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Choosing a Dr

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jacksv153

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After reading posts on here I decided to dig deeper to find a revision specialist.
So I found one and made an appointment.
Then I went on WebMD and found out that he is only 40 years old!
I will ask him tomorrow if he does at least 50 per year which was suggested on this site.
I worry that he is too young to have enough experience at the same time my first OS was late 50's early 60's and he is the reason I have to go have this re-done. Your thoughts?
 

Haley4

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It would be to go and hear him out. i went to many of different ages ect. the one i'm going with is in his early 40's and doctors even out of his network have good things to say about him. its really up to you but i feel age isn't the most important thing its his skill ask around about him and ask him all the queations you have big or small and go with your gut. thats what i'm doing. good luck tomorrow let us know how it goes.
 

KarriB

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Yes, ask how many he does, but my revision specialist was in his late 30s when he operated on me and it didn't bother me at all. Nurses, PTs, OTs, aides all professed their respect for him and desire to observe him at work in the OR. One aide asked if she could be present while he examined me! He also took time to answer my questions and saw me twice a week at his offices for a month while I was recovering from my infection. The best part...I didn't pick him! He was at the hospital when I was sent in for emergency surgery.

You need to be comfortable with your choice, so ask questions. I've heard of plenty of older docs I wouldn't want working on me.
 

PolarBear60

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My surgeon is in his late 30s. I have the utmost confidence in him, even though I don't think he does the recommended number of TKRs per year. (I didn't ask) Bring your list of questions, talk to the surgeon, and see what you think. Roy's suggestion is a solid one as well.

As Karri says, there are plenty of older surgeons I wouldn't want working on me. It all depends upon how well they have kept up with the industry. Ask about his processes and why he's chosen to use them. Ask about his philosophy for recovery. If you're not sure about something, ask why he's chosen to go that route. If his answers make sense, you're probably in the right place. If you feel comfortable with this person, this is a good thing. If his answers don't make sense, he's not willing to explain things, or you don't feel comfortable, consider looking elsewhere. Not every excellent doctor can do these things well, and not every doctor who exudes confidence, has a great bedside manner, and competently answers your questions is guaranteed to be a great surgeon, so there's room to go with your gut on whether you've made a solid choice or not.
 

zzevi

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My personally experience has been my O.S. is older and had been my dr, when I've had issues with my knee before, my shoulder and my back with the had a slipped disc. I was happy with him and never gave it another thought that I wouldn't have him do this tkr surgery. He did a fine job on the surgery end, but I don't remember seeing him the whole time I was at the hospital to check in on me, associates to their clinic did, I believe he probably was the one that was consulted for any issues I had. Follow up appts, again saw very little of the surgeon a P/A took out my staples the surgeon was present. But at about 6 wks out when I began having issues with my incision, he was available once or twice and after that, he had some personal issues himself that keep him out of the clinic, but did he turn my records and care over to a associate because I was having issues with healing at this point. NO.....he left p/t to deal with my wound care and when it finally got out of hand, I was referred to a wound care clinic. In the end after having this surgeon for other issues and always liking him, I felt when I needed him the most he disappointed me and I let him know this. He was very smug about the whole thing, thinking he had done everything possible for me, which I disagree with. To say the least, when my 1yr follow up appt comes up, I'll have a different O.S. This whole experience turned me off from this surgeon, his associates, and the hospital. Guess in the end, just because someone is older and experience doesn't mean much when there follow up care is lacking. Since my surgery I've heard from others about their dissatisfaction with this surgeon. I needed to have done more checking him out for tkr. Get as much information as possible about your surgeons surgical record, but in the end don't base it on their age. Look for a surgeon that will be there thru the whole process.
 

Celle

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If he is an orthopaedic specialist, he will have had additional training and experience, to qualify. 40 is old enough to have received that training and experience.
It is important, though, to make sure that he specialises in knees and hips and is not a generalist orthopaedic surgeon.

My own surgeon is only in his early forties and he has new skills that he has been teaching to the other orthopaedic surgeons in my town. He is the one the others send their problem patients to, for assessment and revisions.

Five years ago, he did a revision of my right knee, from a partial replacement to a total replacement. two years ago he did a total replacement on my left knee. Both knees are really good now and I am completely satisfied with my surgeon.
 

FlaGranny

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My surgeon is on the young side, but I was referred to him by an older doctor I have known for many years. He is probably in his early 40s, may be younger (he looks young). He was also mentioned by my GP as being very good. He is actually chief of orthopedics at the hospital. Nurses at the hospital said I chose the best. He is a hip and knee surgeon only and experienced revision surgeon. Does hundreds of surgeries a year. So, no, being younger is not a problem. One nurse told me she always tried to be on duty for his surgeries so she could take care of his patients. Nurses in the preop area said his PA was very good too.
 

newlybionic

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My second OS had just turned 50. I don't really care about their age, I do care about their ability though. Sometimes it's almost impossible to get accurate info about an OS. My original OS was in his 40s. They both looked good on paper. The original one was a partner of a doctor that I had been seeing in that group. Little did I know he wasn't very good. He was the only hip/knee replacement OS in the local hospital. I found out when I met my current OS that he wasn't very good and had been fired from his previous group. I also found out from a nurse that does home visits that he totally destroyed someone's knees and they couldn't sue for much. That OS had a large number of cases filed against him.
 
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