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is there a best new material for a new hip

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by tyorke1, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. tyorke1

    tyorke1
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    Mine is getting done in Jan , Doctor said I can use what ever type I want. I am very active, scratch golfer, gym nut before this got worse. I am wondering what type should I use .
     
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  2. alexthecat

    alexthecat Moderator

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    As was said the last time you asked this question, this is a choice that is best left to your surgeon. He or she is the one with the education and experience to make that decision. Here is your previous thread this topic:
    https://bonesmart.org/forum/index.php?threads/39545/

    Sent from my Z799VL using Tapatalk
     
  3. tyorke1

    tyorke1
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    whoops , forgot I posted this, sorry,
     
  4. Horseshoe

    Horseshoe

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    @tyorke1 congrats on getting a thr date! I too was interested in implant materials and researched the different types. BS has a link that describes the various bearing combinations, think it's in the library. I ended up with ceramic on poly for the first hip and a surprise metal on poly for the second. So far, so good, fingers crossed, though it's much too soon to tell.

    Probably good to have a discussion with your surgeon. What does OS advise for you?
     
  5. Jaycey

    Jaycey Moderator

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    Sounds a bit silly to me. It's like me telling a plumber how I want my drain fixed. The doctor is the expert. Put this question back on him and ask for his recommendation given your life style and activity level.
     
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  6. sfbaylover

    sfbaylover

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    I am due to have a ceramic on poly hip replacement in December of this year. I, too agonized over which material and prosthesis is best. The consensus seems to be that they are all pretty much the same, with no one specific type of implant or material being any better than another. Prior to my consultation with my hip surgeon in March of this year, I was expecting to receive a large-ball ceramic on ceramic hip prosthesis, but I was shocked when my surgeon recommended a ceramic on poly hip (36mm head). The research I did prior to my consultation seemed to indicate that for young, active patients (I'm 43), a ceramic ball mated to a ceramic bearing would offer the greatest wear resistance. And in actual trials, that seems to be the case (at least in the numerous studies and publications I have read measuring the wear rates in clinical studies). However, the newer poly bearings used nowadays show almost as good a wear resistance as the ceramic and are supposed to be more forgiving in terms of how they are positioned (alignment issues) and also may offer greater durability against (cracking/shattering).

    But you will hear differences of opinion depending on whom you ask. Some surgeons prefer to use the tried-and-true prosthetic materials; others believe in experimenting and using different materials for different situations. The best thing is to select a highly competent and experienced hip surgeon and then trust his/her judgement as to which type of prosthesis and approach he/she wishes to use.

    I'm having my hip replaced by Thomas Sculco at HSS in New York City. He is the surgeon-in-chief-emeritus and has been doing hip replacements since the late 1960s, so he is one of the most experienced surgeons at that hospital. So, I trust his judgement and know that I will be in good hands.
     
  7. GrannyC

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    That is not a question I ever considered. I chose a fantastic OS with a lot of experience and felt he would use the best and most appropriate implant for me. I did ask post op what he used but have not even researched it as he said it will last the rest of my life so I'll take that and am happy with it. Good luck!
     
  8. Carnifexblue

    Carnifexblue

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    I was convinced uncemented ceramic on ceramic was best for me. I was 62 when I had my hip replaced and active. In the end I had a cemented metal on poly. I know there were cost considerations imposed on my surgeon by the Trust and that worried me.....still does but I went with it because I trusted my surgeon. Another surgeon I know gave me a convincing argument for it and that was reassuring as was to some extent, the NJR data. Time will tell. I am a regular fellwalker, cyclist, horse rider and swimmer and the hip has given me a new lease of life. There must be better recording of activity levels connected with joint replacement however if longevity is to mean anything......
     
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  9. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    Actually no there isn't. There are presently only materials used:
    For the femoral component: stainless steel, cobalt chrome, titanium
    For the acetabular shell: cobalt chrome, titanium, ceramic
    For the cup liner: polyethylene or ceramic

    All have been tried and tested over the years and have proven very reliable.
    He did? I'd be a little leery of this. Usually surgeons have a long experience with one or two devices and stick to using them. They have experience with those devices and therefore have expertise. You only get one chance to get this done right, you know.
     
  10. tyorke1

    tyorke1
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    Materials have improved greatly, my doc I believe likes ceramic on ceramic but he also mentioned ceramic on poly. Sometimes these forums have as much info as your doctor!!. My needs are a material that handles my life style also I work in corrections and I need the material that is least prone to being dislocated. Another question roughly how long will it take to get healed enough to lesson the chances of dislocation. I know a lot depends on circumstance but a rough idea.
     
  11. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR Administrator

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    Why thank you!
    That was my point in my previous post but looking back, maybe I didn't state it more clearly. They ALL will handle your life style - any lifestyle!
    It's not the materials that are 'prone' to dislocation - that is purely down to the skill of the surgeon and how he implants the device. Most dislocations occur because there is malalignment in either the cup or the stem and sometimes even both!
    I made these charts on healing and dislocation risk to give you a rough idea

    a THR recovery chart.jpg

    dislocation risk small.jpg
     
  12. amb3k9

    amb3k9

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    The way they have the materials now, they typically don't wear out. Short term data has shown the cross linked material has been about 2 orders of magnitude less than previous. More likely for young and active is aseptic loosening I would imagine as opposed to wearing out the joint due to high activity. I am more excited about new cartilage stem cell replacement or porous scaffold femoral stem materials to join with bones to make it stronger. Will be coming down the pipe in a few years, but as always, everything "new" is not always best. Ex: metal on metal components.
     

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