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Seeing the Surgeon in early December

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by denn, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. denn

    denn
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    I shall be 62 in December when I see my surgeon next. For the past three years he has put me off by telling me to lose weight. He also tells me my legs are quite chunky for which would be another stumbling block in performing TKR. He also constantly expresses that I'm too young to undergo the op as he would prefer me to be around 70? Surely quality of life should come before age?

    Each December I visit the hospital, have xrays then a short meeting with the surgeon. I do recall last year him telling me he's be happy do the job but kept warning me of the problems it can cause. Each time this has put me off and each time I return home and suffer when walking.

    This year so far especially since August my knee has kept me awake many nights and gives me a lot of pain whilst sat. My movement has severely become limited which now I am going to ask him to do the TKR.

    I do have both knees that are bone on bone but the right one is worse. Is 62 too young or is the surgeon just trying to put me off?

    Kind regards Dennis
     
  2. jaschembra

    jaschembra

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    Hello Dennis. Others will come along to give you some reading materials, but I can say just a few things... I'm not sure if there are medical requirements in the UK; however, I'm 56 and had my first knee replaced this past Jan. I think everyone will tell you - if your doctor will not do it, find another (qualified) who will. You are definitely not too young (your bionic knee should last long enough) and you are definitely suffering quality of life. I wish you well on your visit.
     
  3. SusieShoes

    SusieShoes Forum Advisor

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    :welome: Dennis! We're glad you are here for information on your surgery.

    Your surgeon may genuinely believe you're too young, though he's mistaken. That belief was the practice decades ago, though current implants last 30-40 years. My surgeon said he really didn't know how long mine would last -- the ones he put in 20 years ago are still going strong and mine is much newer and better. I'm only a few years older than you and the question of my age never came up.

    While it's also true that losing weight is good both in advance of a TKR and after, you can get a TKR even if obese. Some doctors will not operate on people above a certain body mass index (BMI), but others will. If your surgeon will not do the surgery because of your weight, you can look for another surgeon who will do it. Living with constant pain and immobility takes a toll on your health. I'm overweight and my surgeon didn't even blink. I've also had an excellent recovery. So being hefty does not rule out good results!

    Here's some reading that should help you make your decision and aid your discussion with your surgeon:

    If you have concern about pain with this surgery, Plan For Pain can be helpful for having this discussion with your medical team.

    New BoneSmart members like you are in various stages of their journey to joint replacement. Making the decision whether or not to have surgery and preparing for surgery can be easier once you have done your research and know what lies ahead. Here are some tools that can help you decide what is best for you.

    If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:

    Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic knee?
    Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
    BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
    Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

    If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:

    Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
    Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
    Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

    Regardless of where you are in the process, the website and app My Knee Guide can help you stay organized and informed. The free service keeps all the information pertaining to your surgery and recovery in one place on your smartphone. It is intended to be a personal support tool for the entire process.

    And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced knee, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:

    Stories of amazing knee recoveries


    If you have any questions, fire away - we're here to help.
     
  4. Arttie

    Arttie

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    Since you are in the UK, Josephine may have some advice for you, if a Moderator will tag her
     
  5. SusieShoes

    SusieShoes Forum Advisor

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    Here's a tag for @Josephine. She's our Nurse Director and, as @Arttie notes, might have some extra insight into your situation.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Celle

    Celle Forum Advisor

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    The idea that you have to be "old enough" to have a nee replacement is very old-fashioned. Nowadays, knee replacements can last for 30-40 years, so there's every chance that one done now will outlive you.

    I hope that Josephine can help you to find another surgeon - one who is prepared to help you.
    You'll need someone who looks at the state of your knee and the impact that has on your quality of life before he looks at your age.

    This is the only way you are too young:
    • You are too young to be living your life in constant pain.
    • You are too young to have your mobility so badly compromised.
    • You are too young to be giving up the lifestyle you enjoy.
    • You are too young feel so old.
     
  7. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    For sure you are too young to be suffering bone-on-bone knees! We've had members of the ages of 30 and even 20 have knee replacements so he's very wrong! As a matter of interest, which hospital going to and which surgeon are you seeing? Quite likely I can suggest a surgeon who is more in touch with the real world!

    As for your weight, would you tell me your height and weight so I can calculate your BMI? Unless you know that, of course! There's been a lot of changes in the NHSof late and it is now being run by CCGs (Clinical Commissioning Groups) and there has been a lot of kerfuffle because some of them have dictated a maxiumum BMI before people can have surgery. All sorts of conditions are included - joint replacement, gall bladder surgery, hysterectomy, hernia repair, varicose veins and lots more. There's no medical rhyme or reason to it, it's nothing more than a financial constraint.
     
  8. denn

    denn
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    Thank you so much for the replies. This surgeon wasn't the one I'd have seen if I had the choice.
    I forgot to mention that I do go to the gym three to four times a week where I put in an hour of strenuous work outs. I don't use the tread mill as it's pounding. I use cross trainers and rowing. I also do weights. Since my first visit to this surgeon I have lost two stone but, he expects more. I can only do so much with a disability.

    I am scared to a point where I always look on the dark side of things. I don't really know many who have had TKR but an Uncle aged 82 has had both done a few years ago but one that went better than the other.

    I would like to see another surgeon but my own GP is very stubborn and not very approachable. The Surgeon that did my Uncles knees doesn't bring age into the equation.

    Kind regards Dennis. Greater Manchester UK.
     
  9. Celle

    Celle Forum Advisor

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    It is your right under the NHS to see the surgeon of your choice. Josephine will probably advise you further, but you can insist on this with your GP. Don't be intimidated by her. If you want to see a different surgeon, you have to take control of this.
    NHS choice: Patient's Charter and your right to choose
     

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