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Reclining Chair

Discussion in 'Knee Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by Atlas_aus, Apr 17, 2019.

  1. Atlas_aus

    Atlas_aus member
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    Hey all,

    I am preparing for my bilateral TKR and was wondering if a chair like this would be suitable ?

    Everything I read says "elevation"..... Could I use this chair and a wedge for higher elevation ? I am trying to keep costs down but will not scrimp on things that will aid my recovery.

    chair.png
    Not sure something like this would give me enough elevation ?
     
  2. Bionic

    Bionic post-grad

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    Does the back on this chair recline further? My recliner goes more or less flat and then I add a cushion under my heel too.
    I believe there is a saying something like toes higher than nose
     
  3. Atlas_aus

    Atlas_aus member
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    Thanks for the quick reply.
    I am not sure, at best it would lay flat I suspect, I was thinking more for watching TV, meals etc. Not sure how one could 'sit' and be able to keep "toes higher than nose" :heehee:
     
  4. Bionic

    Bionic post-grad

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    You are right you can't really sit with toes higher than nose. I lie back and watch TV between my feet :loll:
     
  5. rosieNZ

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    You sure can!
    I have a powered recliner and an extra eide lounge doctor leg cushion. (Recommended on this site) Worked well and was so comfortable.
    But!!! Two issues.
    1: I had a manually operated recliner for my first TKR and didn't realise my legs would not be strong enough post op to operate it! Needed to go to the bathroom but couldn't get out of the chair as I was home alone. My family think its funny but ut wasn't to me! So I bought a powered recliner for my second TKR. I managed well at home alone.

    Secondly, the lounge doctor cushion that I have is the wide one. I couldn't position it myseelf without help. Also, I'm imagining a BTKR and wondering if you can lift both legs together onto it at once. My cushion takes up the majority of the recliner seat width when in place so it might be awkward for a BTKR and could be an issue with any cushion/wedge. I would be tempted to look into (and test drive) 2 leg lifters (cheap aids which you put around your foot and use your arm to lift the foot and leg up). I also felt (maybe its just me) that it was less painful to move both my legs together. You don't need to lie totally flat with lounge doctor (legs are up high even in a semi reclining position and its still effective) and you can use it in bed as well as in a recliner.
    Best wishes. Rosie
     
  6. tylermit

    tylermit junior member

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    To raise my recliner up I brought a pallet home from work and modified the size of it to fit under the chair. I cut a piece of plywood to cover the top and make a smooth surface for the recliner. It raised it 5 inches and is perfect for me. The only cost to me was 30 minutes.
     
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  7. Atlas_aus

    Atlas_aus member
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    Thanks Rosie.

    1. I am sorry, but have to agree with your family, it's funny :heehee:
    I am lucky I will have my Wife with me so if I go the manual way hopefully it won't be an issue. Having said that even now I have to get the Grandchildren to help with the footrest at their place and that is before surgery.

    2. You hit the nail on the head and is why I started a thread about BTKR issues... Things will be a lot different when I literally do not have a good leg to stand on, lean on etc. Thinking in "pairs" and not signally is where I am going to have problems I think. Did you get the leg lifters online ?

    No idea how I would go trying to get one onto the wedge, let alone both. Sounds like a lot of fun ahead ! Luckily the surgery is planned so I can do a few test runs on things before the big day.

    Thanks again for your help :flwrysmile:
     
  8. Jockette

    Jockette FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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  9. Atlas_aus

    Atlas_aus member
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  10. rosieNZ

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    Planning is the key and its great you still have time. I am sure people with bilateral TKR will respond to you. Having your wife home will be wonderful.

    Practical bed info *my experience).
    We raised our bed with blocks to the right height for me and slightly changed the position to give plenty of walk space. I used a big plant pot to put crutches in (they tend to slip and slide when you discard them). Husband insisted on sleeping with me (hes crazy) but put a pillow into the bed to be sure he didnt bump my knee. Worked well. There were a few times I couldnt sleep and needed his help to get up and go to my recliner.
    I just followed the info on this site (rest, ice, elevate) plus used an ice + compression machine which decreased swelling and helped pain and discomfort. Returned to work at 3 weeks because I had to. No issues but was sensible and continued to rest, ice etc after work. Had normal range of movements by 4 wks post op. From what Ive read its a little slower with 2 knees. After the initial week, I found I was tired but bored so think about things to occupy you. I got very sick of reno programmes on television!!
     
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  11. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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  12. Atlas_aus

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    This is gold ! Thinking outside the box :) My daughter is a handy carpenter so I think she already has a plan for the bed. Thanks for the info.

    Yes thanks, had found these. Hopefully it all comes together.
     
  13. possum65

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    @Atlas_aus It's great you're thinking of possible issues ahead with your upcoming btkr, but honestly, I think you will manage fine. I too worried how on earth I would be able to do anything with bilateral surgery, but the imagined problems just never happened. I used a wedge cushion on a recliner chair to get my legs above hip level. Used a leg lifter, purchased from a disability store, to move legs up onto wedge on the chair and in bed. Only needed to do this for the first week or two. The dreaded issue of not having a leg to stand on was simply a non event. You will be able to walk with either a walker or crutches, and I could negotiate the stairs, slowly and with care, one foot up or down, then bringing the other beside it. You will most likely find one leg a bit better than the other, use this as your "good" leg as for a single knee replacement. Seriously, try to relax and know that there is always a work around for any problem that arises. The worst part is waiting for surgery, once it's done you will be focused on moving forward.
     
  14. Atlas_aus

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    Hey Possum,

    Yes be prepared they used to say.... Funny I negotiate stairs like that now, one at a time... It's been a long time since I could walk up stairs like a normal person... Coming down I find even worse. Looking online for aids and will tee it up with my OT when I get one.

    Never been much of a 'waiter' and you are right I am sure all will be well. As good as all this information is on the WWW, I sometimes wonder whether we can see too much ! :loll:
     
  15. kneeper

    kneeper FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    In the very early days my "nest" was my bed, but as I ventured out to the living room and the recliner I did use at least one pillow to get my leg up a bit higher.
     
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  16. possum65

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    @Atlas_aus I think we can read too much and over think things! In saying that, I found this forum's approach to recovery spot on. The things I was told on discharge were "don't do too much and keep on top of the pain". (Great advice, but I really didn't know how much would be too much). Actually I did nothing for the first 2 weeks but rest with legs elevated, icing 4 times a day, go to the bathroom and only did the flexion and extension exercises as shown here. Took meds on time. Really worried I wasn't doing enough, but coming up to 7 weeks all is going very well. Of course I have gradually built on the exercises, walking and cycling - but with so much more caution than I normally would. Less is definitely best for knees.
     
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  17. Atlas_aus

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    Hello,

    I was reading some more last night, there seems to be 2 totally different views about recovery, go hard or go home or rest, ice and elevate.

    There has to be some middle ground and that is where I will be... I will let my body tell me what I need to do, but the obvious thing to do for the first few weeks must be rest, elevate and ice.

    My ultimate goal will be to be able to ride a skateboard again with my Siberian Husky pulling me :heehee:

    But seriously if I can do what I do now without the pain then I think I will be in front.
     
  18. Celle

    Celle FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    There are lots of different protocols for recovery - almost every surgeon recommends something slightly different. That depends on where they trained and what they also learned through experience.

    We've found, here on BoneSmart, that going too hard in the early days is not a good thing. Your knee needs some time and gentle treatment at first, so it can start to heal.

    Some surgeons and PTs believe the persistent myth, that you have to exercise early and achieve good ROM (Range of Motion) within a certain time frame. They were taught wrong. It isn't true.
    There's no need to rush to get ROM (Range of Motion) because it can continue to improve for a year, or even much longer, after a knee replacement. There isn't any deadline you have to meet:
    Myth busting: the "window of opportunity" in TKR

    My surgeon doesn't allow any PT at all for the first month after a knee replacement. He says your knee needs that time, to start on its journey of healing. For that month, we rest, ice and elevate our leg, and walk around the house.
    After that month, we just go to PT once every 2 weeks, where we are shown a few new exercises to do at home.
    His patients all do well and achieve good ROM, as I did, and he hasn't had to do a manipulation to help with ROM for the past 4 years. I think that speaks for itself.

    The most important thing is to realise that you are in charge of what happens to your knees. Listen to the messages your knee gives you, and do everything you can to keep it happy. Pain and increased swelling,at the time or later, are signs that you are doing too much, too soon for your knee.

    Do what you want to do BUT
    a. If it hurts, don't do it and don't allow anyone - especially a physical therapist - to do it to you
    b. If your leg swells more, hurts more, or gets stiffer in the 24 hours after doing it, don't do it again.​
    PT or exercise can be useful BUT take note of these
     
  19. Atlas_aus

    Atlas_aus member
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    Thanks @Celle

    Yes I agree. :)
     
  20. Woodpusher

    Woodpusher junior member

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    So what elevation will we need? Say I have the knee on a couple pillows on a recliner such that the thigh slopes down from it. Is that enough?

    Ken
     

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