THR Charlie's RTHR Recovery Thread

Jaycey

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I guess at 8 weeks I expected more progress. The whole surgery was advertised as 6 weeks back up and running.
I can't tell you how many times I have heard this from our members. "So and so was running marathons at 2 months out of surgery." Complete and utter rubbish!

Unfortunately surgeons often set unrealistic expectations. For several years I worked with a very experienced orthopaedic surgeon. He said that until he nursed his Father through TKR recovery, he had no idea how complex, tedious and frustrating the process could be. As a result, he now advises his patient totally differently.

And now you know why BoneSmart was created. So many members like you come here frustrated or hurting because they are trying reach silly milestones.

There are no milestones for this recovery. That hip is in charge now. Listen to it and it will very quickly tell you when you have gone too far.
it makes me wonder 'do i push through or pull back' all the time...
Never push through. If something doesn't feel right, back off and try again another day. What seems impossible at the time, will be easy a bit further into the process.
 

Pumpkin

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My PT's view: we ignore (ie dont treat) issues with non operated leg or lower back and stick to business with operated leg. Does that make sense?
IMO, If the rest of your body is not supporting your healing, your poor operated leg has to work harder.
PT should be able to connect the dots to how impairments in other areas are having a negative effect on your operated leg to justify treating other areas of your body.
It is all back to that old song we learned in Kindergarten, the knee bone is connected to the leg bone and so on.

Also anyone ever use Feldenkrais method in recovery?
Feldenkrais can be helpful to your recovery. The person you are learning from should be sensitive to the needs of someone recovering from a joint replacement.
 
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Charlie33

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@Layla @Pumpkin @Jaycey Thanks all for feedback.

So I went to scheduled PT today (almost didn’t :heehee:) and told him I wasn’t up for much and was in some pain/tweaked. So he proposed instead of usual body oragami he had me do some NEW exercises that were simple and I was very tentative..but also OLD slightly more difficult ones that I was familiar with and did easily….he did this to prove a point that paying *some* attention to the ‘mental’ side of recovery, learning to trust your hip and body again, and recovering your mojo important too. Fair point, and had no pain doing exercises…but still believe main point is listen to body and progress sensibly. And yes you can all fire away at me from even showing up at PT knowing how I posted earlier…yes we men are stupid.
 
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Layla

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Not going to fire away at you, Charlie. It is your choice. I just don't want to see you in the ODIC.

Trust and listen to the signals your body gives you. Treat yourself with TLC, you are recovering from major surgery. You are in charge and please get comfortable with saying, No, if anything causes you discomfort or pain because you're the one that will suffer, not him.

Have a nice evening!
@Charlie33
 

Mojo333

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I know I went through the same scenario to a degree, and felt like, obviously, since I was only 53, extremely heaththy (save the trashed hip joints) no underlying conditions, etc... etc...
that I did not want to feel behind the curve, especially with the Examples of others doing more quicker...
I realized my body was doing very well and healing and adjusting and I often took this as an "ok, then get with rehabbing " and pushed it right when I needed to let things just be good for a bit.
Most new hippies do the same...
But having some patience, and letting it "Take the Time It Takes " is seriously underrated.

I took alot of gentle scolding, and thankfully I was still nervous enough about whether I actually did the right thing by replacing my bioligical hips, that I listened (mostly) and sure enough...
I am doing stupendous 6 years out and hope these are my Forever Hips!

Good Mojo coming at you!
 
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Charlie33

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@Mojo333 hahah. I suspect you’re pretty type A like me. When something breaks in ‘my world’ I analyze/fix/move on. X-ray to surgeon to table in 5 weeks. Fixed! Charles in charge! Back to 90% in 4 weeks….right?:heehee: appreciate the good mojo and more realistic view.

@Layla thanks. As always great counsel.

Good night all…
 

myglasshalffull

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Hi Charlie,
I agree that the "mental" part of recovery can be just as frustrating as the physical end.
I had my yearly physical yesterday, I have same primary doctor forever and I love her, she's no nonsense and straightforward.
EKG and all those fun tests and then asked me about how the hip was doing and I was showing her where I still get tightness. She takes her fist and goes up and down that area and says "you have tight IT band."
Very common and not difficult to resolve.
I was telling her how some days I still worry about falling again and getting hurt and maybe too cautious.
PTSD??? Who knows.
In any case I gained almost 10 pounds in a year, so annoyed but I had very busy job in a restaurant 4 days a week before I got hurt as well as walking close to 3 miles a day. Not eating really any different but the fact I'm not getting that exercise isn't good either.
I am doing all household chores and volunteering at dog kennel and walking a few of the calmer dogs but it doesn't add up to the amount of exercise I was doing/getting before.
Supposed to be a fairly nice day here today so walking shoes here I come.
Hang in there, we will all get to the finish line!
 

Layla

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Happy Two Month Anniversary, Charlie!
I hope you have a great week!
@Charlie33
 
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Charlie33

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Thanks @Layla!

Only this past week did I feel I was walking w/o the hitch in step. The new hip just felt more normal. walking post THR super important, but distance doesn’t matter until gait improves.

That said, have kinda hit a mental reset in recovery timeline. Why? Well, it seems biomechanics that have taken years to lose don’t seem to come back in just 9 weeks. :heehee: I keep reminding myself it’s not about getting back to the ‘old you’, it’s about becoming the best you can be going forward. @Layla Squiggly line chart soooo true. Every week trends better but Not a straight line.:swim:
 

Mojo333

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:wave: @Charlie33
At 9 weeks I wasn't the Old Me - as in just pre-surgery but I wasn't the Old Me as before hip issues...
That took about a full year but with steady improvements...which seems long but now that I am nearing 6 years out...Well worth the recovery time.
Back to my Old, Old Me!:happydance:
Only this past week did I feel I was walking w/o the hitch in step. The new hip just felt more normal. For what it’s worth: while walking post THR super important, distance doesn’t matter until gait improves.
Very important observation and is So True!
 

Layla

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I keep reminding myself it’s not about getting back to the ‘old you’, it’s about becoming the best you can be going forward.
I really love this, Charle, because in reality, our prosthetic hip will never match our natural hip, accepting this was important to me. Thankfully my surgeon's PA reminded me of this very early on into the recovery process

Great news on losing the hitch in your giddy-up. :wink:
If you feel yourself falling back into it, remember heel-toe, heel-toe. I did have to repeat that to myself many times as my gait seemed to fall back into the bad one that became all too familiar as my hip deteriorated.
You're doing great, Charlie! I hope you have a wonderful weekend!
 

lanstan

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@Charlie33 Thanks for reminding me of this. i am 6 months out and i can do everything I want to do. Back to my old routine of exercising. BUT my new hip doesnt feel the same as my old hip and maybe never will. It's hard to describe but a little weaker and have to take Tylenol or ibuprofen before bed some days. Feels great in the morning but achey before bed. I am glad I have this site to know it may take a year. But i am so happy you reminded me it may never feel the same as my right hip. Love your post!
 

Merrimay

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At my first post-op visit, my OS told me that one day I'd wake up to realize I'd "forgotten" about my new hip. Let's just say that at 3.5 months that's not happened yet. The implant isn't painful, and so far I've heard none of the "clicks" that some describe, and my new hip does what I ask without complaining. But it does feel "different," less natural, and my brain knows it's there: a stranger that's broken into house and needs very careful watching.
 

myglasshalffull

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Merrimay,
I had to laugh when you said "stranger broke into the house" Isn't that the truth.
I keep waiting to wake up and not take my first step and not think about hip but hasn't happened yet.
I go about my day but it's always in back of my mind.
Maybe we need to be hypnotized?!?! LOL!
 

Eman85

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At my first post-op visit, my OS told me that one day I'd wake up to realize I'd "forgotten" about my new hip. Let's just say that at 3.5 months that's not happened yet. The implant isn't painful, and so far I've heard none of the "clicks" that some describe, and my new hip does what I ask without complaining. But it does feel "different," less natural, and my brain knows it's there: a stranger that's broken into house and needs very careful watching.
I never "forget" about my new hips.
 
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Charlie33

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Hi! Ok maybe late in game for this question but here goes:

I was moving my operated leg non weight bearing into a stretch I’ve done a bunch and felt a brief sharp pain directly underneath scar (mini posterior) as I was moving leg, not the stretch itself…. Not sure why but area seems aggravated. Doubt anything serious but first time post op this has happened. Walking ok but stairs can feel it. Tissue underneath feels tight and like rope.

I know R.I.C.E. , take it easy the answer…but wondering if scar tissue breaking up could cause this or anyone has had this happen 9+ weeks post op.

Thanks
 
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8 weeks post op, I can’t imagine not thinking about my hip. Every movement is slow and considered. Neurotic about dislocation for a start.
 

Merrimay

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@Charlie33 , I still get zaps and twinges under my scar at almost 4 months. I never like it, but for me it's part of recovery, it seems. Since your zap was triggered by a specific activity, would you be comfortable calling your OS's post-op nurse with your concerns?

Sometimes they can reassure you it's "normal" over the phone. Other times they'll want to be safe and check things out in person.

Sure hope it solves itself soon!
 

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