TKR Nickel free cementless knee implant manufacturers?

Babsid

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Is there a lot st You f nickel free cementless total knee implants that are inserted with robotics?
 
Sorry about the typos.
Is there a List of manufacturers making total knee implants that are nickel free, cementless and performed with robotic surgery?
 
@Babsid Welcome to BoneSmart! Your surgeon will be able to advise you on the implant that will be needed. If you tell us where you are located, we might be able help you find surgeon.
 
Hi thanks for your quick response. I have a surgeon. he would use Smith and nephew, nickel free replacement. I am looking for a nickel free replacement that can be done with robotic, assisted techniques. Thanks any other information welcome.
 
I also wish to add that there are studies now showing that larger amounts of nickel are transmitted during manual (as opposed to robotic assisted) knee replacement through the cutting blocks.(jigs) and the saws.
Therefore , my question is: is it better to just have a robotic replacement as in robotic assisted Stryker Mako implant which only has trace amts of nickel and also is cementless… any thoughts… other research welcome
 
I have a nickel allergy. They did use the mako robot for the partial replacements. I also had to have an osteotomy, which was not robot assisted. I don't know what brand I have, but they are ceramic coated titanium with a hard plastic "button" on the back of the knee cap. I don't know if the plate for the osteotomy was ceramic coated as well. Also, when I was 14 I had a plate and a rod placed for a tub/fib break. I had no nickel allergy issues with any of this.
 
Thank you Irj. I’m going to proceed with the LT blood testing from Ortho analysis. This tests for several metals and cement. Hopefully this will give me more information to aide in my decision making.More studies needed in this area for sure!
 
The Ortho Analysis test should give you an extra bit of information that may help with your decision.

The research into the topic of metal ion release during the actual procedure itself is relatively new, so there is not much data available. If you’ve been reviewing it, I’m sure you’ve seen that the latest studies focused on the types of implants used and not the saw blades, cutting blocks, and other metal items used during any surgery. There is still more work to be done.

Be sure and discuss all this with your surgeon. Hopefully he is up to date with the latest research and can help choose the best implant for you. If you have major concerns, it wouldn’t hurt to get another opinion or two before deciding. No matter what implant you choose, please do consider the skill of the surgeon (as in how many of these knee replacements he does annually) as being one of the most critical factors. A skilled surgeon spends less time in your knee for the procedure and often will do less tissue manipulation.
 
Thanks Jamie. Awaiting my blood test results for nickel allergy. Yes. I feel confident in my surgeon . He has performed over 1000 TKR over past 3 years w robotic assist.(mako) .
He also continues to do manual TKR’s and has a history of over 10 years doing that. I feel like I’m in good hands. Just would ideally like to have a cementless nickel free component & Im not finding that so far. Best. B
 
Hello, I’m scheduled for knee replacement in 4 weeks, probably total replacement but he wants to make final decision of total or partial in the OR when he can see everything . I’m pretty sure I have a nickel allergy ( break out in rash to watch latches; cheap silver jewelry) so they plan to use a nickel free Smith and Nephew component and a Stryker robot, but not sure if it is cementless. What are the disadvantages of implant with cement?
 
I also wish to add that there are studies now showing that larger amounts of nickel are transmitted during manual (as opposed to robotic assisted) knee replacement through the cutting blocks.(jigs) and the saws.
Therefore , my question is: is it better to just have a robotic replacement as in robotic assisted Stryker Mako implant which only has trace amts of nickel and also is cementless… any thoughts… other research welcome
Can you please tell us when your surgery is scheduled? Or, if not yet on schedule at least which knee will be done? We need this information to create a signature for you and to get you on one of our surgery teams.

It would be helpful if you could provide links to the studies you’ve reviewed regarding this topic. I’ve not seen any that specifically targeted “manual” versus robotic surgery in terms of metal released. The ones I’m familiar with showed metal coming from the saws and cutting blocks in both types of surgeries. There was some mention of greater amounts of metal in surgeries where the doctor applied stronger pressure in the cuts, which mean a benefit to robotics because the pressure would be uniform in all cases. But I don’t recall seeing anything like that included in the conclusions.
 
@Babsid, please give us the date of your surgery and which knee it will be. This information makes it easy to see on each of your posts when added to your signature.
 
Right now it’s my right knee and scheduled for March 18 but I think I will be rescheduling due to going where a robotic assist can be used.
 
I’ll locate the links. My surgeon told me there was no nickel in the Mako Stryker robotic assists . He has done 1000 surgeries with it. I’ll add the study re nickel in manual saw blades & cutting blocks. Smith and nephew company also reported directly to me that their Cori robotic assist does not contain nickel.

Here’s the email response to my question:

“I don’t specifically have a document that states it is nickel free, but I do have the technical specs that state our instruments are made from Stainless Steel, Aluminum Alloy, PTFE and Titanium Alloy.



Please let me know if more documents are needed and I can reach out to our Quality team.



Thank you!



Sale’s Support [email protected]
 
Many titanium alloys do include nickel.

The article you cited states, in reviewing their data:
"The substantial degree of Ni generation resulting from performing a hypoallergenic “nickel-free” TKA calls into questions the rationale of utilizing more expensive lower Ni components on the basis of known or suspected Ni or Cr allergy."
 
The finding that the largest amount of nickel appears to come from the cutting blocks & saw blades is significant.
“The interference between the sawblades and cut blocks seems to be the major source of nickel and chromium ions.”
They tested both nickel free and regular TKR’s , both showed significant levels of nickel from the debris that occurs between the cutting blocks and the saw blades.
 
Hi Babsid and Welcome to BoneSmart!
I've created a signature for you with the date you provided. When / if you cancel, let us know and we will edit accordingly. I hope you have a nice week. Thanks for joining us! :wave:
@Babsid
 

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