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HipsDon'tLie

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I am bone-on-bone in the right hip. Not to be outdone, the left is not far behind.
 

Mojo333

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Hi @HipsDon'tLie
Welcome to the forum.
I got the diagnosis of bone on bone for both hips over 3 1/2 years ago, had bilateral hip replacements May 2017, and am back to a healthy happy life.:happydance:
Do you have a surgery date yet?
I know it's unsettling but I am really happy to get my life back and rid myself of that miserable pain that was making my world smaller and sleep non-existent.

l'll give you the pre-op reading for people having their hips replaced.

If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic hip?
Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced hip, take a look at the posts and threads from other BoneSmarties provided in this link:
Stories of amazing hip recoveries
 

Going4fun

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Welcome ... Yep, I was bone on bone with the left ... got it replaced ... not there yet on the right, but that train will arrive some day.
 

Woodstockhip

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Yup, me too! When we first looked at the xray, the doctor said something like, “Well, see this? That's a bone spur, and that's a bird beak, and that's where the cartilage should be, and see there? The bone is worn out and ... that's your GOOD hip.” So, we opted for the bad hip, and who knows, maybe the other one will hold out for awhile. At least we will know what to expect.
 
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HipsDon'tLie

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Awww thanks for the replies. I truly appreciate your support. My surgery date is November 9. It was a cancellation and when it was offered I took it immediately. I figured, set the date now and have an anxiety attack later. For me I think the first hurdle in all of this--beyond the surgery, the risk, the recovery, the unknown--is the shock of it all. Wasn't I just playing singles tennis and walking every day, and the only surgery I dreamed about was the plastic kind. How did I get here? Who am I?
 

Mojo333

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I got a long awaited diagnosis for my low back pain and sciatica after 18 months of doctor visits and extensive imaging, which showed no back problems.
When I finally found out that my hips were both "done", at OS appointment...my surgery was set for less than 3 weeks.:flabber:
I agreed, as you relayed, figured I'd panic later.
On the one hand, I was completely shocked but also I was excited to get answers to my complaints and though I was still working full-time and soldiering on, I had a terrible limp and no sleeping position allowed me good rest.
You should do well with recovery since you are healthy and active.
The patience muscle will be the one thing that will help most early days.
You might also want to keep your upper body strong... This helped me tremendously for getting myself up and down without alot if assistance.
 
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HipsDon'tLie

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It is like the proverbial frog in hot water isn't it? You keep going even though you're suffering. Great advice about building upper body strength because I know I've been doing the furniture walk...leaning on everything and anything in my path. As a result, I have had a multitude of soft-tissue injuries to my hands, fingers, wrists, elbows with tingling and numbness and arm and shoulder pain. No wonder. I'm putting my body weigh on unconditioned body parts.
 

Pumpkln

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@HipsDon'tLie
Since you are cruising around using furniture and whatever is available, why don't you ask to see PT. You will receive gait training, fitting for an assistive device, and some simple exercises you can do safely before surgery, should be no more that 1 to 3 visits.
That way your arms will not be so sore, numb, and tingling when your surgery date arrives in a few weeks.
You will also be better prepared for when they get you up to walk ASAP after surgery.
 

Eman85

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You've made the decision so the hard part of pre-op is over. Now you can read all of the guidelines and suggestions on this board to be prepared for post-op.
 

Celle

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Now you can read all of the guidelines and suggestions on this board to be prepared for post-op.
And here is a sneak preview of our recovery guidelines:
Hip Recovery: The Guidelines
1. Don’t worry: Your body will heal all by itself. Relax, let it, don't try and hurry it, don’t worry about any symptoms now, they are almost certainly temporary
2. Control discomfort:
rest
ice
take your pain meds by prescription schedule (not when pain starts!)​

3. Do what you want to do BUT
a. If it hurts, don't do it and don't allow anyone - especially a physical therapist - to do it to you​
b. If your leg swells more or gets stiffer in the 24 hours after doing it, don't do it again.​

4. PT or exercise can be useful BUT take note of these

5. Try to follow this

6. Access these pages on the website


Pain management and the pain chart
Healing: how long does it take?
Chart representation of THR recovery

Dislocation risk and 90 degree rule
Energy drain for THRs
Pain and swelling control: elevation is the key
Post op blues is a reality - be prepared for it
Myth busting: on getting addicted to pain meds
Sleep deprivation is pretty much inevitable - but what causes it?

BIG TIP: Hips actually don't need any exercise to get better. They do a pretty good job of it all on their own if given half a chance. Trouble is, people don't give them a chance and end up with all sorts of aches and pains and sore spots. All they need is the best therapy which is walking and even then not to excess.

We try to keep the forum a positive and safe place for our members to talk about their questions or concerns and to report successes with their joint replacement surgery.

While members may create as many threads as they like in the majority of BoneSmart’s forums, we ask that each member have only One Recovery Thread. This policy makes it easier to go back and review the member’s history before providing advice, so please post any updates or questions you have right here in this thread.
 

JAS

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My left hip was bone on bone when I had my first minimally invasive posterior THR in May 2017. The right also showed changes at that time and the consultant said to me "don't leave it too long". I have been getting pain in the groin for a while now and this restricts my walking with the dog and the grandkids so I will be getting my right hip done in three days from now. I found everything really easy with the last one but I am now three years older (nearly 72) and am a bit worried that I have very high expectations this time and might be in for a bit of a shock!
 

Ozinthedesert

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Wasn't I just playing singles tennis and walking every day, and the only surgery I dreamed about was the plastic kind. How did I get here? Who am I?
I was bone on bone in my right hip. I ran a marathon in January and now here I sit one month post op from a THR. The diagnosis in June came at a huge shock and many tears were shed. And while I am still in recovery, I am confident I made the right decision. The arthritis pain was gone the second I woke up from the surgery!
 
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HipsDon'tLie

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It is such a shock! I'm still processing it and trying to decipher the meaning of it all. Should everyone be screened for hip and knee arthritis? Should we get baseline imaging done so we can keep track of changes? Should there be a public service campaign about what to look for and the importance of not ignoring any aches and pains you would ordinarily chalk up to aging? Do joints need better awareness?

I suppose the good news is that these surgeries are possible today and that arthritis in and of itself isn't a life-threatening condition. And maybe best of all is knowing there are others out there experiencing this too and are willing to share and connect so no one feels as alone in this.
 

Mojo333

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I agree with your sentiments about joint awareness and BEST of all, there is a cure to bone crunching hip pain.
At age 53, with endstage osteoarthritis...unending pain and sleep deprivation...I underwent a truly life salvaging surgery called total hip replacement.
It has saved my health, my job, and my sanity.
Yes, I was anxious....Scared.
But the prospect of a great healthy life inspired me to stay positive and try to keep the what ifs to a minimum regarding the time they took up in my brain pre-op.
Of course I would have preferred not to have had to HAVE this done.
However...
Love my new hips....:egypdance:
 

Woodstockhip

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It’s so hard not to think of my grandma who I loved dearly. She had terrible arthritis and there was nothing to be done for her back in those days. My mother, too — she would have so benefited from a knee replacement. As scary as it feels to know we have to have surgery, and as lousy those first few weeks are, I think we are all incredibly grateful at the amazing repairs we can have done to our bodies.
 
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HipsDon'tLie

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Question for the group.

This all started with my right hip--intermittent pain gradually worsening to sharp pain when bearing weight as well as groin, thigh, and knee pain while resting. This is my bone-on-bone hip scheduled for replacement on November 9.

The left hip started to become painful over the past several months (on x-ray not quite as bad as the right hip) worsening so that it has now surpassed the right hip in pain and difficulty. Going from a standing position to a sitting position, from a sitting to standing position, any bending at all at the waist--no matter how slight--causes my hip to lock such that any movement to straighten my leg is excruciating. The pain resolves within minutes, but sometimes it takes a little longer. It actually makes me cry. This also happens while lying in bed attempting to sleep.

So after several discussions with nurses and surgical coordinators--I keep missing my surgeon's calls to address the basic question as to whether I should be having the left hip done first since it's become so painful--an associate of the practice called last night because my surgeon has gone out of town.
He basically reassured me that he would still recommend doing the right hip first and then the left.

My question is, has anyone experienced this? If the nonsurgical hip is more bothersome than the surgical hip--regardless of what the xrays say--won't recovery be difficult? Or will the surgical hip be so much better that I'll be able to rely on that one until I can have the left replaced? Does any of this make sense? I may not be articulating this clearly because I can't seem to get a satisfactory answer from my care team.

I'm planning on still talking with my surgeon when he returns, but any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
 

Jaycey

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f the nonsurgical hip is more bothersome than the surgical hip--regardless of what the xrays say--won't recovery be difficult?
Not more difficult - just longer. You may need to use a cane or crutch for a longer period to keep the weight off the non-op side.

Have you discussed bilateral replacements with your surgeon? One op and one recovery.
 
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HipsDon'tLie

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Jaycey,
Do you mean having the next THR performed while the other is healing from surgery?
 

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