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Awaiting RTHR 23/2

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by Delphi, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Hi everyone.
    Having spent the last few weeks reading people's comments here , thought I would introduce myself. I am 58 and have had intermittent hip problems for the last 3 years. I was told during last summer that I would require THR due to labral tears and advanced OA but was so shocked that I could not contemplate the op then.

    After a second opinion confirming this, I have reluctantly accepted that I need to do this to get my life back. Sensing my doubt, my consultant told me that if he showed my x-ray to 20 Orthopaedic surgeons they would all expect to replace the joint immediately. My initial thought was, well yes, but that's what you do for a living! However, common sense has prevailed, and despite my abject terror at the prospect of every aspect of the op and recovery, I have bitten the bullet.

    My hope now is that I can get through this with minimal trauma and pain, and with a successful outcome, so that I and my husband can start living our lives properly again .

    Roll on Summer!
     
  2. Jaycey

    Jaycey Moderator

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    @Delphi Welcome to BoneSmart and well done on moving ahead with your op. We were all in that very scared space after diagnosis. The good news is you will indeed get your life back post THR!

    Keep reading and posting here. It does help ease the pre-op nerves.
     
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  3. Cas

    Cas Senior

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    @Delphi Hi and bless you. Yes it all seems daunting and scary but it will be ok. The op isn't as bad as you imagine - I know !!!! but in no time at all I was back home with an ice pack and a recliner. Try not to worry - read all the mantras and just keep thinking how much better you will feel in a few weeks time. Any worries just ask and someone will be able to help you as we have all been there. Lots of luck.
     
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  4. leejaa

    leejaa Post-Grad

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    As you are reading here, you will see that we were all nervous to various degrees but all pretty much very happy to reach recovery and the road to full mobility and no pain. Have faith, this is a very common procedure these days (I know it is still scary and special when it is about us) and the staff and surgeons are very well trained and used to doing the surgery.
     
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  5. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Oh scared and surgery go hand in hand, trust us!

    Have you got a date yet? Which hospital and surgeon are you going to?
     
  6. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Thank you @Jaycey , @Cas and @leejaa for your responses and kind wishes. I have been a basket case worrying about this but am feeling a little calmer today. You'll think I'm nuts , but I watched the Supervet programme last night which featured Noel, the Vet, performing hip replacement surgery on a border collie. They soft focussed the gruesome bits but it was strangely reassuring to see the dog's recovery . If I am skipping about as he was after three months, I will be delighted!
     
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  7. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    I watched that - but they fuzzed out the operation site! I was so cross! (As if I haven't seen enough hip replacements in my life already!!) That vet is amazing, isn't he?

    One word of warning though - do NOT expect to recover as quickly as that dog did! Animals and humans are quite different in their concept of pain and stuff!
     
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  8. Miss Muffet

    Miss Muffet Forum Advisor

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    I'd love to say don't panic - but then I did. But to be honest it was because I feared what I didn't fully understand I was letting myself in for. Truth to tell it was SO much better than I imagined and by the time my second one came around - 5 months after the first - I felt on top of things. You've got a 'getting worse pain' now and you'll swap that for a 'getting better pain' - actually I felt discomfort (sort of a bit brused and swollen) pain management is very good nowadays and you just need to keep your nurses in touch with how you feel. I was asked regularly to mark my pain level 0-10 (0 being none and 10 being OMG) Well the day of my surgery, before I went in, it was 9-10 and when I came to after my spinal/sedation it was ZERO. Like magic. The minute I felt a tinge of pain I spoke up - that's imporant because they can deal with it - and you'll be sent home with things under control. It's just frustrating being a bit disabled for a while, asking for help and swearing at crutches (!) but we'll all hold your hand. Last year was a bit of rightoff for me and hubby because of 2 Ops but this year we've kicked off with all sorts of outings, plans and holidays - so life does get better!
     
  9. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Oh, Josephine,please don't spoil my illusion!!! Reality will no doubt hit me soon enough! Yes, the Vet is incredible. He is so dedicated and gifted but I particularly love the way he combines his skill with imaginative solutions and precision engineering ,along with such evident love and affection for his patients. Addictive viewing!
    My op is next wk, 23/2 at Wrightington. Thanks for your support.
     
  10. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Thanks @Miss Muffet for taking the time to send me reassurance. I am trying not to think about it too much but failing miserably! I guess it's a balance of educating myself so I know what to expect without becoming obsessive about it. I can try... just hoping that the result enables me to get back to an active life-style and not have to rely on my husband so much for help. I am sure he will be thinking that too!
     
  11. Miss Muffet

    Miss Muffet Forum Advisor

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    Good. You won't regret it. Have you got all your survival kit lined up?
    Read my postOp thread (below in my signature) scan through the my long and detailed account of the day itself (and subsequent days) I was a bit of a fruitcake before surgery but just read how I fared. Think about what you're actually worried about and ask anything you want. You're part of a great big friendly club now.
     
  12. JenJuniper

    JenJuniper Junior Member

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    I laughed at your SUpervet story @Delphi.
    I had the stupidity to watch an old episode of '24 hours in A and E' the night after my op, which featured the lady that dislocated her hip replacement!
    The nurses and I did have a good laugh! (About my stupidity, not the lady!)

    Totally agree with @Miss Muffet... fear of what you don't understand or know , and the op was better and easier than expected!


    Sent from my iPhone using BoneSmart Forum
     
  13. leejaa

    leejaa Post-Grad

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    Yes, your husband will appreciate your recovery also. My husband already says I am more like my old self and that is only 3wks out from surgery with the other pain gone. He is already getting excited about us being able to go for walks/hikes again in the spring. Of course he is also looking forward not having to do all the grocery shopping and other household chores (could not handle the walking pre op and have not done any yet - do not want to push).
     
  14. Miss Muffet

    Miss Muffet Forum Advisor

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    I watched that too @JenJuniper. The x-ray made me wince. I didn't watch any YouTubes about surgery before my Op. I figured that was my surgeon's domain so why did I need to know! I decided I'd get myself into good shape beforehand and then after he'd done his job I'd just follow the BS advice.
     
  15. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Yes, think I have organised most of the equipment I will need, apart from a shower stool. Is that really necessary do you think? I have a walk-in shower so was thinking I would be able to use a spare toilet raiser frame if necessary (unused I hasten to add).

    One of the reasons for my anxiety is that several years ago I had an accident in Greece and broke my ankle and leg. I was very stressed out as the team did not speak much English and without discussion, I was given a spinal or epidural, not sure which, and sedation. Unfortunately, I woke up during surgery and thought I would have a heart attack because I was so panic stricken and nobody seemed to do anything for what seemed like ages. Eventually, I was sedated again, but I am really scared of this happening again. As a consequence of this accident, I have metal work in my leg and ankle which is still sensitive to touch even now. I am worried that the manipulation of my leg will cause greater problems and pain and swelling than normal. Trying not to dwell on that, but it took me about 18 months to walk properly again, even with physio every week. So...just hoping that in trying to solve one problem with my hip, I don't cause myself another with my leg and foot.

    Has anyone had this experience and if so, what was the outcome? Also just wondering if @Josephine can give me her opinion please?

    Thanks very much to everyone.
     
  16. Miss Muffet

    Miss Muffet Forum Advisor

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    I bought a shower stool from the mobility shop and found it really useful. I was a bit nervous that I might feel wobbly or slip (I also got a really decent shower mat) I had help from hubby getting in and out of the shower (we have a high step into it) but once I got my confidence back was fine.

    So sorry you had a bad experience in Greece with the spinal - if you've read my postOp thread you'll see that I was very specific in my pre surgery chat with my anaesthetist about not waking, not wanting to see/hear/smell anything or even seeing the operating theatre. On both occasions everything went smoothly and according to my wishes. It is very important that you are your own advocate as he/she will then understand any anxieties and work with you for the best result. They know we're nervous and really do want us to feel as relaxed as possible. I will leave Josephine to respond about your concerns, but your surgeon is presumably aware of your previous operation and I assume will have shown up on your x-Rays.
     
  17. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Why the 'unused' comment? :scratch:

    I also have a walk-in shower and got a stool like this from Amazon

    shower stool_.jpg
    More likely a spinal but it hardly matters. If you're interested you can see the difference here Anaesthetics - spinals, femoral blocks, GAs and everything else
    What a horrid experience! I would certainly tell the anaesthetist about this experience so he knows to keep a close eye on you.The last thing we want is to have patients on the edge of a panic attack!
    One thing that occurs to me is that you could do with having that metal removed if it's so sensitive because it shouldn't be. But it would be unusual for the surgeon to grip your leg that far down. It's more often around the knee it's held. However, I would also suggest you tell the surgeon about this sensitivity too so he can bear it in mind during the operation.
     
  18. Delphi

    Delphi Member

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    Thank you so much @Josephine and @Miss Muffet for your advice and kind reassurances. I am very grateful for your help.
     
  19. Jaycey

    Jaycey Moderator

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    I don't mention this very often as I don't want members to think it's the norm but I had the same experience during my LTHR. I woke up and actually spoke to the anaesthetist. I asked if I could have more sedation and he said any more would kill me. I shut my eyes and fought off the panic attack - eventually fell asleep again.

    Just like you I had a major concern about going through this again when I had my RTHR. But I had a long talk with the anaesthetist about it. He said it does happen but it is fairy rare. And he promised to do everything he could to keep me "under" through the whole procedure. I was SO happy when I woke up as I was already being wheeled into recovery. Have a good discussion with the anaesthetist on the day. They totally understand your concern.

    The same is true for your pain issues with your leg. Discuss this concern with your surgeon. I assume the accident and surgery is a part of your medical record? But have the discussion anyway.
     
  20. Josephine

    Josephine NURSE DIRECTOR, BONESMART Administrator

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    Oh what an idiot! That drug is very short acting and generally they have to give top-ups several times during the procedure. Which is how come people sometimes (rarely) actually wake up and become aware. A good anaesthetist should be observing the patient for signs of waking such as moving head or arms. The pulse and respirations rates also give cues. And ever before that, he should know when he gave the drug and approximately when the top-up is due. However, in the years of my career I've seen it happen only in a very small handful of cases.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017

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