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THR Out of town dilemma

NoHippo

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I am 48 years old, and planning on having hip replacement surgery this summer. I was very impressed with Dr. Kruezer in houston. I had a telehealth meeting with Mr. Lancaster the PA for Dr. K. I would be getting the corin mini hip with 36mm ceramic on ceramic head and cup. I live near Des Moines, Iowa and there is a convenient 2 hour direct flight from Des Moines to Houston. Unfortunately, my wife is unable to go with me because she will be caring for our daughter who has cerebral palsy. I don’t know how realistic it would be for me to have hip surgery, stay in a hotel, and then fly home on my own. I’m sure that I could find a good surgeon near home. I just think the hip used by Dr. K is a good one for active clients like myself. Does anyone know if Inov8 (where Dr. K works) would provide assistance for someone out of state like myself? They said I would need to stay in Houston for one week before flying home.
 

Pumpkln

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@NoHippo,
Welcome to BoneSmart glad you joined us!

Hip prosthesis all perform about the same, the most important decision you will make is the surgeon.
If you can stay nearer to home you will be happier, recommend you research surgeons in your area and find some one specializing in hips who does 100+ THR's a year, the more the better.
Surgeons use the prosthesis they are most familiar with and have the greatest success.

New BoneSmart members like you are in various stages of their journey to joint replacement. Making the decision whether or not to have surgery and preparing for surgery can be easier once you have done your research and know what lies ahead. Here are some tools that can help you decide what is best for you.

If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic hip?
Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced hip, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
Stories of amazing hip recoveries
 

Jaycey

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I would not recommend flying until at least 6 weeks post op. First, you will not be comfortable sitting any length of time. Then there is the risk of blood clots. Finally, you will tire very easily post op. So there is the practicality of even having the energy for the trip.

Here are a couple of surgeons from our data base who might be closer to home:
Dr. Devon Goetz
Dr.Mark Isaacson
DMOS Orthopedic Center
Des Moines, Iowa
515-224-5328
 

Eman85

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Just me but I want to meet the guy that's operating on me not just some reviews and a tele meeting with an assistant. Have you been examined by a local OS that determined you need a THR?
 

Celle

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@NoHippo
I have moved your thread from the Hip Surgery Recovery Area to the Hip Surgery Pre-Op Area, since you don't yet have a surgery date or a firm plan.

I think it would be better if you can find a surgeon closer to your home.

Don't get too hooked up on any one type of replacement hardware. The most important factor for success is the skill of your surgeon, not the type of hardware used.
There really isn't a lot of difference between the different types of replacement hardware, no matter what the advertising says.
 
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NoHippo

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Thanks for the advice. I will definitely choose a surgeon closer to home. After i had x rays and an mri, I met with a local surgeon last year who told me that I would no longer be able to lift weights with my legs with anything more than 100 pounds. I was pretty upset. I am assuming that he only installs hips for a more fragile clientele. I don’t want to retire from lifting. After talking to a few other surgeons, Some of the hip replacements would allow me to continue lifting heavier weights.
 

Jaycey

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Your surgeon will use the implant that is most appropriate given your lifestyle and medical situation. Discuss your concerns with your surgeon. Some will say you shouldn't lift again. Others will be fine with it. You may wear out any implant sooner if you continue to lift. But revisions happen everyday.

Find a surgeon that you can work with and get back to living again.
 

Going4fun

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My surgeon uses Corin but not the mini-hip. He places zero restrictions on my activity and is comfortable operating on highly active, athletic people. There is a pretty big consensus on devices these days---and you don't need the mini-hip to be active.

You want to find a surgeon with a good reputation, one that you trust, who is confident about their patients lifting weights after surgery (delayed of course). Be really specific about your goals after surgery when you meet with surgeons. And yes, you can find one of those nearby. Don't be afraid to consult multiple people until you have that "click" of having arrived at the right person.
 
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NoHippo

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Thank you. Great advice. I will definitely consult doctors until I find one who is on the same page with me.
 
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NoHippo

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I talked to my primary doctor and he gave me so names of local reputable orthopedic surgeons. He me told me the main concern with weightlifting on a hip replacement is avoiding dislocation. Would a dual mobility device be a good option?
 

Jaycey

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He me told me the main concern with weightlifting on a hip replacement is avoiding dislocation.
Yes, the low squats will be off limits for awhile. You will need to ease carefully into any training but only after you are released by your surgeon. I asked about returning to the gym at my 6 week followup and my surgeon gave the go ahead to use any equipment with no resistance until I was 3 months out.
Would a dual mobility device be a good option?
It might be. But the best person to answer this question is your surgeon. Have a very frank discussion with anyone you see regarding your lifestyle. Then let your surgeon chose the implant based on that discussion. Surgeons usually use the implant they have the most experience using. They are just as concerned about success rate as you are.
 

Going4fun

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Better to focus on finding a really good surgeon. Generally you want one who does 200+ hips a year. My surgeon does about 350 hips a year (and 350 knees).

It's not quite as simple as a particular device will allow you to lift weights better.

Really good surgeons know exactly what their patients can and can't do well. A really good surgeon using a particular device can have better results than a surgeon using a supposedly "better" device. The cutting and suturing and the way the surgeon inserts the device makes all the difference.

Surgeons have made huge progress in reducing dislocations in recent years, which is why so many are no longer placing restrictions on activity.

The bottom line is the really good surgeons operate in a way that produces really good results, and the really good surgeons pick good devices that produce good results for their technique.

No device inserts itself, and no device has outstandingly better results for particular conditions outside of the skill of the surgeon. Just get to an excellent surgeon who is confident about you reaching your post-surgery goals.

BTW: neither of the top two surgeons I narrowed my choices down to ... was concerned about weight lifting leading to dislocations.
 
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zauberflöte

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So lad you're not travelling! I had a hernia repair in June, and was told firmly to stay home for a month-- I sure didn't want to risk Covid post-op!

I don't ever lift 100 lbs, but do have a cautionary tale. About 6-7 months after my second hip, I participated in some heavy group lifting of first, a very heavy little marble statue, and the following weekend a commercial-weight treadmill. The treadmill was the proverbial straw, and my hip was not happy At All for quite some time after. Soft tissues; no damage to hip. I just wasn't rehabbed enough to do these things yet. Shoulda known better! Once you find your OS, have plenty of conversation about time frames. (Full disclosure, I was released at about 6 months "no restrictions" but I don't make a habit of carting statuary around!)
 

Eman85

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I don't think I'm classified as fragile clientele but am not a weight lifter for exercise. Post op my OS cautioned me about lifting any heavy weights. I can remember my hip not liking me carrying 2 heavy bags of groceries up the stairs. It took some time for the muscles to heal and get back to having the strength to lift. Main concern with THR is dislocation and not just over weight lifting. I'm not the best at following orders and always tested the limits. As my OS put it to me why would I want to screw up his good work of rebuilding me. I can lift but I don't try and carry much weight.
 

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