Lounge Doctor
Ask the Expert Webinar

THR Lisa’s LTHR June 24,2020

Lisa’s Petals

new member
Joined
Aug 5, 2020
Messages
4
Age
53
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hello everyone! Boy, do I ever wish I had found this forum sooner. I was looking up some symptoms last night and found you. I guess better late than never, since my recovery is definitely still a work in progress .
I’m 52, and began having pain in my left hip a couple of years ago. It seemed to come on rather suddenly, so I was surprised that x-rays showed arthritis. I finally had my hip replaced on 6/24/20. I have some underlying conditions, and that may be contributing to my frustratingly slow recovery.
I’m just so thankful to have found this forum. I’ve been reading recovery threads and have also found lots of wonderful information threads. I know I’ve already said it, but I’ll say it again. I sure wish I found this forum sooner. Lisa
 

Layla

SENIOR FORUM ADVISOR
Senior Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
23,641
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
:welome: to BoneSmart and recovery. Thanks for joining us, we’re glad you found us! You’re still very early into your recovery so you can expect some ups and downs. Below you’ll find the Recovery Guidelines. Please read through the short articles when you have time, I believe you’ll find them informative. Let us know if you have any questions and we’ll do our best to advise.

Stop back often, we’d love to follow your progress and support you along the way.
A great rest of the week to you!


Hip Recovery: The Guidelines
1. Don’t worry: Your body will heal all by itself. Relax, let it, don't try and hurry it, don’t worry about any symptoms now, they are almost certainly temporary
2. Control discomfort:
rest
ice
take your pain meds by prescription schedule (not when pain starts!)​
3. Do what you want to do BUT
a. If it hurts, don't do it and don't allow anyone - especially a physical therapist - to do it to you
b. If your leg swells more or gets stiffer in the 24 hours after doing it, don't do it again.
4. PT or exercise can be useful BUT take note of these
5. At week 4 and after you should follow this
6. Access to these pages on the website

Pain management and the pain chart
Healing: how long does it take?
Chart representation of THR recovery

Dislocation risk and 90 degree rule
Energy drain for THRs
Pain and swelling control: elevation is the key
Post op blues is a reality - be prepared for it
Myth busting: on getting addicted to pain meds
Sleep deprivation is pretty much inevitable - but what causes it?

BIG TIP: Hips actually don't need any exercise to get better. They do a pretty good job of it all on their own if given half a chance. Trouble is, people don't give them a chance and end up with all sorts of aches and pains and sore spots. All they need is the best therapy which is walking and even then not to excess.

We try to keep the forum a positive and safe place for our members to talk about their questions or concerns and to report successes with their joint replacement surgery.

While members may create as many threads as they like in a majority of BoneSmart's forums, we ask the at each member have only one recovery thread. This policy makes it easier to go back and review history before providing advice.
@Lisa’s Petals
 

Hip4life

graduate
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
568
Age
63
Location
Nebraska
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Welcome! I’m so glad I found this forum and I’m glad you did as well. The members have been immeasurably helpful on my hip journey. Just let us know how we can support you.
 

Trudijane

member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
126
Age
65
Location
San Francisco
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hi Lisa,

I’ll leave the advice to the many people who have helped me over the past year plus.

I remember I felt just as you did when I discovered this group. I wish I had discovered it before my surgery, but it was 2 months after my operation that I had, and they have helped me enormously when I needed it the most!

You’re definitely in the right place!
Trudi
 
OP
OP
L

Lisa’s Petals

new member
Joined
Aug 5, 2020
Messages
4
Age
53
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Thank you for the quick and warm welcome! It’s been comforting to read that the recovery timeline is different for everyone and that I still seem to fall within the “typical” range.

I made the mistake of leaning heavily on some well intended, but not so helpful advice and experiences of two people who had THRS. My first issue was an unrealistic expectation about the level of pain after surgery. My friend told me that she felt better (pain-wise) leaving the hospital post-op, than she did when she was admitted for surgery. She must have been in some terrible pain beforehand, because I was hurting a LOT more leaving the hospital than when I came in for surgery! This left me wondering if something was wrong medically, or if I was a complete wimp. From my reading here last night and today, I realize that everyone is different and will experience various levels of pain.

Both this friend, and an acquaintance told me that the most important thing was to get moving as soon as possible after surgery and do the exercises no matter what. I was up and around as much as I could handle beginning the day I was discharged. By 6/29, both feet, ankles, and legs were grossly swollen.

I had waited through the weekend before calling my surgeon, because I didn’t want to be sent to the ER. Unfortunately, that’s exactly where he sent me when I called that Monday morning. It was horribly busy in the ER. I spent 9 hours sitting in a wheelchair in the waiting room, being wheeled into the back for various tests. There were no beds available in the ER, so I was brought back into the waiting room between tests.

Thankfully, they determined that I did not have any blood clots. I did have a low grade fever, high WBC, low RBC, and some impressive bilateral fluid buildup. As a side note, my long awaited first grandchild was born as I sat in the ER waiting room. It wasn’t exactly how we had pictured things.

I was sent home Monday night with instructions to follow up with my surgeon. My 7 day post-op visit was scheduled for Wednesday morning, so I saw my surgeon then. He was pleased with the appearance of my incision, and my ability to walk. He felt that perhaps some medication was in order to reduce the fluid in my legs. He referred me to my primary care Dr. as he wasn’t accustomed to prescribing that type of medication.

The following day, I received Lasix from my PC Dr. I had gained 13lbs of fluid since my discharge from the hospital. I asked for a urinalysis thinking that the catheter I required in the hospital might have brought on a bladder infection. (I have MS, and occasionally my bladder will spasm making it difficult to urinate. Of course that’s exactly what it did my first night in the hospital.) No UTI was found on Wednesday 7/2/20. All they seemed to focus on in regards to my fever was Covid. I was tested, and received my negative results 18 days later.

Here I am today, still running a little fever, feeling exhausted all the time, and wondering if it’s normal. The swelling went down like magic with the Lasix. The excess 13lbs was gone in two days. I still occasionally take one on the few mornings that I wake up with swollen feet. The skin of my L thigh is completely numb to the touch on the surface, but painful to deeper touch. I could literally draw a line around the border on my thigh of “dead feeling” skin, and skin that has normal sensation. My PT guy thought it had something to do with my MS. I disagree. I could be wrong, but it just doesn’t have that familiar MS feeling to me. The issue appeared after surgery.

I AM definitely much better than I was several weeks ago, but I just don’t feel right. A bit of depression has been creeping up on me, as a result of everything. It’s been a bit overwhelming to deal with the THRs, only getting to see my new granddaughter twice (outdoors, from a safe distance), the general isolation that this virus has caused, and the feeling of being slightly unwell without knowing the cause. Anyone have any thoughts about my symptoms? Is it pretty normal to keep running a low grade fever, or should I be asking my Dr. to look further into it? Thanks for any suggestions. I’m feeling a bit frustrated and overwhelmed.

Lisa
 

Ava J

junior member
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
68
Age
33
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
I've seen some people run a low-grade fever for a while after the surgery. This has happened to me a couple of nights with my first hip replacement, but it wasn't several nights in a row, and only lasted a week. Others had it go on for a month. Low grade fever, in my uneducated opinion, is a way of your body showing that it's worn out, just a gentle reminder it's time to medicate and sleep. Or just sleep. I even had that low grade fever spike after I gave birth to both of my kids. With this second hip, it's not happening. I am much more gentle on myself though. With that, just try and see what time of the day the low grade starts. If it's close enough to bed time, just sleep. <3

Do you eat enough? Do you hydrate enough? Do you sleep enough (8-10 hrs/day)? Lower your levels of stress because some things you can't fix no matter what you do, so don't hurt your recovery by worrying about them.

Numbness on skin can be normal, could be a symptom. Again. Bring it up with your surgeon and primary care doctor. If they shrug if off, keep an eye on your symptoms and record them for a few more days.

Your leg is recovering from being cut up. CUT UP. Of course it will feel weird for a while. I had surgeries as a toddler and scars from those stopped feeling weird to the touch in my late teenage years! After getting a hip replacement this time around, my scar already felt better/less weird to touch than when I was a teen. Everything is different every time. Your body is tricky that way, so take good care of it.
 

Hip4life

graduate
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
568
Age
63
Location
Nebraska
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
The numbness of various places and tissues is pretty normal as is the fatigue especially if you have MS. The ongoing fever, at this point, I think I would be talking with my surgeon and or his team about. May be nothing but better safe than sorry. The blues unfortunately are also a common thing with the environment we’re in just adding its special twist. Again, something to monitor, share with those who can sympathize and if it doesn’t improve or worsens, be sure to talk with your doctor about it. You’re still early in your recovery. We’ve got willing ears and lots of support. Keep us in the loop and I hope things start to settle soon. ❤
 

Layla

SENIOR FORUM ADVISOR
Senior Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
23,641
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hello Lisa, I’m happy you’re finding some comfort reading through others threads.
Let me try to address some of your concerns. Numbness is fairly common and can last for months. Mine did, but the area slowly became smaller and smaller until one day I realized it was gone. Small sensory nerve fibers are cut with the incision. These nerve fibers run from the inside to the outside of the hip and cutting them causes the hip to feel numb after surgery. It is a temporary sensation that normally resolves over a period of six months to one year post op. I believe mine lasted a little longer.

While healing you may experience sensations of tingling, pins and needles, itching, burning and even the feeling of a minor electrical shock. These are usually good signs that the nerves are spontaneously firing through the regeneration process.

As far as mobility, You can be as mobile as you like, within reason. If you’re walking and you want to increase distance, do it slowly. Test the waters with any new activity, please don’t just jump in. Let your body and comfort level be your guide. It also wouldn’t hurt to ice preventatively if you’ve had a day full of activity. You can refer to the instructions under ICE in the Recovery Guidelines above.

Energy Drain - You're certainly not alone in experiencing that.
Our body's energy supply isn't limitless. So when we're in healing mode after major surgery our energy will be used for healing first, not leaving a great reserve for all the other activity of daily life. It is completely normal to feel tired for quite some time. How long....most likely relates to your body's rate of healing. Making our best effort to get adequate sleep and rest is beneficial. Our body does it's best healing while we're sleeping.Please review the article on Energy Drain in the Recovery Guidelines above.

Depression - You’ve been through so much, it’s understandable you’d be feeling down. Add to the emotional rollercoaster of THR, the birth of a grandchild child, the issues you suffered and the crazy world of Covid were all trying to navigate and IT IS difficult! Please know we’re here for you and will be as you continue healing, so stop by often.

Swelling - In my time here, I learned from, Sr Admin. Jamie, that it’s our lymph system that rids the body of fluid (swelling). So you want to get the fluid to the lymph nodes in your torso area so your body can more quickly process it. The lymph system works rather slowly on it’s own and much more efficiently with the assistance of gravity. The fluid isn’t draining into the hips, but contained with the lymph system and moving to the torso and lymph nodes located there. A colleague of ours on the hip side, CricketHip is involved in Therapeutic Massage and has often shared this helpful exercise to assist in manual lymph drainage. You may want to give it a try. I have, myself, and it’s very easy. This gentle, yet effective therapy will help prime your lymphatic system to move fluid and inflammation away from your leg, which in turn will help your range of motion and pain -

While laying supine, take deep breaths...deep, as in breathing in to a count of 5, 4, or 3 seconds, whatever is most comfortable for you. Hold that breath for another count of 5, 4, 3 then blow out completely, still using the count that's comfortable for you. A series of at least 6 reps may help get the excess swelling to move. To ensure you are taking proper deep breaths, place your hand on your naval and watch while taking in your breath, if doing this properly you should see your hand move up. Repeat this whenever you feel up to it during the day or night. Lying flat (supine) is best as the lymph nodes seated in your groin are less restricted, allowing for better lymph flow.

In addition, after the breathing exercise, place your hands lightly on your upper thigh, at the crease in your groin and lightly stroke upwards towards your naval. Be patient because it can take the body time to respond. If you have further questions on this, please tag CricketHip, I know she’d be happy to help you.

Lastly, your fever - A low grade fever (less than 101.5 F) during the first week after surgery is a normal response by the body to the stress of surgery. It is most often caused by inflammatory response to the tissue injury sustained during surgery. After the first week if you have a fever that lingers for more than a few days, or if a fever over 101.5F begins several days after surgery, it's recommended that you contact your physician. I’m sure a member of his care team will either offer you reassurance or advice once they’ve asked a few questions.

Wishing you comfort and a peaceful evening.
 

zauberflöte

alpha
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
5,501
Age
68
Location
Central Virginia
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@Lisa’s Petals you have had anexciting time of it, haven't you!
Congratulations on that first grandbaby! I know how you feel, our hard-won first was born just days before they stopped letting even daddy into the hospital.
Ugh ER story, yay Lasix. What a relief!
Numbness, ah yes. I have two anteriors, and they each have distinctive and unique numb spots. After 7 years, the right is beginning to think about fading. At three years, the left is having a growth spurt, go figure. I laughed when you said you could draw a line around yours-- I have done that! :snork: I'm not expecting miracles here... I have a 31-yr-old transverse abdominal scar that still has a little numb line around it.
:flwrysmile:
 
OP
OP
L

Lisa’s Petals

new member
Joined
Aug 5, 2020
Messages
4
Age
53
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Thanks so very much everyone. I don’t feel so alone in this hip business anymore. Ava asked some rather important questions. I must admit that the answer to all 3 is ,”probably not”. I try to drink as much as I can during the day, but I sometimes forget. It’s something I’ve really been working on because my muscle spasms have always been more frequent when I’m not well hydrated. This goes double now that I’ve had HRS and it’s hot out. I’m a real outdoor lover, but the heat is horrible for my MS. I try to get my outdoor time early and late when it’s this hot. I’m not sleeping real well, and I’m sure I don’t eat enough. My Dr. had already warned me before surgery that I was somewhat underweight and anemic. I don’t have much appetite and eating often feels like a chore.
Layla, thanks for all the great advice, especially the lymphatic massage. I had read something about it from Cricket, but didn’t remember where. I did a bit of it last night before I fell asleep. I didn’t notice any fluid in my feet this morning, so I’m happy about that. I don’t have fever over 101F. It usually lingers in the 99.9-100.8 range. It’s just high enough in the afternoons to worry the temperature people at various appointments. It’s also just high enough to prevent me from getting past the gate of my parents retirement community. It gets a little frustrating, but I don’t blame them for being careful.
I’ve been using the heating pad more than ice lately. I think I’ll go back to ice again for swelling and pain.
I’m at the end of my insurance approved home PT visits, and I’ve decided not to go in for further sessions. I can’t imagine getting ready and out the door twice a week for PT. My home PT said walking was the best form of PT, and I can do that without going to appointments.
Thanks again everyone. This is THE place to be! Lisa
 

Ava J

junior member
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
68
Age
33
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
@Lisa’s Petals,

Fine. Eating is a chore. But you have MS and many other things going on. Eating is also fuel. You cannot expect your body to churn out proper healing processes if it has nothing to go on, right? Smoothies, protein shakes, soups, salads. 1 cup at a time, they don't have to be big meals, just consistent. Consider it your next prescription. Nurture your body so it has the energy and the stamina to fight.

As for hydrating, your body knows how much you need. I forget all the time too, but like you, I also know the effects of when I didn't have enough. Make a little effort every day to prepare your daily water and meals. Must, must, must.

Sleep is harder, but if you sleep better (once you eventually can), your mood will improve.

As always though, one thing at a time one day at a time. Today you may choose to rest better. Tomorrow you may be in the mood to eat better. But every little effort, every day, will get you feeling better.

Luck!
 

Layla

SENIOR FORUM ADVISOR
Senior Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
23,641
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
My Dr. had already warned me before surgery that I was somewhat underweight and anemic. I don’t have much appetite and eating often feels like a chore.
If meat poultry, leafy greens, nuts or seeds, to name a few for anemia don’t sound appealing, consider small snacks at least for energy.

If you’re not consuming enough protein throughout the day it can contribute to fatigue. Protein also provides the body with fuel and it helps repair damaged body tissues. Since protein breaks down slower than carbs, it’s a longer lasting energy source. Following are a few ideas which could be consumed as snacks if you’re not feeling that hungry. Maybe a couple will appeal to you.

I hope you’re staying adequately hydrated also. Try fruit slices in your water, Lemons, Limes, Oranges if you find that apppealing. Cucumber and Fresh Mint, another option.

Nuts
Trail Mix
Turkey roll ups (cheese or veggies rolled inside the turkey)
Greek Yogurt
Cottage Cheese
Hard Boiled Eggs
Tuna
Veggies & Hummus
Peanut Butter and Apple
Peanut Butter on Celery
Cheese Slices
Beef Sticks
Protein Bars
Protein Shakes
Canned Salmon on Crackers
Edamame
Chicken Salad
No Bake Energy Bites (many online recipes)

Hope today is a good one!
@Lisa’s Petals
 

Layla

SENIOR FORUM ADVISOR
Senior Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
23,641
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hello and Happy Two Month Anniversary, Lisa!
Hopefully you’re doing better and enjoying progress since you last posted.
We’d love to hear from you as time allows.
All the best!
@Lisa’s Petals
 
OP
OP
L

Lisa’s Petals

new member
Joined
Aug 5, 2020
Messages
4
Age
53
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Thank you both, Layla and Ava J. Sorry about going AWOL for a while. It’s those blues getting to me as much as the slow healing. I’m definitely getting better, but it’s slower than I expected and I’m exhausted all the time.
Thank you for the eating suggestions. I have been drinking protein smoothies and little protein snacks as much as possible. I do have an X-ray and followup appointment with my surgeon on Thursday. I’m sure he will say my hip is fine, and refer me back to my primary for blood work. I’m still running low grade fevers, although not every day anymore. I’m just SO exhausted it’s crazy. If I go see my new granddaughter and stop at the store afterwards, I’m worthless the next day. I’m talking about the stay in bed and rest kind of tired after an outing. The day after THAT, my hip and thigh feel stiff from laying around the previous day. I’m not doing the PT exercises. I think they were making me more sore. Walking around is good for me, but the heat has been keeping me indoors lately. I can’t tolerate any heat at all, due to my MS. I tend to get very down when I don’t spend enough time outdoors. I’m trying to get out early and later, so that I still get some outdoor time. This is normally a hard time of year for me. The heat keeps me cooped up, while my prize garden needs constant watering. It’s not a great combination under the best of circumstances. Adding the hip surgery and the virus makes it all the more challenging.
Thank you for checking up on me! I truly appreciate it.
 

Layla

SENIOR FORUM ADVISOR
Senior Forum Advisor
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
23,641
Location
Minnesota
Gender
Female
Country
United States United States
Hello @Lisa’s Petals
Happy Three Month Anniversary!
I hope the blues, fever and fatigue have lifted and you‘re feeling more energized and encouraged with your recovery. Please let us know how you’re doing...we’re here for support.
Wishing you a wonderful end to the week!
 

New

Active Antibacterial

BoneSmart #1 Best Blog

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
52,867
Messages
1,403,910
BoneSmarties
32,947
Latest member
RubiJane
Recent bookmarks
0

Top Bottom