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Nutritional Snippets - Did you know..

Discussion in 'Nutritional Snippets' started by Poppet, Jul 18, 2014.

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  1. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Nutritional snippets

    In this thread I intend to post snippets of information, which you may find interesting and beneficial.

    This is part of my ongoing nutritional research for Bonesmart to encourage a balanced nutrient rich natural diet, lifestyle and introduce new natural medicine research.....
     
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  2. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Walk at work

    Walk@Work is an automated intervention which focuses on reducing occupational sitting through progressive increases in workday walking. The 12 week program targets office workers and is delivered by an innovative website that provides employees with educational and motivational materials, practical information on strategies and interactive features such as discussion forums and feedback on step count goals.

    'Walk@Work' won the Premier's Healthy Queensland Award for Australian workplaces in 2009 and, as part of the International Universities Walking Project, has since been implemented and evaluated in worksites across Australia, Canada, Spain, the UK and the US.
     
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  3. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Sultana sensation

    When was the last time you ate a very small handful of sultanas? Well it might be time to consider including them occasionally in your diet.

    Studies show that sultanas may help reduce the risk with heart disease and diabetes, as well as helping control blood sugar and aiding weight loss.

    All in moderation of course, dried fruit is high in concentrated sugar.

    Note from Jamie: Sultanas are what we in the USA call Thompson Seedless Grapes or golden raisins.
     
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  4. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Gene discovery reveals importance of eating your greens

    Research suggests that eating green leafy vegetables may boost a newly discovered genetic pathway that is essential for intestinal health.

    Studies are indicating that a gene known a T-bet is responsible for the production of a type of cell that helps repair the lining of the gut and maintain the balance of good and bad gut bacteria!

    The immune cells, named innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), are found in the lining of the digestive system and protect the body from ‘bad’ bacteria in the intestine.
     
  5. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Ticked off Carnivores - tick bites likely to cause allergy to red meat!

    Ticks are icky. They spread Lyme disease. And now it appears they might interfere with your ability to enjoy a hamburger. A team headed by Dr. Thomas Platts-Mills, U.Va. professor and former president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, recently published findings that suggest that tick bites may cause allergic reactions to red meat. Dr. Platts-Mills says that tick saliva may trigger the human immune system to produce antibodies to a carbohydrate called alpha-gal, which is found in red meat.

    Dr. Scott Commins, an assistant professor of medicine at U.Va. and lead author of the study, explains that an allergic reaction occurs when the body produces antibodies—meant to defend against harmful bacteria or toxins—against an otherwise benign substance, the allergen. When antibodies bind to the allergen, certain cells release histamine, which in turn causes symptoms such as swelling, hives and breathing problems.

    The researchers screened hundreds of human blood samples from locations in the U.S., Africa and Central America for the antibodies against alpha-gal. Their findings? Meat allergies are more common in places where tick populations are on the rise. The team also studied people with the allergy in the laboratory setting. “We’re sure ticks can do this,” Dr. Platts-Mills told the Washington Post. “We’re not sure they’re the only cause.”

    Unique to this particular allergy is that the reactions are delayed. Symptoms don’t appear until several hours after exposure, which can make them difficult to diagnose. “We have now performed this under observation, and there are no symptoms until after 3 to 4 hours,” said Dr. Commins. Dr. Platts-Mills and his colleagues’ next topics of study: Why are the allergic reactions so delayed? And why do only some people develop the problem?
     
  6. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Viruses use 'fake' proteins to hide in our cells!

    Some viruses can hide in our bodies for decades and make ‘fake’ human proteins that trick our immune cells into believing nothing is wrong.

    Now researchers at the Imaging Centre of Excellence at Monash and Melbourne Universities have determined the basic structure of one of the two known families of these deceptive proteins.

    Immune T-cells patrol our bodies checking on the health of cells. One of the things they look for is a complex of proteins on the surface of cells. This major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a snapshot of what’s inside the cell. If bits of viral protein are detected by the T cells, they flag the infected cell for destruction.

    Viruses fight back by disrupting the production of the MHC protein complex, thus reducing the numbers on the outer membrane. But then, the next stage of what could be described as an evolutionary arms race kicks in. If there are too few MHC proteins on the outer membrane of a cell, then a different type of immune cell, termed the natural killer cell, will kill the cell just to be safe.

    The research, published online by the Journal of Biological Chemistry, is an important first step towards producing better vaccines and drugs to fight viral disease.
     
  7. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Foods containing Zinc may starve bacteria

    It has been reported that depriving bacteria of the essential mineral manganese is the mechanism by which zinc may prevent infectious disease.

    The finding, by infectious disease researchers at the University of Adelaide and The University of Queensland (UQ), opens the way for further work to design antibacterial agents in the fight against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Manganese is an essential metal that Streptococcus pneumoniae needs to invade and harm humans.

    “We can now see, at an atomic level of detail, how this transport protein is responsible for keeping the bacteria alive by scavenging one essential metal (manganese), but at the same time also makes the bacteria vulnerable to being killed by another metal (zinc)," Professor Kobe said.

    Professor Matt Cooper from UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) said antibiotic-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged more than 30 years ago, with up to 30 per cent of these bacterial infections now considered multi-drug resistant.

    “The Centers for Disease Control classify multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae as a serious threat, with more than one million cases per year in the US alone,” Professor Cooper said.
     
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  8. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    That old Chestnut

    The carbs that come from chestnuts are complex. Unlike simple carbs, complex carbs are digested slowly, which gives you even energy levels. Simple carbs tend to give you a fast spike of energy followed by a fast dip.

    Chestnuts are high in fibre. Gluten free. Contain no fat and no cholesterol. They have a generous blend of B vitamins including, B6, folate, thiamine and riboflavine, an excellent source of vitamin C and important trace minerals such as manganese and copper.

    Manganese is a known antioxidant, which soaks up free radicals in the system. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, manganese also plays a key role in the aging process. Manganese also helps with connective-tissue production and blood clotting. Add chopped chestnuts to a bowl of oatmeal for a manganese-packed breakfast.

    Copper enhances bone strength, helps with red blood cell formation and nerve function and boosts the immune system.

    Note: A trace mineral is only needed in a small amount by the body.

    Chestnuts have a high fiber content. Dietary fiber comes in the form of soluble and insoluble. Soluble gets absorbed in water and forms a gel-like consistency in the intestines. This type helps reduce cholesterol and stabilizes blood-sugar levels. Insoluble fiber creates bulk in the stool and helps it pass through the system quickly. This helps reduce the risk for constipation!

    The simplest way to eat chestnuts is as a delicious, nutritious snack.

    Just make a small incision on the flat side to prevent them from bursting, roast in the oven or on the barbecue and peel while warm. Peeled chestnuts can be stored in an airtight container overnight for use the next day. To have chestnuts all year round they can be frozen. Just leave the shells intact and pack them into a sturdy plastic bag or container. Frozen nuts once thawed are not suitable for roasting but are perfect in soups, purees and seasonings.
     
  9. Poppet

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    Coffee conundrum

    Research from the Western Australian University indicates your daily coffee might have health benefits including reducing the risk of type-2 diabetes...

    "Studies have shown that coffee consumption lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes," School of Medicine and Pharmacology Professor Kevin Croft also said, "This also included research on decaffeinated coffee, which suggested that the health benefits are from a compound in coffee apart from caffeine.

    "With this in mind, we studied the effects of Polyphenols, or more specifically CGAs, which are very rich in coffee but also found in tea and some fruits including plums. The CGAs were previously known for their health benefits, increasing insulin sensitivity and reducing blood pressure and body fat accumulation," he said.

    "However, this study proved the opposite in dosages equivalent to five or six cups of coffee per day," co-author WAIMR Assistant Professor Vance Matthews said.

    However, it's not all bad news for coffee lovers! According to the researchers it's still okay to drink moderate amounts.

    "It seems that the health effects are dose-dependent. A moderate intake of coffee, up to three to four cups a day still seems to decrease the risk of developing diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes," Assistant Professor Matthews said.
     
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  10. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Think about a cup of tea...

    Don't skip your afternoon cuppa.

    Research from the Western Australian University has found that drinking three cups of black tea per day lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressure. *Their research was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

    So bring out your bright, cheerful teapot and tea cup and keep your fluids up..

    * Blood pressure measurement consists of two numbers. The first is the systolic and measures blood pressure when the heart beats, or contracts to push blood through the body. The second number is the diastolic and measures the amount of pressure in between beats, when the heart is at rest.
     
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    Research finds Pink Lady Apples are better for you

    Flavonoid-rich apples such as Pink Lady can provide greater health benefits than other varieties, according to joint research by The University of Western Australia and Department of Agriculture and Food.

    "Our initial research showed for the first time that apples can improve clinical indications of cardiovascular health, including blood pressure and its response to stress," Assistant Professor Considine said.
     
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  12. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Have you just exercised - consider green tea.

    Following intensive exercise it is reported that a cup of green tea provides benefits beyond just fluid replenishment.

    It is reportedly demonstrated by a group of Taekwondo athletes. When given either water or the equivalent amount of green tea following a two hour training session, it was found that the tea drinkers had significantly improved mucosal immunity and higher levels of salivary antibacterial enzymes, enhancing their defence against microbial pathogens. Regular consumption of green tea may counter immune suppression.
     
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  13. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Blinded by the night?

    We have all read or been told that Spinach increased Popeye's strength however, the lutein content may also assist night vision.

    Along with the compound zeaxanthin, the dietary carotenoid lutein, found in green leafy vegetables is highly concentrated in the macula and is believed to play a major role in protecting the retina. It has been found that including green leafy vegetables in one's balanced diet enhanced contrast and glare sensitivity which may improve night vision!
     
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  14. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    The eyelid... How very thoughtful!

    Your eyelids love you. They must because every time you blink they use tears to gently clean and moisturize your eyes.

    That's up to 20,000 cleans a day - without you even thinking about it - so keep blinking.
     
  15. Poppet

    Poppet Nutritional Advisor
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    Immune Boosting Foods

    Citrus

    Citrus such as oranges, mandarins, grapefruit, lemons and limes are an excellent source of vitamin C which helps maintain the body’s defence against bacterial infections. Citrus has a unique type of fibre that, in studies, appears to dramatically reduce cholesterol.

    Carrot

    Carrots contain vitamin A precursors called carotenoids (Beta carotene) that help promote vision and support a healthy immune system.

    Turmeric

    Curcumin is the active ingredient in Turmeric, responsible for the distinct yellow colouring and the impressive list of health properties. Curcumin is anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, detoxifying and amazing for digestive health. Turmeric has been linked to the prevention of cancer cell growth and management of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, asthma, eczema and inflammatory bowel disease. It is a nutritional powerhouse, rich in manganese, zinc, B group vitamins and iron

    Papaya

    This golden fruit is so nutritionally rich that it is known as the medicine tree in Africa and the Caribbean. The enzyme papain is extracted from papaya, and is beneficial for those with digestive problems. Papaya is a rich source of beta-carotene, which converts to vitamin A in the body and promotes healthy eyes, skin and tissues

    Ginger

    Studies have shown that ginger has potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. It helps to boost immune function and combat cellular damage. This gut friendly spice stimulates digestion, gut motility and bowel function, while helping to relieve bloating, cramping and nausea. A recent study also found ginger to be as effective as pharmaceutical agents in relieving PMS pain in women.

    Garlic

    Garlic is also an immune system warrior, protecting the body from infections and illness. Garlic contains allicin, a potent phytonutrient that is great for cardiac health. It has been shown to help lower blood pressure, inhibit blood clotting and promote healthy cholesterol levels.

    Pineapple

    They are jam packed with B group vitamins including thiamine (B1) and B6, which are vital for energy metabolism and nerve function. Pineapples contain the enzyme bromelain, renowned for aiding protein digestion which allows your body to utilise immune boosting amino acids effectively.

    Protein

    Protein helps nourish your immune system, repair the body and assist recovery. Choose nutrient rich ones with a complete amino acid profile. Check out my protein calculator for more info.

    Cruciferous Vegetables

    These include kale, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage. They help support liver and immune function by boosting the liver’s ability to flush out toxins. Caution: whilst on blood thinning meds.

    Berries

    Rich in vitamin C and polyphenols that help promote healthy tissues and organs.
    Rich in vitamin C and polyphenols that help promote healthy tissues and organs.
     
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  16. Poppet

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    Vitamin D status linked with inflammation

    An observational study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism has demonstrated that vitamin D status is linked with immune markers of inflammation. This is also the first study to investigate the link between vitamin D and inflammatory ratios.

    Researchers analysed data from 957 Irish patients over 60 years of age. Individuals who were vitamin D deficient (<25 nmol/L) had significantly higher levels of the inflammatory biomarkers, compared to their peers who were not vitamin D deficient.

    Study results suggest that older adults who are vitamin D deficient may be at a greater risk of a pro-inflammatory immune profile, thus increasing susceptibility to conditions such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and cognitive dysfunction.

    Findings suggest that an adequate vitamin D status may be required for optimal immune function, particularly within the older adult population. Further randomised trials are needed to determine with certainty the vitamin D concentration that is optimal for immune function.
     
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    Vitamin E to improve bone health

    Fracture risk can be influenced by genetic constitution and environmental and lifestyle factors. However, during the past decade, it has become evident that oxidative stress associated with ageing is a fundamental pathogenetic mechanism of age-related bone loss and possibly sarcopenia – two important determinants that contribute to the risk of fracture.

    Alpha-tocopherol (Vitamin E) has been proposed to have positive effects on both bone and muscle mass due to its antioxidant properties. Cohort studies were used to determine whether vitamin E intake or serum concentrations are associated with fracture risks in older adults.

    In two independent cohorts, a high rate of feature was observed in the elderly that was associated with low intakes of vitamin E. There was also a higher risk of both osteoporosis and sarcopenia with low intakes of vitamin E.

    The researchers indicated that low intakes and serum concentrations of Alpha-tocopherol are associated with an increased rate of fracture in both elderly women and men.
     
  18. Poppet

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    Probiotics improve bone health

    Sufficient calcium intake has been reported to support bone growth and prevent bone loss during the ageing process. However, a positive effect of probiotics on bone metabolism and bone mass density has also been determined.

    Principal mechanisms by which probiotics may increase mineral bio-availability include:
    • increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids
    • production of bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate
    • reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density
    • bonding of food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria.
    Probiotics have shown potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms, and this has also been confirmed with outstanding results in the animal model.

    Post menopausal women who suffer from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bio-availability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density.
     
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  19. Poppet

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    Vitamin D benefits gum disease

    A randomised, double blind placebo controlled trial has analysed the effect of vitamin D on gingivitis, a common inflammatory disease of the gums. Doses of vitamin D ranged from 500-2000IU daily for three months, with gingival scores measured at each month.

    A significant anti-inflammatory effect was seen in all three vitamin D groups, with the fastest and largest improvement seen in the group receiving 2000IU per day. Serum vitamin D levels also increased proportionally to the dose of vitamin D received.

    The researchers concluded that vitamin D exhibits an effective and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect on gingivitis.
     
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  20. Poppet

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    Anti-inflammatory foods - just 200 grams per day

    Research published in the European Journal of Nutrition has indicated that 200 grams of anti-inflammatory food every day can help ward off diseases caused by chronic inflammation such as osteoarthritis and Alzheimer's.

    The University of Western Sydney researches found the most potent anti-inflammatory foods were oyster mushrooms, red sweet potatoes, onions, oregano, cinnamon and cloves!
     
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