Sport: post surgery

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JMACCA

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Once I have my bionic bits I am keen to know what sports are best to play.

It would be nice to say that I could return to lifting weights, martial arts etc, but I am not sure that it is do-able.

My husband would love for me to play field hockey (both my son and husband play field hockey) - but I am not sure with all the running and bending whether or not that is do-able - it has been SO long since I have been capable of playing sport that I am not sure where to start. I am also afraid of falling over or on to my hips (so Roller-derby is out).

I would love to hear your thought on the limitations, sports that you are playing and whether or not falling is an issue...
 
You really don't have limits on your activity other than what you want to attempt. Many doctors do suggest you stay away from impact sports like jogging, singles tennis, or basketball. But quite frankly, people do what they want to in order to have a satisfying life. You won't want to start any strenuous sports for at least a year out. The best thing is to start slow and see how you feel. Pay attention to how your body reacts as you're playing the sport and in the few days afterwards. Don't do things that make you hurt. This is not the time to try and "work through the pain." Pumpkln is right....you'll see people doing a lot of active sports after their hip replacements in that forum.
 
Oh my @JMACCA the stories you will hear about people who fell onto their hips and survived with no damage. I have fallen smack onto it about 5 times since it was 8 months old. No damage to hip. Dignity and metatarsals and back not so much :lol:


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We have many members who returned to the sports you are want to do. But Jamie is right - you need to ease into these activities. At first you may be sore and stiff. Muscles haven't been used in awhile. Build up the activity level slowly.

On the subject of falling - a 60mph wind literally knocked me down directly on my right hip. Landed directly on my lateral scar on concrete. I was sore and stiff for several days and the bruise was a beauty. But no damage. These implants are tough!
 
Can't comment on falling as I haven't done that yet. Been 1 year and 1 month since my RTHR. At my 1 year follow-up I got the ok to pretty much do anything. My surgeon still didn't think distance running was great. I'm lifting weights (just progressing slowly and carefully with squats and deadlifts), boxing, and walkng lots. Will be cyling more now with the nice weather. Up to surgery I had also been doing ju-jitsu and yoga. Have been told I can do both but time, money, and really I don't feel the need for either right now.
 
You won't want to start any strenuous sports for at least a year out.

That is really good to know @Jamie!

Landed directly on my lateral scar on concrete. I was sore and stiff for several days and the bruise was a beauty.

OOOWWWW!!!

I'm lifting weights (just progressing slowly and carefully with squats and deadlifts)

Oh that is awesome to hear! I love lifting weights and especially doing squats...I was worried they would be forever gone!
 
I have been conservative with what I'm doing since having both hips replaced. I walk, ride my bike, swim, and use light weights on the machines. I also do some Pilates. I have friends who have had this surgery who returned to dancing professionally. Their goal was to get back to the level they had achieved before needing the surgery. They were able to, until they turned about 60. Then they had major problems with their knees, their gait, and many of them needed revisions.

Juliet Prowse had both of her hips replaced, after which she stopped taking ballet classes, and switched to yoga. She walked her dogs every day, and did shows that required more singing and acting, and less dancing. She only lived to be 63, but her body looked like a 25 year old. Her knees hurt, but she didn't need surgery.

I would be cautious about those activities that you mentioned. It's your decision, but I think sometimes people don't think about the big picture. I just visited a friend in NYC who is 58. He had his hip replaced at age 47, and the other one resurfaced. He danced hard in Lion King after that, and then had a bad accident in The Little Mermaid. (He fell 40 feet.) He is now hobbling with a cane, completely bent over, and in constant pain. It's really sad. He just bought a wheelchair. When I was with him I was constantly afraid that he was going to fall.

I'm sorry, I don't mean to be negative, I just think it's also wise to adjust your physical activity. I know many others don't agree with me, this is just what I've decided to do, based on the older dancers that I know. I think there are a lot of activities that you can do, safely.
 
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I'm sorry, I don't mean to be negative, I just think it's also wise to adjust your physical activity.

You weren't negative at all, I think that is it really valuable to have another point of view. Going back to serious sport (I do tend to go overboard) is somehow not resonating with me - so I think that I will follow my gut - but it is interesting to see what people have gone on to do in their sport.
 
I was one who tended to go overboard, too. That's how I wore away all of the cartilage. I'm glad to hear you are going to follow your gut. It's actually been really exhilarating to be able to zoom around on my bike, take a hike, exercise my dogs, and practice yoga. I had to wait eight months before using the machines at the gym, but am very happy to be able to do that again. (I have to keep the weight really low, and I only do half the repetitions I did pre surgery.) I bet you will be able to work around the hips and still find work outs that stimulate you.

Oh, I just saw that you are 43. I was still pushing my body very hard at your age. Many women tend to have joint problems after about age 50. I think it's related to their periods stopping. The body chemistry is different. You can still be in great shape, but I've found I do different exercises to get there.
 
I was one who tended to go overboard, too.

Oh, I just saw that you are 43. I was still pushing my body very hard at your age.

Yep - I pushed through my 20's too hard as a martial arts instructor and a gym instructor so I completely understand - it was 6-7 days a week most weeks. Now I am the opposite, barely moving a muscle. I do get very envious of those running and driving past the gym.
 
I was the same way. I think you will recover very well. I take a different approach at the gym now, but I'm happy to be there.
 
I think you will recover very well.

I am quite overweight and in terrible shape now so I am a bit concerned - I will be having both hips done possibly either bilateral or a week a part so I am a little concerned about getting up and about - but you have been there done that! :)
 
The muscle memory is there. You were in great shape, so i think you will be again, in time. We all just do what we can. Eating well helps. I struggled to swim before my surgery, but was able to use a kickboard and walk in the pool. I'm sure you'll lose the weight. I joked that food became my best friend after my surgery. I really looked forward to treats.

I hope you are able to get a bilateral, if you want one. I was so pleased with mine. Keep me posted. What is an FAI?
 
I hope you are able to get a bilateral, if you want one. I was so pleased with mine. Keep me posted. What is an FAI?

Yes, a bilateral is what I would prefer, absolutely. If I think about what that actually is (i.e. they chop the tops of both of your legs off) I start to get real nervous :scare: So I try not to think about it that way! There seems to be reluctance to do bilateral, but I am not afraid to ask for it.

FAI is an is where there is too much friction in the joint - I have the Pincer form (bilaterally) which is where "the situation where the socket or acetabulum has too much coverage of the ball or femoral head."* Because I have deep sockets and FAI, a hip replacement is really the only option. I have extremely poor range of movement because of the deep sockets and too much coverage. Apparently it is something that is seen in young athletes quite a bit.


*description from this website
 
I looked at the website. I can see why it's common in high level athletes. I was lucky that my surgeon recommended the bilateral surgery. He doesn't do them that often, but I guess I was a good candidate. Either way, it's good that you're dealing with this and getting your hips fixed.

My close friend told her surgeon that she didn't want to know what he was going to do. She didn't have any pain afterward, just stiffness. It sounds weird, but it's a relief to have that arthritic joint removed. My friend described it like having a cancer taken out of her body. She said noticed the difference immediately, when she woke up from the surgery. It's amazing how the body adjusts.
 
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