BoneSmart® Hip / Knee Replacement Forum
Knee Replacement & Hip Replacement
Patient Advocacy & Online Community
  1. ATTENTION: Download the new BoneSmart® app today! This FREE app is available for iOS or android phones and tablets and will allow you to connect to the forum on all of your devices. The old Tapatalk app is being discontinued so get the new app now.

    Get The app HERE

    Dismiss Notice

[TKR] TKR in 2014 and now fractured femur

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Recovery Area' started by jenng2003, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    76,199
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    The North
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Quite so, Celle. Well said.
     
  2. jenng2003

    jenng2003 member
    Thread Starter

    Member Since:
    Oct 4, 2014
    Age:
    33
    Messages:
    143
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Country:
    United States United States
    Those arrows are the start. It continues down and left of the arrows (when looking at the picture).

    We’ve been icing since the day of surgery almost constantly. It’s hard and doesn’t move. It impedes ROM. It has stayed about the same size for the last 6-8 weeks. It will not get smaller.

    I was immobilized for over 2 months after the femur surgery. I was limited weight bearing for most of that as well.

    This isn’t a recovery for a TKR. Waiting any longer at this point to try to gain some flexion is not recommended. The knee was done back in 2014.

    This is also a workers comp case so there is not much control I have in the treatment. It has been 13 weeks already. PT has been non-weight-bearing and gentle this entire time.

    PT is concerned since I have PVNS that wasn’t ever addressed properly. Before this fall, I was looking for a specialist to see what should’ve been done to address that issue. The spiral fracture of the femur was the injury this time...not the knee.

    I know there was some shock and trauma to the knee but it has been over 3 months at this point and I have 70 degrees of ROM (and I’ve been stuck at this ROM for almost a month).
     
  3. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    76,199
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    The North
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Well I still think it's a chronically inflamed bursa.
    You say "ROM" but you've only mentioned flexion. ROM (range of movement) is both flexion AND extension. So would you be kind enough to tell me what your extension is?

    Just asking this, not being antsy!
    I know all this - why are you telling me it all again?
     
  4. jenng2003

    jenng2003 member
    Thread Starter

    Member Since:
    Oct 4, 2014
    Age:
    33
    Messages:
    143
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Country:
    United States United States
    The last quote you replied to was for Celle, not you. I have 0 extension as I’ve had for almost the whole time (positive I guess to being immobilized for so long). I struggle to get full extension during PT when I bend (even 45 degrees to 0 becomes incredibly stiff and difficult). What would they do for chronic inflamed bursa? How would it be diagnosed?
     
  5. jenng2003

    jenng2003 member
    Thread Starter

    Member Since:
    Oct 4, 2014
    Age:
    33
    Messages:
    143
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Country:
    United States United States
    I cannot have cortisone shots due to a bad reaction both pre and post tkr. My knee became inflamed and swollen and extremely painful for months after the injection. I also had a poor reaction to Synvisc before the tkr as well. It was so bad that the dr said no more ever.
     
  6. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

    Member Since:
    Nov 19, 2011
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    25,301
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Country:
    New Zealand New Zealand
    All the staff read posts and respond to them.
    What I said about mobilising the kneecap still applies - it isn't necessary.
    A spiral fracture of the femur is major trauma and it will take a long time for complete recovery - just like recovering from a knee replacement.

    It's a fact of life that almost nothing in orthopaedics happens fast. You need to take the long-term view ( and a bucket-load of patience :heehee: ) and wait for nature to do its job of healing.

    I'm not surprised that, at this stage, ROM is still difficult. I guess that your knee was also impacted by the accident and then by the surgery. What happens in one place in your leg is going to have an impact on the rest of your leg as well.

    There's not a lot you can do for an inflamed bursa, except wait for it to settle down again. Certainly, having injections wouldn't be the right thing to do, and I don't think that massage and manipulation will help either. Ask your therapist to leave it alone. Just treat the pain.
     
  7. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    76,199
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    The North
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Oh - sorry!
    It's diagnosed mostly by the surgeon using his intimate knowledge of anatomy, just like I did! And the treatment would usually be a cortisone shot which you can't have, or just a regimen of Tylenol 1,000mg 4 times a day and ibuprofen 200mgs three times a day. And rest, of course.

    In extreme cases, the surgeon might consider excising it if it's got very hard but that's unusual.
     

Share This Page

Sponsors
Close X