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To wait or not to wait

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by jkg286, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. jkg286

    jkg286 new member
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    Ive been encouraged by several doctors to do my double hip replacements sooner rather than later. I need advice on what to do! Here’s the backstory

    At 18 I was diagnosed with a rare blood and bone marrow condition which required a bone marrow transplant. Cue chemo, radiation, and lots of steroids. In 2012 I was diagnosed with avascular necrosis of both hips. I have no hip pain for the most. If I do have pain, it’s more of an aching for 1-2 days. My last MRI showed stage II on the left and stage III on the right. Normally that would mean tons of pain but... I’m not gonna question it. The last MRI was over two years ago :/

    So here’s my dilemma; a few doctors have encouraged hip replacement now, while I’m young (27) as opposed to later. But I’m not in that much pain! Maybe once a month or two. However stage III is indeed pretty close to total collapse.

    I’m in nursing school. I could theoretically get at least the stage 3 hip replaced over the summer.

    What would you do?
     
  2. Pumpkln

    Pumpkln FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    @jkg286 ,
    Welcome to BoneSmart, glad you joined us!
    You are fortunate to be pain free most of the time. There is a score chart in the reading I am going to leave for you. Be sure to fill it out so you can see how you may have limited your activity.

    If you are close to total collapse, which might make the surgery and recovery more difficult, proceeding now vs later may be a good option.

    I am going to tag @Josephine our Director and Forum Nurse to address your concerns.

    If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
    Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic hip?
    Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced hip, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
    Stories of amazing hip recoveries
     
  3. Jaycey

    Jaycey SUPER MODERATOR Moderator

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    Welcome to BoneSmart!
    I had a collapse and I can tell you that you just don't want to go there. The pain is horrid and due to all the limping around for months my recovery took over one year.

    Would your surgeon replace both hips at the same time (bilateral)? One surgery and one recovery! My colleague @Mojo333 had BTHR and it was life changing. Why wait? Get those hips replaced and no more worry!
     
  4. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    Yep, that'll do it!
    The decision to replace is not always made solely on pain levels. The radiographic evidence is just as crucial. So if they say it's time, then it's time!
    8 months is too long to wait. Get it done ASAP and your recovery will be much, much easier. And I agree with Jaycey - try and get them both done at the same time! Also much, much easier!

    Good luck on it all!
     
  5. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    Yep. I'd go for it.
    I have gotten my life back in a big way and would not take any of it back.
    You can do this...!

    Hope you are able to get it done, recover, and live your life hip pain free!

    Hope your holidays are sweet!:reindeer:
     
  6. Going4fun

    Going4fun senior

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    You're probably in more pain that you think you are ... most of us (though we don't have your condition) learn to minimize the pain ... and then the closer we get to surgery, the more we realize we are in pain ... and then after surgery ... we can get even a clearer sense of the previous pain ... because it's gone.

    Also, hip replacement surgeons tend not to recommend the surgery unless you REALLY NEED IT. They typically want for us to be ready before they even recommend it ... That you have surgeons telling you to have it ... that is highly significant.

    I'd say take your anxiety and channel it into finding a really great surgeon and one you trust.
    Keep meeting surgeons until you meet one that has a great record and who really relaxes you, gives you a feeling that you can trust them.
     
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  7. Eman85

    Eman85 graduate

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    I'd go along with the replacement deal now. That being said you say you're in nursing school. A great profession but also one that can be very hard on a body depending on what area of nursing you go into. Just something to consider.
     
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  8. Hip Hip Hooray!

    Hip Hip Hooray! post-grad

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    I had mine done at the same time, and I highly recommend it. I think you will heal quickly. My surgeon advised doing them together, (which he doesn't normally do.) He said that it would be one hospital stay, one time under GA, and one recovery period. It was also cheaper.

    I have healed 100 percent, but can't lift furniture or heavy items. Well, I can, I easily have the strength, but the backs of my thighs feel sore and inflamed for weeks if I do. Then I can't sit and drive for long periods because they start aching. (Like my legs used to do did pre op, because of the arthritis.)

    I hope it all works out for you, and that you can pursue your career. I was advised not to wait, and got mine done within a month of seeing my OS. It helps have an excellent surgeon who is experienced in bilaterals. (if that's what you end up doing.)
     
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