THR THR. Ice therapy machine helpful?

Brepp0

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Hello all, my first left hip THR coming up on Oct 14th.
I'm pretty nervous, but greatly looking forward to getting my life back.
I've done lots of reading here at BoneSmart, and it has been extremely helpful in keeping my optimism up, and anxiety down.
Thank you all!

I'm gathering up the hardware I expect to be helpful after my surgery. I've read Ice Therapy Machines are great, but it seems they are used more for knees, than hips. And they're not super inexpensive either..
Would an ice machine be very helpful in my recovery, or just stick with ice packs? I'll have a wonderful helper at hand helping me swap ice packs and whatnot, if that factors in.

Thank you all so much.
B.
 
I am using something called a Thermazone device. It cools (or heats) a very small amount of water to a steady temperature. I wouldn't spend the money on one, but I was able to rent mine from a rehab specialist place. Last hip, I alternated ice packs which were kind of heavy and leaky and annoying. This little guy plugs into the wall, is very small and light, and just uses a bit of distilled water. The unit is suitable for lots of different body parts and comes with a special hip pad which you can velcro around your thigh. I'm sure there are other machines which would do the trick but I really like this one. Worth renting one if you can find one.

ThermaZone - Hot and Cold Therapy, Pain Management, Non ...https://therma-zone.com,
 
@Brepp0 Welcome to BoneSmart! Any source of cold can be used to good effect. I preferred the gel packs but also used old fashioned ice bags for a while. And even once used a bag of frozen peas ... but those do need to be thrown away after use. :ice:
 
I was put on a Breg Polar Pack icing machine at the hospital as soon as I got to my room. I stayed on it continuously and it was a parting gift for playing the THR game. I used it continuously at home if I was sitting or laying down the first weeks. I could use 4 frozen water bottles and fill it the rest of the way with water instead of using loose ice cubes. I could swap out the bottles for another set in the freezer and keep it going. Bottle would last about 4 hours or so. I was given another with my 2nd THR as it's a prescribed item by my OS. I really couldn't imagine getting as much relief as I did with ice packs or frozen peas, but I never tried.
 
I would not want to do this without an ice machine. My caregiver said not to bother she could do the ice packs. But I ordered it anyway. Three days into recovery, she said "I am so glad you got that machine". It is alot to keep up with enough ice packs. More than that Ice packs are to cold for 5 min good for 10 min and then start warming up. Ice machine is more consistent and, for me, the right temp. Lasts for several hours.
 
I've not had my hip replacement yet, but used a Polar ice machine for my knee replacement. I put blocks of ice in the reservoir, made them in Tupperware containers. That ice machine was a huge help.
 
Ice machines were SUPER helpful for the early times. I rented a GameReady system for about the first 3 weeks after my bilateral THR. A bit pricey but it helped a lot.
 
Thank you all for the helpful information! I do really appreciate the info, and it looks like I'll be picking up an ice machine.

Off topic, but related...
My surgeon is well recommended, but he does the the posterior approach, and this is what I'm scheduled for.
I've read there are benefits and drawbacks to each approach, but I'm still concerned this is currently the best way to do it. I guess I'm most concerned about the longer recovery, and possible lifelong restrictions after a posterior.
I have an appt with him Thursday and will be discussing this with him.

Are any of you glad you went with a posterior, or do you wish you had gone anterior instead?
I know, tough to answer, but I'm just trying to do my best here...
Thank you!
 
This topic comes up a LOT and as you suspect, there's no easy answer. A lot depends on the preference of your surgeon. My doc, for example, was one of the early proponents of anterior surgery so I was rather surprised when he told me he would be doing posterior surgery on my hips. I asked him why he changed his methods and he was very forthcoming. Now this is just one doc's take on it and YMMV. He said he gets better visuals with posterior, prefers the instruments used, and the table and equipment used in posterior is less likely to cause an accidental dislocation of an ankle. I had a wonderful outcome with my first replacement, and just went back for more. Outcome wise, I don’t think there's any appreciable difference between the two methods. Yes, the precautions can be a bit off-putting but in the long run, they teach you to be mindful of your movement which is a good thing. IMHO, the most important aspect of this whole adventure is to have confidence in your doc, ask a million questions, and keep coming back here.
 
Lifelong restrictions? I've had 2 posterior THR's basically my OS told me try not to fall down as a lifelong suggestion. I've broken that one but I did fall gently. My avatar isn't an old pic, I'll be out Saturday with the car.
My OS chose the approach, I chose the OS. I had pins in my left and the posterior approach obviously gave him more room to work in the removing of the pins from my femur. My right was supposed to be a "chip shot" as my OS said after my left. Turns out I had a large bone cycst in my pelvis that was unknown pre-op and had to me addressed. Whether he would have seen it if it wasn't posterior I don't know but it all worked out.
 
Don't fall for the hype that one approach is superior to all others. In the end, they all disturb soft tissue, they all have pros and cons, and the one thing none of them do is speed up recovery...it takes the better part of year and even up to two years for your implant and femur to glom onto each other. You can read here on BoneSmart that there are lots of hard or easy recoveries to any of the approaches.
As for restrictions, it depends on your surgeon, the implants and cups he uses, your lifestyle/fitness level, and your recovery in general.
I had posterior and my surgeon doesn't want me to cross center line, to fall, or to get stuck in soft cushy sofas. Those aren't exactly life altering as restrictions go, considering all the activities I'm free to pursue with my new hip :SUNsmile:
 
l too was given an ice machine as part of the recovery with my revision surgery . lt works so well and the one l had , would message the leg by tightening up and then relaxing it . That felt super good !
 
@Brepp0 Trust your surgeon! The approach used has less impact on healing and recuperation than the skill of the surgeon. I had a variation approach - anterior-lateral -- straight down the outside of each hip. I did have hip precautions imposed by my surgeon (no crossing legs or feet, no bending, etc) but those were only in place for 6 weeks. And the only life time restriction he gave me was "NO bungy jumping" which was fine by me as that had never been on my bucket list.
 
This topic comes up a LOT and as you suspect, there's no easy answer. A lot depends on the preference of your surgeon. My doc, for example, was one of the early proponents of anterior surgery so I was rather surprised when he told me he would be doing posterior surgery on my hips. I asked him why he changed his methods and he was very forthcoming. Now this is just one doc's take on it and YMMV. He said he gets better visuals with posterior, prefers the instruments used, and the table and equipment used in posterior is less likely to cause an accidental dislocation of an ankle. I had a wonderful outcome with my first replacement, and just went back for more. Outcome wise, I don’t think there's any appreciable difference between the two methods. Yes, the precautions can be a bit off-putting but in the long run, they teach you to be mindful of your movement which is a good thing. IMHO, the most important aspect of this whole adventure is to have confidence in your doc, ask a million questions, and keep coming back here.

Thank you so much. This and other following responses have really helped me feel better about this thing. It is definitely time for my THR, but I've been concerned that I'm doing it the correct way. My surgeon is well recommended, but the Anterior vs Posterior thing had me worried. I'm starting to feel much better about this upcoming procedure, thanks to you all. I appreciate it very much.
 
Lifelong restrictions? I've had 2 posterior THR's basically my OS told me try not to fall down as a lifelong suggestion. I've broken that one but I did fall gently. My avatar isn't an old pic, I'll be out Saturday with the car.
My OS chose the approach, I chose the OS. I had pins in my left and the posterior approach obviously gave him more room to work in the removing of the pins from my femur. My right was supposed to be a "chip shot" as my OS said after my left. Turns out I had a large bone cycst in my pelvis that was unknown pre-op and had to me addressed. Whether he would have seen it if it wasn't posterior I don't know but it all worked out.
Thanks Eman, from one gearhead to another!
The struggles of hip-pain have sure put a damper in many areas of my life. One that hurts the most (haha), is not being able to enjoy my time under the hood, zone out, and just mentally unwind. It's almost like meditation for me, but when the hip is killing me it just isn't enjoyable. I've got an old FJ40 and VW bug that I've spent way too much time and money on.
That looks like one fast Camaro you've got there, an E-ticket ride I'm sure.
Thanks for your help. :)
 
Don't fall for the hype that one approach is superior to all others. In the end, they all disturb soft tissue, they all have pros and cons, and the one thing none of them do is speed up recovery...it takes the better part of year and even up to two years for your implant and femur to glom onto each other. You can read here on BoneSmart that there are lots of hard or easy recoveries to any of the approaches.
As for restrictions, it depends on your surgeon, the implants and cups he uses, your lifestyle/fitness level, and your recovery in general.
I had posterior and my surgeon doesn't want me to cross center line, to fall, or to get stuck in soft cushy sofas. Those aren't exactly life altering as restrictions go, considering all the activities I'm free to pursue with my new hip :SUNsmile:
Thank you subie. That helps a lot. You guys and gals are being so helpful, and it really is making me feel so much better about all this. I really appreciate it :)
 
l too was given an ice machine as part of the recovery with my revision surgery . lt works so well and the one l had , would message the leg by tightening up and then relaxing it . That felt super good !
An ice machine will be inbound shortly! Thank you for your help :)
 
@Brepp0 Trust your surgeon! The approach used has less impact on healing and recuperation than the skill of the surgeon. I had a variation approach - anterior-lateral -- straight down the outside of each hip. I did have hip precautions imposed by my surgeon (no crossing legs or feet, no bending, etc) but those were only in place for 6 weeks. And the only life time restriction he gave me was "NO bungy jumping" which was fine by me as that had never been on my bucket list.
Thank you!!! I do trust him, but with so much information, parts and methods, it is really easy to wonder if I'm doing the right thing. That's why I'm here talking it out with all you nice people, and it is really helping me get comfortable with what's going to happen. I know you all have been through this, but as a first-timer, there is a lot to think and worry about. I'm sure it will all go well, but this is helping me feel more comfortable with what happening.
Got it, no bungie jumping! I can live with that. Thanks :)
 
As others have said, there are no lifetime restrictions with posterior or anterior. I will have the posterior approach also for reasons others stated. My doctor only does posterior because he gets the best view of the hip that way. I trust my surgeon so that's all I need. There are restrictions but they are only for a few weeks. I suppose after a few years of debilitating pain I should have no problem with a few weeks of restrictions. I dis ask him if I'd eventually go back to life as I know it including horseback riding & he said yes. Riding uses a ton of leg/thigh & hip muscles. I'm going to say if that is still doable pretty much anything is.
I highly recommend an ice machine. Especially for a hip. The ice bladder can be wrapped or maneuvered around whatever body part needed in a way an ice bag or pack can't
 

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