BoneSmart® Hip / Knee Replacement Forum
Joint Replacement Patient Advocacy
and Online Community
  1. ATTENTION: Download the new BoneSmart® app today! This FREE app is available for iOS or android phones and tablets and will allow you to connect to the forum on all of your devices. The old Tapatalk app is being discontinued so get the new app now.

    Get The app HERE

    Dismiss Notice

Starting this journey - help appreciated community

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by DougUK, Jun 5, 2018.

  1. DougUK

    DougUK new member
    Thread Starter

    Member Since:
    Jun 5, 2018
    Age:
    41
    Messages:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hi Everyone,

    I'm Doug, 41, from the UK and I'm a... ah no wrong thread. What I do have his two bad hips, one very bad. I found out I had severe arthritis about ten years ago but held off as long as I could (rightly or wrongly) to the point of refusing an op on the NHS but now it's got to the point where I really need it done, as I'm limping, can't run (got two young kids) and I'm in pain.

    Just started seriusly looking at all the options that are avaliable - THR vs Resurfacing, types of materials, minimally invasive etc and would welcome any help or advice from you all (if I've missed the thread then apologies - I did try and have a look). Key thing to work out for me is what I want / need and then getting the right surgeon so any advice would be great as it feels a bit confusing, slightly scary and hard to navigate. Any UK people, I have an NHS hospital appointment in July but am also looking at potentially breaking the bank and going private as I'm really keen to get the best chance of being active afterwards (as active as possible anyway) so would love to know any thoughts you have on going private and if it's worth it or not.

    Thanks in advance fellow 'hippies'.

    Doug
     
  2. jaydub63

    jaydub63 graduate

    Member Since:
    Sep 20, 2017
    Age:
    55
    Messages:
    516
    Gender:
    Female
    Country:
    United States United States
    Welcome @DougUK - you've come to the right place! I'm in the US and can't help with the UK stuff, but lots of UK folks on here that can give you great advice about navigating the system. I'm going to tag @Jaycey for you to get you started.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Layla

    Layla FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

    Member Since:
    Jun 26, 2017
    Age:
    61
    Messages:
    6,673
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Country:
    United States United States
    Hi Doug and Welcome to BoneSmart!
    While I'm not a medical professional, given your description of two bad hips, one very bad, and a diagnosis of severe arthritis ten years ago, it sounds as though you're a candidate for THR. I'm sure along with others, some of our U.K. members will weigh in soon. I wish you luck as you move forward with your July appt. and in gathering information to make a decision that is in your best interest. Stop by often, we'd love to support you on the journey!
    @DougUK
     
  4. anny

    anny graduate

    Member Since:
    Nov 17, 2017
    Age:
    67
    Messages:
    755
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kapiti
    Country:
    New Zealand New Zealand
    Hi @DougUK ....welcome to the forum, you'll get lots of advice and support here :yes: I'm no longer in England, but I have seen other people say that you can pay for an initial assessment privately but tell the surgeon you want the actual op done on the NHS. Also I believe that most surgeons do both private and NHS work, so it's not necessarily that private are the best and public are inferior. The most important thing is that you choose a very experienced surgeon, and I'm sure that Jaycey will be able to help you get started on that. July isn't far off, I'm sure you're keen to get all this sorted now so that you can keep up with your children :wink:
     
  5. Cassidy

    Cassidy member

    Member Since:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    158
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hello @DougUK. I haven't actually had my op yet - hoping it will be scheduled for end June/beginning July - but I have a consultant who does both private and NHS work. When I asked him if it would be worth gathering the funds together for a private op (I don't have any health insurance), he said that if I had the insurance he might have recommended going private but, as I don't, unless I particularly want a nicely decorated room/superior choice of meals, I'd do just as well seeing him on the NHS. It was also pointed out to me that if an emergency occurred, I'd end up in an NHS hospital anyway. I thought I'd read an article some time ago saying that by going private I'd get a superior prosthesis, but he said not. So I'm just trusting ..... (Watch this space!)
     
  6. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

    Member Since:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Age:
    54
    Messages:
    7,286
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    GA
    Country:
    United States United States
    :loll:
    And a very humorous fellow too.

    Hope you have a healing peaceful day
     
  7. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    77,190
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    The North
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    With whom and where?
    No it's not worth it. Most of the surgeons who do private work also work for the NHS anyway so it's not really much of a choice.

    Two bits of advice:
    Read this Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    Let me search out a really good hip surgeon for you. I see you are in London but that's quite a big place! So tell me what areas you'd be prepared to go to and I'll look out 2-3 surgeons who do a considerable number of THRs.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  8. SurreyGirl

    SurreyGirl junior member

    Member Since:
    Nov 25, 2016
    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    55
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hi, I went through this thought process too but now have a date with the NHS. I did save up the money for a private op and am now looking on spending it on a rehab place for two weeks after the op. to take the pressure off my husband and have access to painkillers and help! The only thing that concerns me is that when I rang them, they suggested 2x physio sessions a day... I am not sure I want to put my new hip through this so still thinking about it. Best of luck in your decision but, bearing in mind you will only be in hospital for 1-2days with the NHS it is worth going with them if all else being equal.
     
  9. Eman85

    Eman85 senior

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2018
    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    339
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    E TENNESSEE
    Country:
    United States United States
    Welcome and best of luck. I'm not from the UK so school me on how this works. Much of national healthcre we hear in the US is propaganda generated by the money interests. So if you are a citizen you can use the NHS and or buy private insurance and see a Dr. outside of the NHS? It sounds like the hospitals are different if you go private, is that so? I'm guessing the private hospitals are for profit companies?, and the NHS hospitals are gov't owned or are they contractors and the NHS a single payer system?
     
  10. Gidget

    Gidget member

    Member Since:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    157
    Gender:
    Female
    Country:
    Australia Australia
    It sounds like the system in Aus to a certain extent.

    All Australian Residents (don’t need to be a citizen) are entitled to free treatment in a Government owned hospital, known as Public Hospitals. This includes ED, outpatients clinics and inpatients. You do have to pay for any medicines provided on a discharge or outpatient basis but not inpatient. Ancillary Services such as radiology, pathology, physio therapy, OT etc are also free. This is funded by a Medicare Levy which is paid by every person who is eligible to pay tax...so therefore is not charged to welfare recipients, children etc. It’s a good system but has its drawbacks like enormous waiting times and even people dying while waiting for treatment. It can take years to see certain types of Specialists for eg Neurologists and OS. Not to mention the waiting time for procedures and surgeries even after you’ve been accepted.There is the option of seeing a Surgeon in the private system and bypass the Public Hospital waiting list (you have to pay for this and then you get a percentage back through Medicare) The Surgeon then can refer you to the Public system but you still have to wait..it only determines if you need the surgery..and are not wasting your time being on the waiting list for nothing.

    Alternatively, not only do you pay the Medicare Levy but you can buy Private Health Insurance which has different levels of cover depending on the premium. The base cover allows you to choose a private doctor but be admitted to a Public Hospital and there is no extra cost for your hospital stay and the wait is usually a lot shorter. Then it goes up in degrees to the highest cover which entitles you to the doctor of your choice in a private hospital of your choice with partial or full coverage of radiology, pathology etc. This is an extremely expensive option because even though the private hospital is usually fully insured the doctors tend to charge enormous amounts more than Medicare and Insurance combined will pay for...this is known as “The Gap” and it can be tens of thousands of dollars in a worst case scenario.Also radiology, pathology etc tend to have a “Gap” fee as well. The main benefit of private insurance is getting the treatment you need in a more timely manner because private doctors also tend to work in Public Hospitals as well..so no difference in standard of care.

    Medicare also covers GP visits in their clinics. If you are a low paid worker, welfare recipient etc, most GPs just bill the Government for your consultation (known as Bulk Billing) but GPs are under no obligation to Bulk Bill anyone. It’s up to individual GPs to decide whether to Bulk Bill or not. If they don’t Bulk Bill the patient pays the account and then gets reimbursed partially or in full (depending on how much the GP charges) by Medicare. Pharmacy Medicines are largely covered by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (Government) which subsidises the cost to the patient. The cost to the general population for subsidised medicine is around $39.50 which for welfare recipients drops to $5.30

    The same billing principal for GPs also applies to radiology and pathology.

    Confusing?
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. anny

    anny graduate

    Member Since:
    Nov 17, 2017
    Age:
    67
    Messages:
    755
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kapiti
    Country:
    New Zealand New Zealand
    You bet....I'm not even sure I've fully got my head round the Kiwi system yet! From what I recall of the UK system it's probably very similar.....basic NHS, then the pay for a private consult but go back into the public system for treatment, then private insurance $$$. I think it's broadly the same over here too....'public' and private insurance. Public is, as you've said, very slow with looong waiting lists. Private is expensive....we wouldn't have done it if it wasn't heavily subsidised by my husband's employer....now he's not employed the premiums went up a lot :flabber: but we're trying to hang on to it until we've had all our bits and pieces replaced :heehee:. Although it's easy to get the ops done with private insurance (as long as they are medically necessary) it's still not a quick solution....had to wait 6mths for my first hip op, and it looks as if it'll be at least 4 mths for the second from when I book in....the demand for new hips and knees is booming (at least in Wellington) and there doesn't seem to be enough orthopods to go round. Interesting what you said about the insurance companies and the Gap....I'm with Southern Cross which is a NZ company, and you select the level of cover you want to pay for.....so that you might only have surgery cover, but not physio, xrays etc, or you might pay more for limited extra services, or, if you're a Lottery winner, you might have all the bells and whistles! But I think most surgeons charge in line with what the insurance companies pay......presuming if they didn't they have a fairly small catchment of people who can pay out of their own pocket.

    thank you @Gidget for that explanation and sorry @DougUK for diverting your thread.....hope you can get something tied down soon, it's too stressful having choices! :what:
     
  12. Gidget

    Gidget member

    Member Since:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    157
    Gender:
    Female
    Country:
    Australia Australia
    Sorry @DougUK ..just one more comment.

    Anny...it’s opposite here. MOST surgeons charge a Gap...it’s awful. I had $8000 on top of PHI and Medicare for stomach surgery. If I had been able to have hip surgery I expected at least a $3000 Gap, not to forget the Anaesthetists Gap...it just goes on and on. Oh, and don’t forget...I’m a disabled pensioner...no concessions from them there. I have all the “ bells and whistles” Insurance. It’s becoming unaffordable.
     
  13. SurreyGirl

    SurreyGirl junior member

    Member Since:
    Nov 25, 2016
    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    55
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hi Doug... I am with the NHS and was told it was not a lot different than private and now have a date... I may spend some of the money saved on a recuperation place for the first two weeks. Going to see it tomorrow.. Best of luck with the operation - sounds like it is about time... I knew when it took me ages to get out of a chair, could not run, hurt playing the violin as leaning on my left hip in orchestra pits and pain stopping me sleeping properly... All the best of luck to you!
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  14. Josephine

    Josephine FORUM ADMIN, DIRECTOR Administrator

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Age:
    76
    Messages:
    77,190
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    The North
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Except many routine type private hospitals don't have a resident doctor so any untoward incident in the middle of the night requires waiting for the surgeon to get out of bed, dress and drive to the hospital. Hardly what I would call emergency cover!
     
  15. SurreyGirl

    SurreyGirl junior member

    Member Since:
    Nov 25, 2016
    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    55
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Good point Josephine!
     
  16. Bone-obo

    Bone-obo member

    Member Since:
    Apr 28, 2018
    Age:
    65
    Messages:
    217
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Country:
    United States United States
    I love this thread! @Eman85, thanks so much for starting it, and thanks to all for contributing!
     
  17. Ursula72

    Ursula72 member

    Member Since:
    Jan 6, 2018
    Age:
    72
    Messages:
    104
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Burton on Trent
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hello Doug, I’m from the Uk too. If you have the money To go private I would say yes. It will be like a special I treat, having the op and your own private room. I had a private room called an Amenity bed. Do whatever your heart tells you. I know hip ops are scary....but they are for the best outcome you can’t go on with this terrible pain...they’ll a bionic dad when you get new hips
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Cassidy

    Cassidy member

    Member Since:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    158
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Hello @DougUK - I'm another bumpkin from the uk and, like you, wondered whether I should rustle the resources together to go private. I wondered if it would result in a better hip. When I asked my OS he said if I had private health insurance or was in a hurry, he'd probably recommend it, but unless I wanted a prettier carpet or nicer menu, he suggested I stick with the NHS. (He does private work too.). If you find a good NHS hospital and surgeon, then I think that's just as good. In fact my friend went private, had a post-operative bleed, and found himself being blue-lighted to the local NHS hospital!
     

Share This Page

Sponsors
Close X