THR Teacher having anterior hip replacement

OP
OP
I

ICWAC

new member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
11
Age
48
Gender
Female
Country
Canada Canada
Thanks for sharing this. It’s exactly the kind of anecdote I was looking for.
 

Layla

Staff member since November 2017
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
29,567
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
We aim to please! :wink: Also, to comfort, encourage and advise when we’re able so stop by often.

This article may also be of interest to you. It’s included in the BoneSmart Recovery Guidelines and while some find it conservative, I successfully used it as a rough gauge to avoid the ODIC (Over Did It Club) that you’ll see mentioned on the forum. It kept me comfortably mobile without overdoing it and stalling my recovery.
http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/activity-progression-for-thrs.13187/

The explanation at the beginning of the Activity Progression article is not something we give a lot of thought to. The physical effort alone that it takes to get ready, then get from Point A to Point B early on is not always a consideration. We tend to envision ourself in the workplace, but forget about the stamina needed once there. Many deal with Energy Drain early on also so I’ll also include an article on that from our Recovery Guidelines -
http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/energy-drain-for-thrs.12415/
Hope this helps!
@ICWAC
 
OP
OP
I

ICWAC

new member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
11
Age
48
Gender
Female
Country
Canada Canada
Another pain question: I’m really trying to avoid any opioid-type meds and make due with just ice, Tylenol, and Advil. I’m also being prescribed Celebrex? I’ve had major jaw surgery, a c-section, and breast surgery in the past and have never taken an opioid.I’ve also been in constant hip pain for almost 10 years and even ran two full marathons without knowing I had undiagnosed hip dysplasia, a torn labrum, and osteoarthritis. Am I underestimating the pain or will I be ok?
 

subie2021

member
Joined
Jul 22, 2021
Messages
248
Age
72
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
There's no way of knowing in advance about the post op pain. Your OS might prescribe some heavier duty pain meds. There's no rule about you having to use them but you might be glad to have them just in case.
My OS prescribed oxycontin but it made me sick, so he switched to tramadol.
Sleeping might be a problem in the early days, as it was for me. I didn't need the tramadol for pain in the daytime, but it really was good for putting me to sleep at bedtime on the rough nights.

Some surgeons wash the surgical area with Exparel before they close, and that gives some pain relief for about a day or two or three, depending. In my case the wound stung, but there wasn't much pain from the new joint which was sore at times but not bad enough that it would have interfered with something I really wanted to do if I had been allowed to do it. Compared to the pain from the bad hip, it was much better.

Best wishes for a successful surgery and a smooth recovery.
 

ravenina

junior member
Joined
Jul 1, 2020
Messages
48
Age
41
Gender
Female
Country
Spain Spain
I’m a teacher. I had my left hip done (anterior) a couple of years ago and it was at the end of the school year so I didn’t have to worry about going back for a couple of months. I was sitting down in restaurants after 3 weeks. My six-week check up, I was good to go, and spent a week at the beach with no pain, acting normally.

I’m hoping for a similar recovery as I wait for my second surgery on my other hip. Just listen to your body.
 

Eman85

supremo
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
2,823
Age
66
Location
E Tennesee
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
I endured my hip pain for almost 50 years and I can take pain. right after surgery when the PT came to the room to get me up to walk I felt great, no need for pain meds so I declined them. We walked the hall with me on a walker. When I got back to the room I was soaked in sweat, I could have folded up that walker and ate it I was in so much pain. Lesson learned and I accepted the first pain pill, half the allowed dosage, and rang for another not long after. I took my pain pills and stayed ahead of the pain and when I didn't feel I needed them I stopped taking them. Not taking the pain pills was a mistake for me and I learned. The next mistake is either taking the pain pills too late after pain started or taking them to mask pain in order to do too much.
 

Hip4life

Staff member since January 2022
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
885
Age
65
Location
Nebraska
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Post op pain is really unpredictable. You can have some surgeries that you experience mild pain. The next one it could be much worse. Different parts of the body, different soft tissues involved, different amounts of manipulation in the OR can all affect the amount of pain sensed. You’ve managed through plenty so far but it really can’t predict post-op. Having also had several surgeries myself, my recommendation would be to make sure you had some big gun pain relief available and not need it than the other way around. Trying to get pain meds after the fact might not be the most pleasant experience.

Most of us would rather not take the opioids unless they are necessary, especially in the light of the opioid epidemic. Do what’s best for you but try not to put yourself at a disadvantage if you don’t need to.
 
OP
OP
I

ICWAC

new member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
11
Age
48
Gender
Female
Country
Canada Canada
Ok. Another question: how much help did people need in the first few days in terms of bathroom stuff and showering? I’m having day surgery so I’ll he home within about 5 hrs of surgery.
 

subie2021

member
Joined
Jul 22, 2021
Messages
248
Age
72
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
A raised toilet seat with handles on the sides was a great help for quite a while, I think 6-8 weeks. I tried going without anything on our 'comfort height' toilet but wound up buying a 3 inch raised seat without any handles, which was used for another six weeks or so. I had a posterior approach so plunking down on the regular seat wasn't good.
You might have to readjust your position to perform post-potty hygiene for a while.
For showering a transfer chair worked very well. My shower is inside a tub with unusually high sides, so we used wood blocks to get the extra height for clearance and to level. I bought a really cheap, about $2, shower curtain that I cut to accommodate the transfer seat, and hung it from a tension rod along with the regular shower curtain set up. That way my bathroom looked normal and not torn up with the cut curtain. I used the seat in the shower for only about a week, but needed it to get into the shower for at least a month.
Everything came from Amazon. Thrift stores might be another source.
There are lots of youtube videos to show how to use it.
It helped a lot to practice using all this stuff before the surgery, including the walker and cane. Being familiar with it, and figuring out work-arounds before being tired, stressed, sore, and drugged eliminated a lot of potential drama. Also, it was helpful to keep TP, moist wipes, soap or body wash,
shampoo, etc all within reach where you don't need to twist or stretch to get to it.
 

Eman85

supremo
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
2,823
Age
66
Location
E Tennesee
Gender
Male
Country
United States United States
At the hospital they had a frame over the toilet that had a seat and arms and was adjustable that worked good. When I got home I had one of those donuts with handles that clamped to the toilet, it was terrible. After the first day or so we found one of those frames, it's a bedside commode with the receptacle removed so it sits over the toilet and is adjustable. That was a lot better and there are loads of them around at thrift stores and on craigslist. Baby wipes are your friend.
I showered the day after I got home as we have a walk-in small shower that worked great, it's small enough you can't fall down. It's fiberglass and I used a suction type handle when I turned around. I used a sponge on a stick for my legs and feet.
 

Layla

Staff member since November 2017
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
29,567
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
We do have the higher toilets in our home and thankfully I didn‘t need a toilet riser. There is definitely no shame in using any of the many assistive devices available if needed. Many are very useful and most love their handy dandy grabber the best! I was anxious to toss those devices to the curb one by one before I even left my surgery site, but my body wasn’t cooperating with that silly notion.

I did have hubs within earshot for the first two or three showers as I was feeling apprehensive. I had thoughts like - What if I slip, or feel lightheaded or drop something I‘m using? The first shower was probably the quickest I took in my life, but possibly the most satisfying after a few days without one. I agree with Eman about having wipes on hand as I used them as a substitute for showering for a couple days until I was over my initial fear. This article is useful if you haven’t had the time to read it yet -
http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/recovery-aids-a-comprehensive-list-for-hospital-and-home.12499/

Not long now until Friday. Wishing you comfort and will be rooting for you!
@ICWAC
 

Giddsy1

member
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
130
Age
50
Gender
Male
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
I had raised toilet seat. As someone else said, I also had and used a sponge on a stick for first couple of weeks. I was not allowed to get my incision wet for the first two weeks, that was a bit of a challenge.

I can remember as layla said it was a bit scary having first shower. getting in and out with crutch at side of shower, then again we soon adapt.

I was a little bit slower in shower at first, though I have 3 teenage children and they wouldn't let me be to long in the shower lol.
 

Klassy

graduate
Joined
Dec 13, 2018
Messages
810
Gender
Female
Country
United Kingdom United Kingdom
For my first shower I took my crutches in with me, and they filled up with water!

I had a non slip rubber mat for the floor of the shower, which was useful. And used a plastic garden chair to sit on in the shower for the first couple of weeks.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
I

ICWAC

new member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
11
Age
48
Gender
Female
Country
Canada Canada
For my first shower I took my crutches in with me, and they filled up with water!

I had a non slip rubber mat for the floor of the shower, which was useful. And used a plastic garden chair to sit on in the shower for the first couple of weeks.
(the crutches part). The garden chair is a good idea.
 
OP
OP
I

ICWAC

new member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
11
Age
48
Gender
Female
Country
Canada Canada
We do have the higher toilets in our home and thankfully I didn‘t need a toilet riser. There is definitely no shame in using any of the many assistive devices available if needed. Many are very useful and most love their handy dandy grabber the best! I was anxious to toss those devices to the curb one by one before I even left my surgery site, but my body wasn’t cooperating with that silly notion.

I did have hubs within earshot for the first two or three showers as I was feeling apprehensive. I had thoughts like - What if I slip, or feel lightheaded or drop something I‘m using? The first shower was probably the quickest I took in my life, but possibly the most satisfying after a few days without one. I agree with Eman about having wipes on hand as I used them as a substitute for showering for a couple days until I was over my initial fear. This article is useful if you haven’t had the time to read it yet -
http://bonesmart.org/forum/threads/recovery-aids-a-comprehensive-list-for-hospital-and-home.12499/

Not long now until Friday. Wishing you comfort and will be rooting for you!
@ICWAC
Already bought the body wipes! And have been experimenting with the grabber and using it to put pants on. Long story short, probably gonna just wear dresses for the first week or two. Speaking of dressing, not to get too personal, but for those of you who had anterior, what was it like to wear undies?
 

Layla

Staff member since November 2017
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
29,567
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
but for those of you who had anterior, what was it like to wear undies?
I’m sure you’ll get some feedback on this. I experienced posterior, but do recall reading here that some with an anterior incision wore the higher cut underwear. French cut, I believe they‘re called? Also some wore the really soft boy short style avoiding any elastic or band over their incision.

There is an assistive device called a dressing stick also that may work better than the grabber. I can’t say for sure because I only had a grabber. Dresses are easy as is any loose clothing like cotton (soft) athletic wear pants, shorts, t-shirts in those first few weeks when you’re not away from home that often anyway. I wore soft athletic type skirts also. Pretty easy on and off.
 

Mojo333

Staff member since August 2017
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Mar 8, 2017
Messages
27,215
Age
58
Location
GA
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Speaking of dressing, not to get too personal, but for those of you who had anterior, what was it like to wear undies?
I don't usually like the kind I ended up using (had to send hubby which was quite the ordeal with me on the phone directing him through Walmart underwear)
but I got the high cut briefs that come high up on your tummy but just right on the leg skirting by the incision.
I had him by one size up....
 

Elf1

Staff member since October 2019
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
2,615
Age
66
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
I had lateral-anterior and I wore mid thigh boxer briefs, had been wearing them for a different reason already. There was no side seem to irritate my incision.

I'm not a dress person so I basically wore elastic waist with tie cotton shorts like you'd wear to work out or run. Hanes, Jockey, Wal-Mart brand, they're soft, easy to pull up with a grabber or dressing stick. And big loose t-shirts was the rest of my wardrobe. I was lucky since my surgery was in summer and living in Texas you can just about wear this year round. Also had some cotton leggings, both ankle length and just below the knee. Elastic waist bands were my friend.
 

CricketHip

Staff member since June 2019
BoneSmart Staff
Joined
Jul 12, 2015
Messages
6,006
Age
67
Location
PA.
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
My first surgery was during warmer months, I opted for skorts.. they were perfect for that anterior incision.
I also had some nice,, soft pajamas that fit loosely and they were great, too.
Cotton, looser fitting leggings, or boy shorts work great,, really anything that is a bit loose will be just fine for you.I am getting so excited for you!

So glad you are asking questions.. there's nothing better than going into your surgery and recovery as prepared as you can be. You got this.. !
 

BoneSmart #1 Best Blog

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
59,687
Messages
1,503,744
BoneSmarties
36,478
Latest member
43fullknee
Recent bookmarks
0
Top Bottom