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Nutritional Snippets - Did you know..

Discussion in 'Nutritional Snippets' started by Poppet, Jul 18, 2014.

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  1. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Impulsivity linked to binge eating

    Do you get impulsive when you're upset?

    If so, this could be putting you at risk for binge eating.

    The more impulsive you are, the more likely it is you'll binge eat when experiencing negative feelings.
     
  2. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    How often are your cells replaced?

    Your body is constantly replacing old cells with new ones at the rate of millions per second. By the time you finish reading this sentence, approximately 50 million of your cells will have died and been replaced by others. Some are lost through 'wear and tear', some just reach the end of their life, and others deliberately self-destruct.
     
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  3. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Missing link found between brain, immune system; major disease implications

    In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. That such vessels could have escaped detection when the lymphatic system has been so thoroughly mapped throughout the body is surprising on its own, but the true significance of the discovery lies in the effects it could have on the study and treatment of neurological diseases ranging from autism to Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis.

    aimages.sciencedaily.com_2015_06_150601122445_1_540x360.jpg
    Maps of the lymphatic system: old (left) and updated to reflect UVA's discovery.
    Credit: University of Virginia Health System
     
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  4. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Programming DNA to reverse antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    At its annual assembly in Geneva last week, the World Health Organization approved a radical and far-reaching plan to slow the rapid, extensive spread of antibiotic resistance around the world. The plan hopes to curb the rise caused by an unchecked use of antibiotics and lack of new antibiotics on the market.

    New research introduces a promising new tool to combat the rapid, extensive spread of antibiotic resistance around the world. It nukes antibiotic resistance in selected bacteria, and renders other bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics. The research, if ultimately applied to pathogens on hospital surfaces or medical personnel's hands could turn the tide on untreatable, often lethal bacterial infections.


     
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  5. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Could a mushroom a day help keep the doctor away?

    Some early evidence indicates that the Shiitake mushroom boosts immunity. Of the thousands of mushroom species globally, about 20 are used for culinary purposes. Shiitake mushrooms are native to Asia and are cultivated for their culinary and medicinal value.
     
  6. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Eating prunes as part of a weight control diet can improve weight loss, research shows.

    Consumption of dried fruit is not readily recommended during weight loss despite evidence it enhances feelings of fullness. However, a study of 100 overweight and obese low fiber consumers tested whether eating prunes as part of a weight loss diet helped or hindered weight control over a 12-week period. The results were promising.
     
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  7. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Can food be medicine? -- sometimes, yes -- more about prunes!

    It's becoming clear in recent years that what you eat can be highly effective in preventing or reversing some health problems, especially for example chronic constipation. Constipation is a symptom, not a disease. If you want safe and effective long-term relief for chronic constipation, you don't need to look any further than your grocer's shelves..... Prunes!

    Prunes have a natural laxative. Prunes contain fibre, a type of alcohol sugar called sorbitol that can loosen the stool and a natural laxative compound called diphenyl isatin.

    Plums and prunes not only protect the brain from free radical damage but can also help to prevent chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Prunes and plums contain high levels of phytonutrients called phenols. They’re particularly high in two unique phytonutrients called neochlorogenic and chlorogenic acid. Numerous studies show that these phytonutrients help to prevent damage to cells particularly when it comes to the oxidation of fat molecules in the body. Since all of our cell membranes, as well as our brain cells, are largely made up of fat, these are important phytonutrients to have in the diet. These compounds have also been found to inhibit the oxidation of LDL cholesterol in the body making them an important factor in the prevention of chronic diseases.

    Prunes and plums are high in soluble fibre that helps to keep blood sugar levels stable. Soluble fibre slows the rate that food leaves the stomach and, as a result, delays the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. Soluble fibre also increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin. The soluble fibre in prunes helps you feel satisfied after a meal, which can prevent overeating and subsequent weight gain.

    The soluble fibre may also help to lower cholesterol by soaking up excess bile in the intestine and then excreting it. Bile is made from cholesterol in the liver in order to digest fat. When the body excretes bile along with the fibre from prunes and plums, the liver must use cholesterol in the body to make more bile thereby lowering the amount in circulation in the body. Soluble fibre may also inhibit the amount of cholesterol manufactured by the liver in the first place.

    Recent studies show that prunes and plums are one of the most effective fruit in preventing and possibly reversing bone loss due to rich sources of phenoic and flavonoid compounds. In the first five to seven postmenopausal years, women are at risk of losing bone at a rate of 3 to 5 percent per year. However, osteoporosis is not exclusive to women and, indeed, around the age of 65, men start losing bone with the same rapidity as women. It is thought that the trace amounts of boron and potassium contained in the dried fruit helped to promote bone health.

    Prunes contain the same phenols that plums have, protecting the fats in our system from damage. They also have significant amounts of beta-carotene. A 2013 study showed that an increased intake in beta carotene can actually make people happier. Beta-carotene also protects and fixes the damage of free radicals on our cells meaning it can help reverse the signs of aging. Prunes also contain Vitamin K. Vitamin K works in conjunction with beta carotene to fight the signs of aging by helping reduce bone loss and improving circulation.

    In contrast, prunes' reputation for being rich in iron doesn't hold true. In reality, they're a decent, but not spectacular, source. Prunes, however, get overlooked as a source of vitamin A, even though they may provide more than ten percent of recommended levels. Potassium is another unexpected benefit you get from eating prunes, which is beneficial for blood pressure and regulating your heartbeat.

    Do remember though, that prunes are high in soluble fibre and alcohol sugar called sorbitol, so start slowly, especially if you have any digestive issues. In addition, eating large quantities of prunes whilst on blood thinning medication the Vitamin K content should be considered.
     
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  8. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Hemorrhoids

    While hemorrhoids are not usually a topic for casual conversation, maybe they should be. Between 50 and 75 percent of us may suffer from them at some point. Ranging from annoying to downright painful, most hemorrhoids can be prevented or alleviated through a combination of lifestyle, and diet.

    What are hemorrhoids?

    Like varicose veins, hemorrhoids (or piles) are swollen blood vessels. To help control bowel movements, our bodies fill anal tissue with blood. Pressure on the veins in this tissue causes swelling and stretching that, over time, can form hemorrhoids in the outer rectum (internal hemorrhoids), the anus (external hemorrhoids), or both. Although hemorrhoids can be painful, they are seldom serious.

    What are the common symptoms?

    • bleeding during bowel movements, either as streaks of bright red or mucus on toilet paper or the surface of the stool—occasional bleeding from hemorrhoids is common, but generally self-limited; however, blood-thinning medication can aggravate it
    • itching
    • rectal pain, particularly if an internal hemorrhoid prolapses or protrudes outside the rectum into the anus, where it can be squeezed by the anal (sphincter) muscles
    • hard, sensitive lump(s) near the anus
    In addition; the liver is most active between 1-3am when it is processing wastes, cleansing, eliminating lymphatic junk and regenerating. If the liver is burdened due to a sluggish system, recent ill health, allergies, pharmaceutical medication side effects or poor diet then it may heat up due to being over worked. Liver heat may be underlying reason for hemorrhoids and a dry bowel (constipation), for some folk.

    Often people will wake during this time of 1-3am feeling thirsty and hot because the liver is working over time and many will often feel unrefreshed in the morning.

    What causes hemorrhoids?

    Although we can get hemorrhoids at any age, they tend to come with increasing age because the rectum walls weaken, making it easier for blood vessels to protrude.

    However, there are other causes. Pain meds. Pressure. Straining, rushing, or holding your breath during bowel movements puts extra pressure on the rectum, as does persistent diarrhea, constipation, and overusing laxatives and enemas. Delaying the need to go can worsen constipation and make stool harder and more difficult to pass.
    Carrying excess weight as well as lifting loads that are too heavy or using an incorrect lifting technique can cause haemorrhoids. ‘Roids of both kinds are not unknown to body builders.' Being pregnant has a triple effect. Hormonal changes increase blood flow to the pelvis while relaxing supportive tissues, the weight of the fetus exerts pressure on those blood vessels, and labour further intensifies pressure on the anal area. Having long-term heart and liver disease may cause blood to pool in the abdomen and pelvic area, enlarging rectal veins.
    Certain pain medications as well as some anticonvulsants, antacids, antidepressants, antihistamines, analgesics, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can also cause constipation, increasing the chances of developing hemorrhoids. Having parents who had hemorrhoids also makes it more likely to develop them.

    How can we treat hemorrhoids naturally?

    While hemorrhoids are generally not considered a serious condition, they can be quite painful. By tweaking lifestyle choices, we can help prevent or lessen their effects.

    Changing some old bathroom habits or adding new ones can go a long way toward avoiding or alleviating some of the worst symptoms of hemorrhoids. Go when the urge strikes. Delaying bowel movements can cause or aggravate existing constipation and worsen hemorrhoid symptoms. Take enough time, but not too much. Rushing or sitting too long on the toilet increases rectal vein pressure. Establish a regular time for a bowel movement to train your body to be more regular. After meals or in the morning or evening are often good times. Drinking a hot beverage about 30 minutes before may help stimulate the colon. Place feet on a step stool when having a bowel movement to mimic crouching. This repositions the rectum, making it easier and less painful to pass stool. Use hypoallergenic baby wipes instead of dry toilet paper to ease skin irritation. Take a warm shower or bath to cleanse anal area, but avoid soaps with perfumes or dyes. Use a sitz bath filled with warm water for 10 to 15 minutes several times daily. Alternatively, apply ice packs to shrink inflamed tissue.

    Diet and exercise

    Food sensitivities, such as to dairy and gluten, are extremely common. Removing them can lead to dramatic improvements in not only hemorrhoids but also other gut issues such as constipation, diarrhea, and bloating.

    Many simple changes that help with hemorrhoids are also good for general health. Eat high-fibre foods—fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, and nuts—to soften stool and increase stool bulk, making it easier to pass.

    Fibre supplements including psyllium husks, chia seeds and linseeds will help to bulk and soften the stool. Take a heaped dessertspoon each day in water, in your breakfast cereal or in a smoothie. Take with a large glass of water.

    Some foods such as prunes and berries are natural laxatives. Don’t peel fruits that have edible skins, as that removes much of their fibre.

    Bioflavonoids, in particular diosmin and hesperidin found in citrus plants, may reduce bleeding and improve overall hemorrhoid symptoms, according to a 2012 review of clinical trials. Food sources of bioflavinoids include capsicums, strawberries, citrus fruits, broccoli and spinach, dark leafy greens, strawberries, kiwifruit) and Vit E (Avocados, nuts and seeds) are all recommended.

    Other dietary treatments for hemorrhoids include vitamin C rich foods, which help to maintain the integrity of your veins, and eating more flavonoids and anthocyanins to strengthen your veins. Sources of flavonoids include lemons, limes, apples, tomatoes, onions and carrots; sources of anthocyanins include dark, red berries, blueberries, cherries, grapes and red cabbage. Another natural food remedy for hemorrhoids is eating a banana on an empty stomach every day. For bleeding hemorrhoids, try eating three bananas daily, or try steamed dried persimmons.

    Also reduce your alcohol and caffeine intake as these can have a constricting action on capillaries.

    Avoid low-fibre foods, including fast food as well as white pasta, pastries, cheese, and white rice, which can cause constipation.

    Magnesium nutrient foods works to retain water in the stool to keep it soft and help bowels relax so stool can pass more easily, (check out my separate article on Magnesium).

    Probiotics help produce fuel for the gut mucosa and keep the gut healthy.

    Drink eight glasses of water or nonalcoholic fluids daily to keep stool soft.

    Avoid caffeine and nicotine, which overstimulate the gut, making it lose its own natural rhythm.

    Avoid prolonged periods of standing or sitting.

    Exercise daily to speed up the digestive process and to limit the amount of water the body absorbs from the stool while in the intestines, keeping it bulkier and softer. In addition, aerobic exercise stimulates the natural contraction of intestinal muscles that help push stool out quickly and efficiently.

    Note: anal bleeding can also indicate serious conditions such as colitis, Crohn’s disease, or colorectal cancer. See a health care practitioner to rule them out.
     
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  9. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Exercise 101 -- don't forget to warm up and cool down

    Warm up

    When you start to get back into your normal activities and exercising more don't forget that your warm up and cool down are as important as the exercise itself.

    A good warm-up should last five to 10 minutes and work all major muscle groups. For best results, start slowly, then pick up the pace. A simple warm-up is to walk in place while gently swinging your arms, or even dancing to a few songs.

    Warming up pumps nutrient-rich, oxygenated blood by breaking down the chemical complex of oxygen, which enables it to separate from the blood and enhance its delivery to your muscles as it speeds up your heart rate and breathing.

    Muscle Temperature Increases: Muscles that are properly warmed up before rigorous activity will be able to contract with more force, and relax at a faster rate after a contraction. With warmer muscles, your body's strength and speed will be increased. In addition, warming up before stretching can assist in helping to prevent overextending a muscle and thus causing an injury.

    Body Temperature Increases: Properly warming up will cause your body temperature to rise, making your muscles more elastic, therefore reducing the potential for muscle and connective issues. Not only will your muscles be better able to perform, but a warmer body temperature can lower the probability of encountering a muscle pull or strain.

    Dilated Blood Vessels: Taking the time to warm up forces the blood vessels to dilate. This will reduce the tension that physical activity places on your heart, and increase blood flow throughout your body.

    Your Body is Able to Cool Down Faster: Warming up also triggers processes in the body (i.e. sweating, increased breathing rate) that assist in cooling down muscles and joints when they begin to get too hot. By performing a proper warm-up, you can reduce the effect that heat has on your muscles and joints when initially beginning your routine.

    Blood Temperature Increases: Similar to your muscles and body, blood operates more efficiently when it is warmed up. As blood temperature rises, blood oxygen levels rise. With a more oxygenated blood stream, muscles receive larger volumes of nutrients and can function at a much greater level.

    Range of Motion Increases: By properly warming up, your joints will be more capable of extending safely throughout their full range of motion.

    Increases the Secretion of Hormones: When performing a warm-up routine, additional hormones are automatically secreted to provide your body with energy via additional carbohydrates and fatty acids. These additional hormones are crucial for a successful and productive workout.

    Increases Mental Focus: When performing a warm-up routine, the mind will enter a state of focus and preparation required for the exercises that you are about to perform. This increase in focus allows the mind to remain positive, relaxed, and with an increased level of concentration.

    Cool-down

    After your workout, it's best to spend five to 10 minutes cooling down through a sequence of slow movements. This helps prevent muscle cramps and dizziness while gradually slowing your breathing and heart rate.

    An effective cool-down also incorporates stretching exercises to relax and lengthen muscles throughout your body and improve your range of motion.

    To get the most out of these exercises, hold each stretch for 10 to 30 seconds. The longer you can hold a stretch, the better for improving your flexibility. As with the warm-up, it's best to flow from one stretch to the next without rests in between.

    Note: If you experience pain, do not continue and seek advice from your doctor.
     
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  10. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    New Zealand blackcurrants good for the brain

    Research has shown that New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile, a finding that could have potential in managing the mental decline associated with aging populations, or helping people with brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease or depression.

    The research, conducted by scientists at Plant & Food Research (New Zealand) in collaboration with Northumbria University (UK), showed that compounds found in New Zealand blackcurrants increased mental performance indicators, such as accuracy, attention and mood. The study also showed that juice from a specific New Zealand blackcurrant cultivar, 'Blackadder', also reduced the activity of a family of enzymes called monoamine oxidases, which regulate serotonin and dopamine concentrations in the brain. These chemicals are known to affect mood and cognition, and are the focus for treatments of both neurodegenerative symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease and mood disorders, including stress and anxiety.
     
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  11. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Dietary trans fat linked to worse memory!

    Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFA), commonly used in processed foods to improve taste, texture and durability, has been linked to worsened memory function in men 45 years old and younger, according to a study sourced from the University of California, San DiegoHealth Sciences. The researcher quoted "... while trans fats increase the shelf life of foods, they reduce the shelf life of people"
     
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  12. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Fat, sugar cause bacterial changes that may relate to loss of cognitive function

    A study indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of 'cognitive flexibility,' or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations. This effect was most serious on the high-sugar diet, which also showed an impairment of early learning for both long-term and short-term memory.

    The findings are consistent with some other studies about the impact of fat and sugar on cognitive function and behavior, and suggest that some of these problems may be linked to alteration of the microbiome -- a complex mixture in the digestive system of about 100 trillion microorganisms.

    It's increasingly clear that our gut bacteria, or microbiota, can communicate with the human brain.

    This work suggests that fat and sugar are altering your healthy bacterial systems, and that's one of the reasons those foods aren't good for you. It's not just the food that could be influencing your brain, but an interaction between the food and microbial changes! These types of changes to the gut bacteria may have an impact on the immune system.
     
  13. Poppet

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    High protein foods boost cardiovascular health, as much as quitting smoking or getting exercise

    Increasing intake from protein-rich foods such as meat, fish, dairy produce, beans, lentils, broccoli and spinach could be an important and a readily achievable way to reduce people's risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

    "Results from previous studies have provided evidence that increased dietary protein may be associated with lower blood pressure. We wanted to know whether protein from animal sources or plant-based sources was more beneficial -- so we drilled down and looked at the different amino acids found in both meat and vegetables.

    We studied seven amino acids -- arginine, cysteine, glutamic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, and tyrosine. Glutamic acid, leucine, and tyrosine are found in animal sources, and a higher intake was associated with lower levels of arterial stiffness. All seven amino acids, and particularly those from plant-based sources, were associated with lower blood pressure.

    The really surprising thing that we found is that amino acid intake has as much of an effect on blood pressure as established lifestyle risk factors such as salt intake, physical activity and alcohol consumption. For arterial stiffness, the association was similar to the magnitude of change previously associated with not smoking".

    It was further reported that:

    "The finding that eating certain meat and plant proteins are linked to healthier blood pressure is an exciting finding. We need to understand the mechanism to see if it is direct or via our gut microbes."
     
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  14. Poppet

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    High iron intake may increase appetite

    Using an animal model, researchers have found that dietary iron intake, equivalent to heavy red meat consumption, suppresses leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite.

    Iron is the one mineral that humans can't excrete, so the more iron that is consumed the greater the likelihood that leptin levels will drop, resulting in increased appetite and the potential to overeat.
     
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    Using garlic to combat antimicrobial resistant urinary tract infections

    Garlic extract may be an effective weapon against multi-drug resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria associated with urinary tract infections (UTI), according to a recent study.

    Urinary tract infection is the second most common infectious disease encountered in community practice. Worldwide, about 150 million people are diagnosed each year with UTI, at a total treatment cost in the billions of dollars. Although UTI is usually treated with antibiotics, "emerging antimicrobial resistance compels us to look back into traditional medicines or herbal products, which may provide appropriate/acceptable alternative solutions," the authors argue.

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has been traditionally used for the treatment of diseases since ancient times. A wide range of microorganisms -- including bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses -- are known to be sensitive to garlic preparations. Allicin and other sulphur compounds are thought to be the major antimicrobial factors in garlic.

    In this study, the team found that 56% of 166 bacteria strains isolated from the urine of people with UTI showed a high degree of resistance to antibiotics. However, about 82% of the antibiotic resistant bacteria were susceptible to a crude aqueous extract of Allium sativum. According to the researchers, "ours is the first study to report the antibacterial activity of aqueous garlic extract against multidrug resistant bacterial isolates from infected urine samples leading to UTI."

    "To conclude, there is evidence that garlic has potential in the treatment of UTI and maybe other microbial infections," says the team. "However, it is necessary to determine the bioavailability, side effects and pharmacokinetic properties in more detail."
     
  16. Poppet

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    What do we need more of as we get older?

    Protein: Older adults need 25% more protein than younger adults. A higher protein intake can help to improve and maintain muscle mass and strength, and improve blood pressure and bone health. It may also improve the body’s ability to fight infection and heal wounds. Suggested sources of protein: eggs, lean meats, fish, low fat dairy foods, nuts and seeds and legumes

    Riboflavin (otherwise known as vitamin B2) is involved in metabolism and is important in making the nutrients in what we eat available to the body. Older people need 20% more vitamin B2 than younger adults. Vitamin B2 deficiency is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and anaemia. Suggested sources include milk, cheese, leafy vegetables, liver, kidneys, legumes, tomatoes, yeast, mushrooms, and almonds are good sources of vitamin B2.

    Vitamin B6 is involved in a number of processes in the body. The elderly are at increased risk of B6 deficiency, signs of which can include seborrhoeic dermatitis (skin disorder affecting the sebaceous glands), ‘smooth tongue’, lesions at the corners of the mouth, conjunctivitis, and neurologic symptoms of drowsiness, confusion, and neuropathy. Vitamin B6 is found in a wide range of foods. Suggested sources include meats, whole grain products, vegetables, nuts and bananas.

    Vitamin B12: After age 50, your body's ability to absorb the vitamin often fades because you don't have as much stomach acid, which is needed to break B12 down from food sources. Digestive secretions diminish markedly, although enzymes remain adequate. B12 is important for creating red blood cells and DNA, and for maintaining healthy nerve function. Suggested sources include fish, meat, poultry, eggs, milk, and milk products.

    Zinc can be related to specific diseases in the elderly. It can also be a factor with vitamin K in wound healing. Zinc improves taste acuity in people where stores are low. If you eat meats, eggs and seafood your zinc intake should be adequate.

    Vitamin D: As we age, our skin’s capacity to produce vitamin D declines. As people age, bone density is lost. To protect yourself against osteoporosis. We need to be conscious of getting enough sun. In the warmer months, aim for 10-15 minutes of unprotected sun exposure on the face, arms and hands before 10am or after 3pm, three to four times a week. In winter, try to get out in the sun for 1-2 hours each week.

    Calcium: The absorption of calcium from what we eat or drink declines as we age, so we need to be conscious of including calcium rich food and drinks regularly. Suggested sources of calcium are reduced fat dairy foods: milk (or calcium fortified soy milk), cheese, yoghurt and custard (these are also good sources of protein).

    Adequate fibre: Fibre requirements don’t increase with age, but there is a higher risk of constipation as we age due to decreased gut motility and inactivity. Include fruit, vegetables and legumes, nuts and seeds and grains.

    Fluid: When we get older, our kidneys don’t work as well and our sensation of thirst declines (meaning we don’t recognise that we are thirsty). These factors result in an increased risk of dehydration, which can result in drowsiness and confusion. It is suggested that 1500-2000ml (50-65 ounces) of fluid is consumed in regular small amounts over the day.

    Here are a few additional tips...

    Choose a variety of colors in fruits and vegetables, alternating choices throughout meals. Vary protein sources; choose meats, fish, whole nuts, nut butters, and beans. Increase the variety of texture in meals. Alternate between whole grain breads,cereals, pastas, and rice. Get liquids from various sources, including water, milk, juice, tea, or soup. Vary preparation methods for different foods. Roast, steam, or sauté vegetables. Bake, grill, or stew meats. Do not skip meals. Make meal times and eating an enjoyable and social activity that you can look forward to. Try to share meal times with family and friends. Keep your cupboard well stocked with non-perishable items in case you can’t make it to the supermarket. Cook up bigger batches of your favourite casserole or soup and freeze in portions.

    Remain active to support mental and physical health. Keeping fit preserves muscle strength and helps maintain independence.
     
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    Sugar and functionality of the immune system

    Studies have shown that consuming 100 grams of sugar can cause up to a 50% reduction in the ability of white blood cells to destroy foreign particles for over 5 hours!

    Suggestion: check the quantity of sugar (carbohydrates) in processed foods, e.g pasta, breads, biscuits, cakes and dried fruit snacks and other hidden sources of sugar content
     
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  18. Poppet

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    Fruit and vegetables aren't only good for a healthy body; they protect your mind too..

    Eating a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary pattern, comprising of fruit, vegetables, legumes, and nuts and low in processed meats, is associated with preventing the onset of depression, according to research. A large study of 15,093 people suggests depression could be linked with nutrient deficits.
     
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    Researchers identify gene that determines bone density, fracture risk

    Decoding genetics of osteoporosis may prevent fractures in older adults

    A genetic variant regulating a gene responsible for bone mineral density and fracture risk has been identified by researchers. Findings from this study could lead to interventions that may prevent fractures in older adults, they say.
     
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  20. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
    Thread Starter

    Member Since:
    Sep 5, 2011
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    If you are sitting down, don't sit still...

    New research suggests that the movements involved in fidgeting may counteract the adverse health impacts of sitting for long periods.
     
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