my entire stay.
     
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  6. Jockette

    Jockette FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    In my pre op class I was told I would wake up from surgery with my leg up on a wedge, and she had one there to show us.

    I honestly don’t remember if I did wake up with my leg on it, but at some point I saw it in the room with me, not in the bed.

    They did send it home with me. I don’t know if insurance paid for it or I was billed separately. Either way it does the job nicely and I’m still using it 16 months later! I guess I got my money’s worth, it is starting to come apart.

    I was only in the hospital one night, and my nurses were awesome. I hadn’t found Bonesmart yet so I took their word for all they said and did, and looking back I don’t think they did anything drastically different from what I’ve learned here.

    I had a nerve block in my thigh so I wasn’t terribly uncomfortable while in the hospital.
     
  7. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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  8. Laurenkate

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    That was basically the same in our pre-op class. I think elevation was mentioned in passing and nothing was said in the hospital about it. I thought it was very odd because the hospital and nursing staff were amazing and wonderful and very good about making sure there was plenty of ice on it, etc.
     
  9. ArmyVet

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    I never was told about elevation in my knee class, either. I knew to elevate, so I wasn't worried, but at least half the class was regarding blood clots and how to recognize the symptoms and how to avoid them..
     
  10. lovetocookandsew

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    IMHO, most of those pre-op knee classes are basically useless. If they would include actual recovered patients talking about what to expect, how much pain, how long it takes, and so on, maybe they'd be useful. But having a nurse or similar person, who has never experienced one, telling us we we have a (phony) 6 week window, we need intensive PT, or spending a lot of time showing an implant to everyone (and your surgeon may or may not use that one anyway), was useless and wrong. I didn't learn one useful thing at the one I attended, so didn't bother to go this time as all I would have done is argue with the person "teaching" the class!:heehee:
     
  11. Mutti3

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    The preop class I attended the instructor was a nurse who had bilateral knee replacement. It was still a useless class, that required my attendance.
     
  12. lovetocookandsew

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    Mine was actually required also, but my OS got me out of it this time around as he agreed I didn't need it.
     
  13. InkedMarie

    InkedMarie senior

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    My class was a hip/knee combo and I was the only knee person there and at 57, I was the youngest by at least ten years. It was a useless class. If I hadn’t found Bonesmart & a couple FB groups, I’d be really clueless. There was no mention made of elevating, the serious nature of this surgery but they did how the CryoCuff that is used. The RN doing the class said it goes home with us; I was told, twice, by my insurance, that it’s not covered. My original surgeon told me himself to call insurance to make sure.
     

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