THR Sports after THR?

DB Wisco

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Joined
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Hello,
I had anterior hip replacement surgery in early July of '23. Recovery has gone well I think. But I'm restless - I used to be very active: biking, hiking, skiing, tennis...etc. But now I'm leery of doing anything but walking. My surgeon & nurse have told me I should never run again. OK, I suppose I can live with that, but not happy about it. I'm told I could golf but will need to alter my swing to avoid twisting. Seems tricky.
While recovering, they put the fear god in you regarding dislocation. I sure want to avoid that. But what I don't know is how long I need to continue being so careful. A year? Longer? I have a friend who's had both hips done & he's super active - down-hill skiing & mountain climbing. He thinks my surgeon's advice is too cautious. I'd love to hear other patients view on this.
Thanks,
Dan
 
@DB Wisco Welcome to BoneSmart! I've changed your thread title so that our members who are back to active lives post THR can come and chat. We have plenty of members who returned to all sorts of sporty activity. Yes, running for most is out just because it can cause early wear of the implant. Having said that, we have a very active marathon runner who had THR. @Constanze Lots of skiing, hiking, biking, golfing members.

It does sound like your surgeon is very conservative. But in the end you need to make the decision about activities. Do slowly ease into anything new.
 
I look at it this way, after a THR or 2 you can do anything you want to do as long as you can accept the consequences. No different than how you should have led the pre-op portion of your life. Somewhere there is a generic chart about dislocation risk/time. Is it accurate? who knows as everyone is different and most of us have done other damage to our bodies and lived different lives. Your friend thinks your surgeon's advice is too cautious, but he's not the one that will suffer your pain, it's all up to you just like deciding to have the operation.
 
@DB Wisco The risk of dislocating a hip is never zero ... not even for a natural hip! But the risk does get much less as you move out of the recovery phase after a hip replacement. Here is the chart that Eman85 mentioned:

1706554904223.jpeg


Everyone is different and each journey through hip replacement is unique. Since you were very active before this surgery you should be able to get back to at least some of your favorite activities.We see many folks here who return to physically strenuous jobs and activities. I was your age when I had both hips replaced at once and when I was discharged by my surgeon he said the only permanent restriction I had was "NO bungy cord jumping!". Best of luck to you .... just start back slowly and enjoy!
 
@DB Wisco Welcome to BoneSmart! I've changed your thread title so that our members who are back to active lives post THR can come and chat. We have plenty of members who returned to all sorts of sporty activity. Yes, running for most is out just because it can cause early wear of the implant. Having said that, we have a very active marathon runner who had THR. @Constanze Lots of skiing, hiking, biking, golfing members.

It does sound like your surgeon is very conservative. But in the end you need to make the decision about activities. Do slowly ease into anything new.
Hi Jaycey. That makes sense. Also, a question about the site here. Is there some way to edit my post so that I get an email alert when someone responds to my post? Thanks, Dan.
 
Hi @DB Wisco and welcome. :wave:

Please let us know the exact date of your surgery and whether it was on your left or right hip so we can update your signature. It's helpful for anyone replying to your posts to have that history available at a glance.

Is there some way to edit my post so that I get an email alert when someone responds to my post?
Click on your user name over on the right side of the blue tool bar. You will see a drop-down menu. That looks something like this. Click on Preferences and you will be able to choose various settings.

1706558222141.png


Let us know if you need anything else!
 
Everyone is different but hopefully your surgeon is in “under promise, over deliver” expectation setting mode. I hope they “get” how important remaining active is to you, and help get you there.

6 months out, hopefully you’re mostly done with “healing mode” and can start thinking about getting strength/fitness back? After my PT wrapped up at ~6 months I got a trainer. She started with a getting a brain dump from my PT, and then the past year of working on strength & flexibility with my trainer 2-3x/week has made a huge difference. One of the best decisions I’ve made.

Definitely figure out and keep up with some kind of structured plan post PT—when PT is over you’re not done, you’re just getting started!
 
Hi @DB Wisco and welcome. :wave:

Please let us know the exact date of your surgery and whether it was on your left or right hip so we can update your signature. It's helpful for anyone replying to your posts to have that history available at a glance.

Is there some way to edit my post so that I get an email alert when someone responds to my post?
Click on your user name over on the right side of the blue tool bar. You will see a drop-down menu. That looks something like this. Click on Preferences and you will be able to choose various settings.

1706558222141.png


Let us know if you need anything else!
Hi. My surgery was 7/5/2023 and it was my right hip.
 
I had my hip replaced and later had to have a revision and then a ligament release. Did your Doctor use a standard hip implant or did he use a duel mobility hip implant? The chances of a dislocation with a duel mobility implant are much lower than a standard implant. I have not had any problems with dislocation and I do a lot of walking and playing golf. As for playing golf after a hip replacement Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson, Davis Love III and many more professional golfers had hip replacements and played and won golf Tournaments on the Champions PGA Tour after their hip replacements and they didn’t change their swings because of the hip replacement. Good luck and don’t be afraid to play golf again when you feel that you are ready for it.



Golfer67
 
Hello! Glad to see all the wonderfully helpful posts! I had my right anterior THR April 8 2022 and I'm now back doing a mostly full regimen of calisthenics/gymnastics type workouts with some yoga/pilates work as well (my surgeon asked me not to tell him what I was doing... :heehee::rotfl: ) . I swim and scuba dive a lot too. I never was a runner but I can and do jog on soft surfaces like the beach :) . However it took about a year or so and then I gradually eased back into things but we all heal differently and at different paces!

I walk A LOT!
 
Wow, I'm so sorry to hear of your frustration. I went to two top surgeons at nationally known and respected practices, and both set no limits--none--on what I can do ....


I was out jogging earlier today. I had some soreness in my year of my first hip. But basically none afterwards. And note: soreness is in the soft tissue. Nothing to do with the stability of the device.

A ban on golf—or more specifically a recommendation against golf? Never heard of that. Never! My sense is that overwhelmingly surgeons are fine with returning to golf, without any adjustment of a swing. It's one of the first things surgeons approve of after hip replacement. I'm wondering if you went to a really conservative surgeon. The surgeons I went to aren't reckless. They're both well respected in their fields. One had done about 5000 surgeries and he could count on one hand the number dislocations. Basically surgeons have figured out to prevent dislocations. Dislocations are not the problem they were 20 years ago. One of the reasons for anterior replacement is the low risk of dislocation, but in reality, surgeons using the other approaches have made adjustments that have drastically cut dislocations.


I would recommend you schedule a followup appointment, face to face with your surgeon. Tell the surgeon of your frustration at not being able to get really active. My guess is that the surgeon is going to support far more activity than you think. I'm wondering if the surgeon meant for you to avoid certain activities for three months and you didn't hear the three months or perhaps the surgeon didn't make clear the three or four months.

The whole reason for hip replacement is to allow people to be active and out into the world. Yes, a good number of surgeons don't recommend a return to running, but that is not the same as opposing running. But almost all surgeons are fine with activity below running, including tennis, golf, swimming, biking, hiking, dancing and on and on.

Good luck. Sorry you're in this situation.
 
Hi @DB Wisco , I, too, understand your frustration and believe your surgeon is extremely conservative. So do get a second opinion. I've had my left hip replacement for 8 years now and I've been running intensively (including 5 marathons and various half marathons) - never had any pain, dislocation, signs of wearing out the device. I had the lateral approach (the incision and access to the hip on the side of my leg during surgery).

The important thing is not to overdo and also to do a variety of sports to get a varied (not one-sided) training regime. I also practice long-distance swimming and long-distance cycling.

The purpose of a hip replacement is that you can pursue your activities better again. so there are certain things I do better now. My gait is now no longer so clumsy (which it was previously ever since my child-hood), I can sit cross-legged again and I'm better at gymnastics, i.e. my leg is more flexible.

I wish you all the best and that you will finally be able to practice golf again :)
 
I also had an anterior thr, and my surgeon also forbid running and a few other of my favorite activities, but there's other things you can do.

Hiking should be fine. And there's outside recumbent bikes if you want to ride but reduce the risk of falling. (I used to make fun of the old dudes with their adult trikes when I was jogging, but now I freaking want one :heehee: ) And I swear I've seen doubles tennis on several lists of things people can do after hip surgery.

I think the important thing is don't do too much too quick. Start with a easier hike and see how it feels before jumping into a 6mile trail. Give yourself recovery time. Maybe practice new golf swings in your yard to feel them out before going to a course.

Idk about the skiing tho. I would have died before surgery on that one.
 
Hey there,

Glad you are doing well. I’m a little over a year out from both of my hip replacements. I was an active runner, played golf, basketball, tennis…so you can imagine my fear at 38 possibly not doing any of that again. So far I have been dead wrong.

My golf game has actually improved. I hit the ball longer. My dad says I have an advantage.

I can full on sprint if I want to. I choose not to for the most part for the sake of my other joints. But I go to the gym and cycle for 45 minutes a day and do moderate lifting…including squats..

My surgeon here in Vegas is actually known across the country. He speaks at conferences and trains other surgeons. His advice was “Don’t do it if it hurts”. Other than that I was told that the new information coming out from the latest hip replacements is that they aren’t wearing out from overuse. He expects mine to last a minimum of 30 years each and possibly forever.

Now I understand that other surgeons will have a different opinion. I just wanted to share my experience. I listened to my body…walked as much as I could, rested when it hurt, and I was back at normal life faster than I ever expected.

Remember not to get too down when it feels like your progress went backwards. Part of the process.

Good luck!
 
Yes indeed, @Rebelguy , hips don't wear out these days. The ball is usually made of ceramic and there is a ceramic lining of the socket so there will be no "abrasion" (previously, the devices were made of plastic and/or metal).

And with some activities, especially those which involve flexibility, you'll improve - gymnastics, golfing, yoga etc. as I said above.
 
My surgeon was both not conservative and very conservative at the same time because of my age. He didn't necessarily say "don't do X sport" but did caution that I'm young and if I want this thing to last a lifetime, to play it conservative. The main thing is not to wear out the joint with high impact activities, and specifically not to fall. Ever.

I generally consider myself someone with great balance and rarely fall, but of course I fell and broke my pelvis in 2022 kickboxing, which partially led to this all.

For that reason, I've personally decided that most sporting activities are off limits to me. Basically, unless I'm in a controlled thing like a workout machine, or functionally stationary (shooting hoops, playing catch, golf, frisbee golf), I'm not doing it. My surgeon essentially agreed with that approach.

I think if I were in my 50s/60s and still active with a 1st time replacement, I'd be less cautious, but I don't want to be going in for a 3rd revision pre-retirement.
 

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