THR Solar7's LTHR Recovery Thread

I still have my Walker- tennis balls on the back helped me. Also a PT adjusted where the front is slightly taller than the part where I stand. My other hip is also unhappy so I am not quite ready to ditch the Walker. These tweaks really helped my walking. Sorry you have not been given the green light.
 
I still have my Walker- tennis balls on the back helped me. Also a PT adjusted where the front is slightly taller than the part where I stand. My other hip is also unhappy so I am not quite ready to ditch the Walker. These tweaks really helped my walking. Sorry you have not been given the green light.
It's not that I haven't been given the green light... just no one is looking or making any suggestions. I keep bringing the cane up to PT and they give me non-answers. Not very happy with that.
 
I had been using mine at the wrong height for 2 weeks before first post op appointment. You may need to as your surgeon.
 
@Solar7 Do you have a cane to use at home? You just need to be sure it is the right height for you. Use it around your home before using it outside just to be sure you feel steady. It really is an individual choice about when to use a cane vs a walker.

If you are not sure the cane you have is the correct height you can find videos about that on YouTube and general info with a simple Google search
 
@Solar7 Do you have a cane to use at home? You just need to be sure it is the right height for you. Use it around your home before using it outside just to be sure you feel steady. It really is an individual choice about when to use a cane vs a walker.

If you are not sure the cane you have is the correct height you can find videos about that on YouTube and general info with a simple Google search
I have two canes that seem to be the right height per videos... I will say that before the surgery, when I was using them, they felt VERY unstable and useless for any kind of balance. But I'll try them, or one crutch.

The walker feels like major overkill right now.

I don't intend on going outside with the walker or cane unless I have an appointment, so I'm a long way from worrying about that. That's like 70% vanity, 30% fear of falling, hah.
 
Hi @Solar7 Sorry if I'm just jumping in here as I might have missed some information in a previous post but you mention still using your walker and then going on to a cane, which I'm assuming is a walking stick, would you not be better off progressing to 2 crutches and then one crutch afterwards before using a cane. I'm now on one crutch quite happily indoors but wouldn't fancy using only my walking stick just yet.

I would also mention that after my op the hospital sent me home with crutches, no mention was made of needing a walker but I decided I wanted one as well. Then at my first physio appointment, it was the physio who wanted me to move from 2 crutches to one, which I'm glad she did as I prefer it now but I am further along than you. There might be a very good reason why they're not moving you off the walker, maybe they are acting on your surgeon's instructions (I found that a lot whilst I was in hospital, the staff were constantly checking who my surgeon was so that they followed his specifications regarding restrictions etc) Maybe you could contact the surgeon direct to find out what his views are about assistance aids ?
 
@Solar7 You really don't need any clearance to transition to another walking aid. It's all about what feels right for you. I found one crutch felt secure for me post my first THR. Then a cane when I was feeling more confident. There is no timeline for this.
 
Hi @Solar7 Sorry if I'm just jumping in here as I might have missed some information in a previous post but you mention still using your walker and then going on to a cane, which I'm assuming is a walking stick, would you not be better off progressing to 2 crutches and then one crutch afterwards before using a cane. I'm now on one crutch quite happily indoors but wouldn't fancy using only my walking stick just yet.

I would also mention that after my op the hospital sent me home with crutches, no mention was made of needing a walker but I decided I wanted one as well. Then at my first physio appointment, it was the physio who wanted me to move from 2 crutches to one, which I'm glad she did as I prefer it now but I am further along than you. There might be a very good reason why they're not moving you off the walker, maybe they are acting on your surgeon's instructions (I found that a lot whilst I was in hospital, the staff were constantly checking who my surgeon was so that they followed his specifications regarding restrictions etc) Maybe you could contact the surgeon direct to find out what his views are about assistance aids ?
I think this is a difference between treatment across countries (something I feel I actually have some insight into since I spent time in hospital in the UK last summer for a broken pelvis). We don't really use crutches for this operation here. The docs want me standing and weight bearing on the operated side, whereas crutches would involve my operative leg not touching the floor. Also, in the states, we commonly use an underarm crutch whrreas in the UK they gave me crutches where I use my arms to bear most weight.

I'd be fine moving to one of the arm crutches or the cane, I just worry I'm becoming very reliant on the walker, and putting my weight on it or failing to get a good stride. It's more of a shuffle than a walk.

No one is monitoring my progress on the walker, which is annoying and why I need to kick up some dust on it today and ask for answers. My surgeon operates independently of the hospital, as does PT, so they know exactly who my surgeon is and how to call him. There's no restrictions from him that I know of.

I texted my surgeon's office to see if I could proceed to a cane and all they did was ask me if I was going to PT and told me I could do home exercises if I want. Very little cohesion.

It very much worries me to hear people are/were ahead of me (especially with respect to age, which I hope isn't offensive). I just feel that as a relatively healthy 37 year old I shouldn't be this far behind the curve. My surgeon mentioned that some people walk into his office at 2 weeks unassisted and I'll be pushing in on a walker which might concern him.

@Solar7 You really don't need any clearance to transition to another walking aid. It's all about what feels right for you. I found one crutch felt secure for me post my first THR. Then a cane when I was feeling more confident. There is no timeline for this.
Thanks. I'm going to ask them to push me a bit at PT today, or at least test it. I'm bringing a crutch and cane. If they tell me no, I'll need a good answer about why they think I'm not capable, as I've been easily doing every assigned exercise.
 
Good luck today! I try to use a light grip on my Walker which hopefully helps. I had a cane pre-op and never felt I mastered it. I would get in a hurry and accidentally leave it somewhere. Again good luck at PT.
 
@Solar7 Dear fellow, you know the song "You can't hurry love"? Well substitute healing for the word "love"! You really can not hurry healing from a major surgery! You are just 11 days along in a healing/recuperation process that can take months to complete! This is NOT a race. Your body has been through serious trauma and the healing goes way beyond just the incision in your hip.

Yes it can be confusing when you get different information from different sources .... but the choice of moving from walker to crutches or cane is a very individual one. Do what feels best to you - try around your home and see which has you feeling the steadiest and then keep on keeping on. You will get to where you want to be. Oh and please don't compare yourself to anyone else .... just you do you!
 
I think this is a difference between treatment across countries (something I feel I actually have some insight into since I spent time in hospital in the UK last summer for a broken pelvis). We don't really use crutches for this operation here. The docs want me standing and weight bearing on the operated side, whereas crutches would involve my operative leg not touching the floor. Also, in the states, we commonly use an underarm crutch whrreas in the UK they gave me crutches where I use my arms to bear most weight.
Thank you for explaining this to me, I had no idea that the 'crutches' wouldn't be the same. I have actually used underarm crutches as child but it seems most people I see in the UK are now on elbow crutches.

I hope you get some satisfactory answers at your physio session today.
 
Well, PT didn't really answer my questions about the cane... the lead PT wasn't available and I became impatient waiting for her after my session, so I'll wait until Monday to ask again, or my surgeon on Tuesday. After PT I had my dad take me to a private walking area to play some Pokémon Go for a bit, and he brought the wheelchair which I retired to for the walk back to the car... but I got good distance. I still can't really walk outside much but I suppose that mixed it up a little.

At PT I'm doing heel slides, baby squats, tiptoes, leg squeezes, and bridges, which seems like a lot, but I'm completing them with ease. I'm a little concerned about dislocation risks because the hospital's restrictions say no bridges, but PT assured me they do this with all of my surgeon's anterior patients. Everything is so easy that it makes me feel like I should do more.

The PT associate did give me clearance to try walking unassisted next to a countertop for support. With that and the extra usage from yesterday, the surgical site and the joint are reminding me that they're there... not particularly painful, but some discomfort. I was worn out enough yesterday to take my first nap post-surgery, and I'm weaning off of the pain pills.

My current biggest frustration is feeling very stiff from laying and sitting in the same position all the time, and not being able to stretch out properly for fear of dislocation. Second, I'm going stir crazy. I'm sick of the same house and only having my parents to socialize with outside of small talk with the PT providers, but such is life. Videogames and TV are filling the time so I'm not bored, but I like talking, hah. I'm working on steeling myself for that to just be a fact of life until 4-6 weeks from now. I sure do miss my house... but maybe in November!

At least there's football today and tomorrow!
 
I'm a little concerned about dislocation risks because the hospital's restrictions say no bridges, but PT assured me they do this with all of my surgeon's anterior patients.
I wouldn't do them then. Take your surgeon's advice over the PT's. We advise against them because,
Bridges - can cause generalized tendonitis particularly in quads, glutes and hamstrings.
Why risk it? You can say, "No".

What about board games or cards with the parents to break up the monotony? Or a puzzle you all take turns working on?

Enjoy football tomorrow!
 
I'm a little concerned about dislocation risks because the hospital's restrictions say no bridges, but PT assured me they do this with all of my surgeon's anterior patients.
I wouldn't do them then. Take your surgeon's advice over the PT's. We advise against them because,
Bridges - can cause generalized tendonitis particularly in quads, glutes and hamstrings.
Why risk it? You can say, "No".

What about board games or cards with the parents to break up the monotony? Or a puzzle you all take turns working on?

Enjoy football tomorrow!
I'll follow up with my surgeon on it - his rules don't match the generic rules the hospital gave me in a packet. But I'll text them Monday before my next session.

My parents are very set in their routines and don't really enjoy many shared hobbies besides maybe watching a show together, or football. It's not a problem, it just is what it is. I have my video games, thankfully, but nothing really replaces the socialization with friends I'm missing. I just have to grit my teeth and wait until I'm healed to see people and do things.

I think today has been the start of the post-op blues. I'm out of the initial heavy pain stage and now in the "just wait it out" phase as I try to heal. I'm hoping that by say, Thanksgiving, I'll be able to venture out to see people. That'll be just after the two month mark.
 
I'm a little concerned about dislocation risks because the hospital's restrictions say no bridges, but PT assured me they do this with all of my surgeon's anterior patients. Everything is so easy that it makes me feel like I should do more.
Please don't do bridges. They are for building core stability and only make new hippies feel sore and stiff! I don't agree with your PT. They should not be doing anything that is not recommended by your surgeon. Just say no!

Is there any reason why you can't go home now? You sound like you are getting around well. With a little help in preparing your home for your return you should be fine on your own. Many of us recovered with little or no help post op. Get your parents to help you do a shopping trip for ready meals, frozen food and snacks you enjoy. Have them put things you will need regularly within reach. A change of scenery and a bit of independence might be just what you need.
 
I'm a little concerned about dislocation risks because the hospital's restrictions say no bridges, but PT assured me they do this with all of my surgeon's anterior patients. Everything is so easy that it makes me feel like I should do more.
Please don't do bridges. They are for building core stability and only make new hippies feel sore and stiff! I don't agree with your PT. They should not be doing anything that is not recommended by your surgeon. Just say no!

Is there any reason why you can't go home now? You sound like you are getting around well. With a little help in preparing your home for your return you should be fine on your own. Many of us recovered with little or no help post op. Get your parents to help you do a shopping trip for ready meals, frozen food and snacks you enjoy. Have them put things you will need regularly within reach. A change of scenery and a bit of independence might be just what you need.
I think we're having a miscommunication on the recommendation. The hospital gives out generic restrictions that are not my surgeon's recommendations. I was commonly instructed that I had posterior-esque restrictions and my medication suggestions did not match with the surgeon's. PT is telling me that the bridges are recommended by the surgeon. I will continue to check.

It's not yet time to go back home. My downstairs has uneven saltillo tile, my bedroom is upstairs (I haven't worked on the stairs yet) and isn't very spacious for a walker, my bed there doesn't adjust for me to elevate like mine here, and when I go home, I can't take it back, as everything needs to be packed, taken home, and set up.

The plan all along has been to stay here 2-3 months, off any walking assists, until I'm really shining and completely independent. This is also important so someone stays on top of me about going to physical therapy, as I'm likely to cancel or discard home exercise.
 
Hi! I’ve been reading this with interest. When I came out of hospital I was given two crutches, elbow height. At the recovery home where I was for 10 days we had to use the Walker in our rooms just in case of a fall at night but during the day we’re encouraged to use crutches. Managing stairs with one crutch was taught fairly early on (it’s easy!) as was managing steps to the house. Although I could do bridges I requested not to have to do them as it aggravated me as would anything involving strech bands at this stage.

Most of my physio has been walking with two crutches and concentrating on keeping my back straight and heel to toe walking . My garden at home has grass, concrete and uneven paving stones (thinking of your tiled floors)! On week 7 I am now using one crutch most of the time. I’m not bothered about using a stick until I feel more stable and confident.

I think my recovery is “average” this time . Maybe next time you have physio ask about using crutches as eventually you find your legs take most of the weight and the crutches are used more for balance. It does feel more natural than a Walker ..

Best of luck with your recovery!
 
Hi! I’ve been reading this with interest. When I came out of hospital I was given two crutches, elbow height. At the recovery home where I was for 10 days we had to use the Walker in our rooms just in case of a fall at night but during the day we’re encouraged to use crutches. Managing stairs with one crutch was taught fairly early on (it’s easy!) as was managing steps to the house. Although I could do bridges I requested not to have to do them as it aggravated me as would anything involving strech bands at this stage.

Most of my physio has been walking with two crutches and concentrating on keeping my back straight and heel to toe walking . My garden at home has grass, concrete and uneven paving stones (thinking of your tiled floors)! On week 7 I am now using one crutch most of the time. I’m not bothered about using a stick until I feel more stable and confident.

I think my recovery is “average” this time . Maybe next time you have physio ask about using crutches as eventually you find your legs take most of the weight and the crutches are used more for balance. It does feel more natural than a Walker ..

Best of luck with your recovery!
Thanks! Crutches are discouraged here and not given for any part of the recovery... I think it's a difference between the US and the UK. I have some crutches from my pelvic fracture last year, but they're not anything PT or doctors have planned for.

I hope to be away from all assistance by week 8... all I can do is hope. Thanks for the encouragement!
 

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