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Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home

Discussion in 'Pre-Surgery Information' started by prinny68, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. prinny68

    prinny68 Member
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    Now that I have been through this surgery three times, I found during those few days before surgery I go so nuts, it's nice to have a list of things I need to do/take for the surgery. I am attaching the list I used. I've used it now for all three surgeries and just change/add/delete things as needed based on changes in dates/medications/to dos, and I thought it might be of help to others.... To change the header(at the top) just double click on it and it'll allow you to change the date/place.... And everything else is easily changeable as well..... OR I would be willing to help if someone would like to send me their to-do's if they want! I know everyone has their own way of doing things, but this REALLY helped me!

    The second page is a post-surgery medication page, because I was on SO many medications, I couldn't keep them all straight as to when I took what.... you can just print out multiple copies of that one sheet, have it next to your meds, and then if you forget when you took something, you have a record of it. Especially helps if you have multiple people taking care of you.... :thmb:
     
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  2. Itzdor

    Itzdor Member

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    There were several things I'm so very glad I had in the hospital and rehab and I thought I'd share then with you all. Perhaps you have some indispensable things you used too. Nothing was worse than having everything "across the room!"

    A chain for my glasses. I usually wear contacts, but didn't want to be bothered. The chain was great and kept my glasses with me at all times.

    The other, was a small purse/bag I could wear around my neck/shoulder that held my cell phone, closet key, tissues, etc. Most of my clothes don't have pockets so this was another "must have" item.

    Also, I could bring my laptop to rehab which was great. I also have a Kindle E-Reader so didn't have to bring extra books. I had this at rehab and was able to lock it up when I was out of my room.

    Perhaps others will think of things to add. Best of luck with your surgery/recovery.

    Dor
     
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  3. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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  4. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Pre-prep for the house and for you

    Make sure all rugs are secure so you don't slip. Ensure everything is out of your way and put up so you don't trip over anything.

    Clear away coffee tables and stools to make a clear path around the house.

    Keep easy-to-prepare meals or freeze to reheat. Whatever you prefer.

    Make a list of items you use everyday (groceries, toiletries, etc.) and then shop to bring in enough to last you a few weeks. Stock up the freezer, cabinets and pantry, so shopping isn't needed for a month or so. Not that others can't manage a trip to the store, but then you know you're prepared. That way you won't have to worry about getting to the store.

    Be sure to try and pay your bills ahead of time or at least have them made out and ready to mail.

    Make sure you have your recovery aids (raised toilet seat, walker, etc.) in place before you go - check with your hospital or O.S. office to see what the hospital provides.

    Get a pedicure or have someone cut your toe nails before surgery in case you can't reach your foot afterwards.

    Have your hair done to feel at your best.
     
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  5. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    La toilette!!

    A raised toilet seat with arms has been very helpful to decrease knee pain . However, some surgeons prefer their patients to not use them, believing the movement is good therapy! If this is you, then you do need the frames anyway to assist lowering on to and rising from the toilet

    A "handle bar" frame that goes over the toilet.
    About the toilet seat issue: there should be no need for a riser for knees as the activity is actually good therapy, but you do need a frame around the toilet to help you lower and raise yourself comfortably. You can get standard ones, extra large expanding ones and even one with a raised toilet seat if your own is a little low. But whatever else, you need a couple of strong sides to use when lowering yourself and getting up. Also, in the beginning, stick your operated leg out in front and only use the good leg!

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_toiletqnq.jpg aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_toilethnh.jpg aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_seatriser1.jpg


    You can also get a combination frame and riser seat.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_toiletzsz.jpg


    Still on the topic of toilet we installed new toilets in our home...19". Very user friendly and great for the taller person. These are also called "comfort height" toilets. The larger, elongated bowl (if it fits in your bathroom) is easiest to use.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_talltoilet.jpg



    Stool softeners!!! You also know about prunes, even suppositories...get lots of different things to try. Be prepared with plenty.
     
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  6. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    General Aids

    My sock aid is made of a flexible plastic and I'm thinking easier to use then one made of a hard plastic. Consider getting one like this. It's definitely a must have unless you have someone to help you with your socks all the time.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_sockailfl.jpg


    There is also a device which helps to get your TED stocking on and off on your own

    The Steve!
    Check out the site and its videos!

    The Steve.JPG

    Handy grabber or Helping Hand
    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_helpinwdw.jpg


    Dressing Sticks Get instructions in proper use from your OT (Occupational Therapist) These easily hook onto a towel rod for storage or you could add a string/ band.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_dressingai.jpg aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_dressiaya.jpg

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_dressincn.jpg



    Leg Lifter Essential to help get your now ton weight leg into and out of bed, shower, settee, etc., etc!

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_leglifrdr.jpg


    A laptop table for your chair
    If you work from home or plan to use your computer a lot during recovery, something like this could be helpful. Make sure it is sturdy. There are a LOT of flimsy tables out there and having one of those is worse than nothing at all!!

    The base needs to be weighted so that it is not top heavy and prone to tipping over when moved. This one is particularly good because it can pivot out of your way when you need to get up. This tray even has a big handle that you can grasp as you're sitting or standing.

    This is called the "Assist A Tray"

    Assist A Tray.JPG


    Chairs and sofas
    You never realize how low sofas and easy chairs are until you cannot bend your knee or hip normally. Before surgery, do a quick check, brace the leg so it will not bend and try to get up from the sofa. Not easy?!!


    Read this for detailed information
    Recliner chairs: things you need to know if buying one for your recovery.


    Have a comfortable seat cushion that elevates you to make it easier to get up and down from a chair. This one can make it easier to keep within the 90 degree rule sometimes required during THR recovery. The foam and gel would be especially comfortable!!

    awww.asseenontv.com_img_product_resized_954_00381024_394954_ca8c3af6ed54a9fd17d7c5dc4d71acef27.jpg

    Here are a couple of inexpensive fixes for when your furniture is too low:

    - Get some pallets and place them under the sofa or chair. This raises the sofa or chair about two inches. If that's not high enough, use two pallets. Be sure the furniture is securely sitting on the pallets. You may need to screw some boards along the edges to keep things in place.

    - Get some 2 x 4 boards and fasten two to the bottom of the couch or chair. This may be all the height change you need.
     
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  7. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Addons for walkers and crutches

    Walmart has a variety of baskets and bags available.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_walkerttt.jpg aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_walkeryty.jpg


    A tray that fits over the walker’s handles from Bed, Bath and Beyond:

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_shelffrlr.jpg

    Since I am a larger woman, none of the baskets etc would fit on my walker. I found this bag. It does not stick out so much that you cannot get thru doorways and it does not inhibit the movement of your legs. I attached the link to Walgreens Drug where I found this item.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_walkersws.jpg

    You need the tray on my walker! It works great. This is the one I have:

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_walkeryty.jpg


    For those (like myself) who use crutches, there is the crutch bag: I've this for over 2 years now and it has been a life saver! If the walker bag is made as well as the crutch bag, it is definitely worth the high price.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_crutchmcm.jpg


    This cane or walking stick that can stand up on its own is especially good when you need to use both hands....no risk of your cane slipping to the floor and you having to bend down to pick it up or trying to get it with your grabber (which would probably not be handy anyway!) It's called the All Terrain Hurry Cane.

    Hurry Cane.JPG Hurry Cane foot.JPG


    5. Something that brightens your day and makes you smile!!
    Add a whimsical touch to your walker or cane with bike handlebar streamers!

    aencrypted_tbn2_gstatic_com_images_a100b26b0b4b4fa33871365214ffc8f9._.jpg

    For the men and women with larger calves, antiembolism hose at the hospital only come in one size....TOOOOOO small. Truform makes stocking up to XXXL.
     
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  8. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Showering
    You could get in the shower almost right away if you cover your knee with some plastic so it doesn't get wet. I was showering from day 4.

    Shower glove
    Someone kindly sent me a leg wrap with a Velcro strap to put around the thigh. It's actually for a whole leg+foot, but I just cut off the foot as it was slippery in the bath when wet.


    ArmRx Leg Gloves

    shower legging.jpg


    Bath shelf, enables you to sit on the end and then slide across into the bath

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_bathboziz.jpg

    If you prefer, you could invest in an electric bath chair. They're not expensive and light enough to be lifted into and out of the bath for normal use. Complete Care Shop

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_bathchhnh.jpg







    Shower handles.I bought 2 handles for the shower at Walgreens. They have suction cups on each end and you just snap them on where you want them. Great for holding on to if you have nothing in the shower. It's one of those things "As seen on TV". I love it and they are very very strong! I'm way over weight and they hold me up with no problem.

    OTOH, I found them unreliable and wouldn’t trust them. They were okay for a day or two and then came off in my hand! There is a warning on the box. Also see peoples comments on Amazon. You’re really best getting the kind you fix with screws.

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_suctionsaf.jpg



    Long handled bath sponge or shower mop use these to reach distant places and not break your bending restrictions. I saw these in the Body Shop recently. Curved handle 15” long and dirt cheap!

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_bodyshwkw.jpg


    No Rinse Shampoo Caps – aide found it in the hospital for me. It made all the difference to get my hair washed when I was not allowed to shower. The kind I used needed a brief heat up in the microwave. It was awesome. I used another when I was home as I needed to wait more days before I was allowed to shower.

    waterless shampoo caps.JPG


    Easy-reach electric lady shaver.
    This rechargeable electric shaver offers a retractable extension handle that increases your reach by up to 14in, meaning no need for bending and straining when it comes to shaving your legs. Perfect for underarms when used without the extension, the rotating head ensures the shaver hugs the contours of your body closely for impressive results. Comes complete with charging adaptor, cleaning brush and carry pouch.

    Price £22.95 plus shipping House of Bath

    shaver long handled.JPG

    Unique Corner Shaving Foot Rest Fendhome

    foot support.jpg



    Head scarf - I knew that my hair would be a greasy mess after Day 1. I took a couple of fancy bandanna scarves with me - it made me feel so much better to know that I wasn't looking unkempt!
     
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  9. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Icing

    First check this thread Ice to control pain and swelling which shows many different types of icing machines.

    For those that can't afford a CryoCuff, I just used bags of peas to put under my knees and on my ankles. Put them in zip lock bags though because the bags tend to rip open and you will have peas everywhere.

    One that you need to collect BEFORE surgery is a bunch of small ice packs that is used for shipping things refrigerated or frozen. Check with your work they may get some. I put two small packs 4x4 in a gallon zip lock bag and it drapes perfectly over your knee.

    I have discovered that camping-type ice packs do not mold to the leg very well. I have purchased a few small ice packs and then place them a large gallon zip lock. It keeps them corralled and they fit around the knee better.

    I never could find Velcro straps in the drug store to hold them on, so I went to the bicycle shop and bought some of those straps meant for keeping your pants leg out of the chain. You can Velcro two together to make it long enough to go around.

    You can buy lengths of Velcro to suit yourself from a Haberdashery or online from many merchants.

    Of course the Cryocuff has been in action for icing sent home with me from the hospital but I have used smaller ice bags also (I have used frozen peas in the past for ic but they do tend to get very wet as they thaw.

    Rent or find someone who can loan you an ice machine. They work so much better than ice packs.

    Stock up on ice bags or some means to ice your leg. As my PT said, "Ice is your new best friend."

    Purchase a back support belt and two 9"x9" gel ice packs. The packs fit into the inside back support sleeves. The belt is wrapped around the knee and fastened with the existing Velcro attachments. This totally surrounds the knee, firmly, with ice. The total cost of the contraption was $30, and well worth the money. I used it following a scope, my first TKR and will use it again for the second TKR. The ease of use is exceptional and very efficient. I'm adding a photo of the finished project. Enjoy!

    ice pack belt.JPG
     
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    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
  10. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    You can’t beat a cycle for exercising a hip or a knee.

    From the very basic to high end machines:

    Standard Peddler, very affordable for at home.


    as_sears_com_is_image_Sears_00870733000_50e82dda7e53b66e7dc30bb45c8d3e04._.jpg


    I worked with this floor model pedal at first. After 3 days I was able to get my pedals to go all the way around. So after that I had to find a lower chair so that my knees would have to bend more but then I had troubles getting out of the lower chair. It works but not like I wanted it to.

    You can get cheap ones at Wal-Mart and more expensive ones at medical supply stores.


    Upright bike

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_uprightbik.jpg

    Recumbent bike

    aflagsforworship.co.uk_jo_pic_images_recumbklk.jpg
     
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  11. Jamie

    Jamie Administrator

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    Books. CDs amd DVDs on Surgery

    Helpful Books, CDs and DVDs


    1. Prepare For Surgery, Heal Faster by Patricia Huddleston
    Great book, CD is helpful but ordered separately - CD is a bit fast paced
    http://www.amazon.com/Prepare-Surge...5744/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323718209&sr=8-1


    2. Successful Surgery CD by Belleruth Naperstak
    The guided imagery and affirmations are great - wonderful voice and pacing
    http://www.amazon.com/Health-Journe...5346/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323718053&sr=8-1


    3. Sound Body/Sound Mind by Andrew Weil
    It is very, very very relaxing
    http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Body-Mi...PJ1C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323718103&sr=8-1

    4. Heal Your Hips: How To Prevent Hip Surgery, What To Do If You Need It by Robert Klapper and Lynda Huey
    Guide to prepare for surgery and exercises for recovery.
    http://www.amazon.com/Heal-Your-Hip...sr=8-1&keywords=pool+exercises+robert+klapper


    5. Heal Your Knees: How To Prevent Knee Surgery, What To Do If You Need It by Robert Klapper and Lynda Huey
    Guide to prepare for surgery and exercises for recovery.
    http://www.amazon.com/Heal-Your-Kne...sr=8-2&keywords=pool+exercises+robert+klapper


    6. The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook: Your Self-Treatment Guide for Pain Relief by Amber Davies and David G. Simmons
    This is a good book for self-massage therapy.
    http://www.amazon.com/Trigger-Point-Therapy-Workbook-Self-Treatment/dp/1572243759/


    7. Pro-Roller Massage Essentials by Angela Kneale
    Teaches you various stretching and massaging exercises for use with a foam roller.
    http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Roller-Massage-Essentials-Angela-Kneale/dp/0979988020/
     
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  12. thegiftlady

    thegiftlady Junior Member

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    Re: February Valentines 2012 - Are You Having Hip Surgery In February?

    Supplies you might want to have:

    I approached buying supplies for long term as best I could. Except when I thought I should pamper myself, bad idea. I never wear nightgowns but the H suggested them. I bought 2 with buttons for easy on. Never used. Ditto on the robe. I used what the hospital provided and did just fine. At home I wore stretch pants all the time with no problems.

    - A firm chair with arms. You have to get out of bed. I rented a high chair but did not use b/c the back of my thigh was still sore from a pre-op muscle pain I had. If you have no pain rent it. It's a great chair @ $55/mo. in NY

    - Lots of pillows: 1-2 firm pillows for a standard height chair to provide proper height + 1 for bed to put between legs + 2 for behind your back [improvise as needed here].

    - Stool softener. I was constipated from the meds for almost 3 weeks! Thought I'd explode! Constipation and stool softeners

    - Paper Towel in the bathroom. This is a just in case you spill or need. It can't hurt.

    - Long handled shoe horn [winter shoes are a challenge]

    - A lap tray . One that goes over your legs [gives you more room and look for pockets on the side]. I got a child's design / good size @ $6 at Christmas Tree store; pockets on the side good for pens, books/mags, etc. Mine had a "well" on the edge that caught little spills. Great!

    - Travel mug to tote any beverage up without spilling

    - Insulated lunch sack, tall with shoulder strap [I'm in the biz so I had 2 criss-crossed over my chest with all the loot I would need for the day = "tall" enough for your travel mug+ big enough for water, lunch, other goodies].

    - 2 minimum ½ gallon bottles of water. Best if one fits in your insulated bag for EZ toting. You must keep hydrated! Suggest you bring down the empty, the hubby brings up the full.

    - Crackers. It is wise to have something in your stomach when you take your drugs. Having them next to you makes this EZ.

    - Tablet or Laptop w/charger plugged for working in bed.

    - Clean out your top night stand drawer so you can use to store... meds, pencils/pens, pad, note book [have medical numbers handy a all times], remotes, tissues - everything you will need should be within arms reach. My drawer did not close for a month! No drawer? Get a good size storage container. 4-6" deep should work.

    - Cordless phone + charger - both should be arms reach-close

    Other thoughts:

    - I could not shower for almost 2 weeks [staples had to be out, a milestone, yea. I used pre-moistened cloths for my sponge baths, and facial cloths for my face. They were a great freshen' up for mid-day too. 2 packs of body cloths + 1 facial should do the trick.

    - I washed my hair in the sink not the shower to avoid being in the shower too long [low BP]. You may be a little unsteady the first weeks also so this may help you.

    - Use a safe shower mat. You will be amazed at how slippery the shower is when you are not sure-footed.

    - Rearrange your top clothes drawer to hold 5-7 days worth of underwear, tee shirts, pants, socks, etc. - everything you think you'll need daytime without assistance.

    - Move items in kitchen/other cabinets or shelves to waist height prior to surgery; you will not be able to reach them after surgery.

    - Prepare meals ahead of time and store in the freezer.

    - Delivery. Have your pizzeria delivery number handy and make your way down with ample time. I alerted FedEx and UPS of my condition; they buzzed the bell to let me know they were here and left the packages.

    Dog Walking: I knew my Max was way too needy to stay home with me. Tried it one day. He asked to go out every hour. NOT usual so I know he knew something was up. They know!

    Shoes On No ties, and definitely a pair that slide on with no help [check what you have]. I suggest a pair of fuzzy, backless slippers suitable for walking outdoor [rubber bottoms; I still use mine so a good investment]. I still use mine.
    Boots Don't even try without help.

    Car Take your time getting in/out. Have the seat all the way back and reclined as much as it will go [weeks 1-2 until you get the idea]. Get in butt first, all the way in. Then, one leg at a time. Lift your butt a bit if you feel you are breaking precautions. I kept a pillow in the car so I was not looking at the roof all the time. I had my R hip done so passenger entry was pretty easy with the good leg going in first. Not sure how it would work on a L hip. Practice before.

    I did not drive for 6 weeks, doctors orders. It killed me but I was compliant.
     
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  13. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Try the attachment here
     

    Attached Files:

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  14. Birminghamster

    Birminghamster New Member

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    make them a meal scheduler website

    People have asked me what has been the most important thing that has helped my recovery, and I can say without a doubt that it has been the website www.takethemameal.com.

    One of my friends set up a schedule for my family; a meal is brought to us by a friend on Tuesday, Thursday, and Sunday. Once the administrator has set up your site you can send an email to your friends inviting them to participate. This eliminates the hassle of grocery shopping and meal preparation which is a huge help!
     
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  15. skigirl

    skigirl Moderator

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    Dog walking
    When I was down with tkr---my husband also has a bad back and could not do the dog walking. I had a few friends from church who helped, but they eventually got tired of doing it. I finally called the local high school and the Guidance Counselor found a student who came by every day at 4. He drove for errands, walked the dog, picked up the droppings in the yard and shopped for ice cream if I needed it. I paid him a modest salary---I think $10 an hour. He needed the money for prom and i needed the help. Kismet!!

    Here are some places to get help for dog stuff: one: friends---I have a friend who does it for a living and I was happy to use her, but other friends were willing to stop by and take the dog for a 30 minute walk; church---lots of kids in our place and they are really helpful to us old fogies; senior center---a friend needed someone to stay with her for the first week and we found someone at the senior center who needed money and was happy to stay with her for a few days. Again, the fee was modest and affordable, much cheaper than a professional service.

    Also, call around to friends who have children---ask for the names of babysitters--people who need money. Finally, in our town, you can call the employment office and they will find someone to do jobs for you there. They do vet them before they send them out--again, someone who needs a job will always take a temporary way to earn some extra cash.
     
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  16. Happydale

    Happydale Senior

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    Country:
    United States United States
    Having spent the majority of last summer acquiring and adjusting to a new right knee, I'm dedicating Summer 2017 to the same goals for my left knee. I'm so glad to have BoneSmart help in the process! When I look in a mirror at my legs, the difference in shape is striking. My right leg is straight, and my right knee looks surprisingly like the shape of a real human knee, complete with a knee cap. My left side, on the other hand, is bowed out, and the knee is a huge round lump. If I could be assured that everything would go as smoothly as it did last summer, I'd be totally relaxed. But I'm a worrier at heart, so I have to wonder...will my pain be well controlled again??...will I avoid complications again? ....will I have amazing nurses again? and most of all ...will I be as satisfied with the outcome again? All I can say to these questions is "I sure hope so!!!"

    I'm sharing my current strategy here, both to make it intentional for myself, and perhaps to help others facing their first TKR:

    #1: Connect with folks on BoneSmart. Unlike our friends and family, who really don't want to hear much more than a paragraph about our impending dread and the details of knee surgery and recovery, folks on BoneSmart are living with the same concerns and worries and joys and triumphs. Before last summer, I would never have considered sleeping on my side, pooping, or lifting my leg into bed to be a triumph, but my BoneSmart friends allowed me to celebrate these accomplishments, no holds barred.
    #2: Get busy before surgery. This preparation work really helped make my recovery pleasant. It also is a good distraction from hand wringing! I want to clean my whole house since I won't be able to do much after surgery and also because I'll be home all summer staring at it. I am also making a list of all the meals I want to get socked away in the freezer. It was so nice to have delicious meals for myself and any family or friends who were helping me. I also made my own bone broth and froze it in canning jars. That's about all I wanted for a day or two after getting home from the hospital. I even have a list of all the supplies that need to be filled up - propane tank on the grill, hand soap dispensers, paper products, etc.
    #3: Pre-buy some thank you gifts. I want to have a supply of small gifts to give the friends, neighbors and family members who help me out during recovery. I got rides to P.T. and the doctor, neighbors who took out my trash, a niece who stayed at the hospital with me, and others who stayed with me after surgery, etc. I want to have gifts wrapped and ready to go.
    #4: Get all my recovery items together, including small water bottles to make into ice for my machine, leg elevation cushion, leg lifter, reacher-thingie tool (I can't tell you how helpful this item has been after recovery - things that fall down behind my dryer are easily retrieved now - LOVE it), raised toilet seat, walker... It's a lot of stuff!

    Hopefully this to-do list will keep me feeling in control and better able to cope with the torment and worry of waiting for surgery. I can't wait to get to know my fellow Sparklers!
     
  17. Hopetohike

    Hopetohike Junior Member

    Member Since:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Age:
    70
    Messages:
    53
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Oregon
    Country:
    United States United States
    After my last TKR I listened almost constantly to relaxing music on Pandora using ear buds with my phone. I recently found a website. ....asoftmurmur.com or as an app," a soft murmur" that allows you to choose birds, rain, waves, thunder, wind, fire, crickets, singing bowls, coffee shop in any combination or volume level. It's uploaded and ready to go on my phone for Monday!
     

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