THR Anterior patients, I am questioning posterior pain. Dislocation?

I have had people pick up groceries ordered with Instacart. They also deliver. This makes my life easier at the moment. My niece uses this as a time saver- she does a wonderful job with self care.
 
1 week away from my final appointment with my surgeon at 6 weeks out! :yikes:

I'm wondering, does anyone have any good questions I should ask the surgeon I might not be thinking about as preparation for my future without him?

I'm unlikely to go back to the practice to get consults from the other surgeons as I plan to have a new job (and consequently new insurance) around the time I'm at the 3 month mark.

Edit: The biggest thing I'm dealing with these days is fatigue. I hope it's just recovery and not my baseline these days. I feel like I could flop down for a nap almost any time of the day.
 
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The biggest thing I'm dealing with these days is fatigue. I hope it's just recovery and not my baseline these days. I feel like I could flop down for a nap almost any time of the day
Good old energy drain....you're certainly not alone in experiencing the fatigue.
Our body's energy supply isn't limitless. So when we're in healing mode after major surgery
our energy will be used for healing first, not leaving a great reserve for all the other activity of daily life. It is completely normal to feel tired for quite some time. How long....most likely relates to your body's rate of healing. Making our best effort to get adequate sleep and rest is beneficial. Our body does it's best healing while we're sleeping.

Questions you may want to ask. the surgeon at your post op visit -
Ask what you should NOT do? Ask him to list any precautions he wants you to follow and the length of time.
Ask when you can safely return to activities (specify them) that you normally engaged in pre-op
When can you return to the dentist and does your surgeon advise taking antibiotics before dental procedures.
If so, for how long? Months, Years, Lifelong
How often should you return for follow up visits.
When can you leave your parents house for home.
When you can drive.
When can you go back to work.
Ask for copies of your medical records from the office calls to the surgical notes for your personal files.

Hope this helps. I am sure others will have ideas for you also.
Have a good week!
 
Thanks as always @Layla.

Question for anyone reading: as far as walking and the recovery of the hip goes, am I missing out on a benefit of healing if I don't go out of my way to do extra walking?

That's poorly phrased, but my dad is pushing me to just walk around the neighborhood doing nothing because I "need" to walk. I'm having no problem doing it when necessary, I'm walking very comfortably. I just don't want to waste my time going out and walking in circles.

Am I holding back or impeding my recovery if I don't set aside a specific amount of time to walk? I know walking is good for me in general, but I want to know how it works specifically as it pertains to hip replacement recovery.

My dad used to just put me in the front yard and lock the door on me as a kid, because being outside was good for me, lol. That's what this feels like.
 
Sorry but this made me chuckle. Walk if you want. It should help. Using your hip as much as tolerating will help your healing. No rush though if you don't want to.
 
@Solar7 Walking really is the best exercise for new hips! It strengthens your muscles, helps you develop a smooth regular gait, increases your stamina, and gets fresh air into your lungs! It's sad that you equate getting out side with being shut out by your Dad! Is there a store near by you could walk to so you have a goal? Like to get a donut or a coffee or other treat?
 
my dad is pushing me to just walk around the neighborhood doing nothing because I "need" to walk.
I will agree with dad on this one. At this point, you can be out walking for 30 minutes a day and even more if you feel up to it. With that said, I'm not suggesting you go out tomorrow and walk for 30 minutes since you haven't been walking, but I think you should start with a ten - fifteen minutes (total) walk meaning 5 or 10 minutes in one direction, then turn around and go back. Consider doing this daily to increase strength and stamina. Slowly increase time and distance. Some use houses or mailboxes as goals, one house or one mailbox further each day. Happy walking!:walking:
 
Sorry, but your dad is right!
just don't want to waste my time going out and walking in circles.
You won't be wasting your time; you will be strengthening your new hip and all of the soft tissue that was upset during the surgery.

My surgeon told me that my physical therapy post THR was to walk for one (continuous) mile every day. Of course, I couldn't do it at the beginning! As Layla suggests, build up slowly. I think you'll be surprised at the difference it makes.
 
@Solar7 Walking really is the best exercise for new hips! It strengthens your muscles, helps you develop a smooth regular gait, increases your stamina, and gets fresh air into your lungs! It's sad that you equate getting out side with being shut out by your Dad! Is there a store near by you could walk to so you have a goal? Like to get a donut or a coffee or other treat?
Unfortunately, no, there's nothing in walking distance from my parents' house or my house besides more homes. (As I think I've said before, thanks American Southwest!)

I wonder if I'm doing a bad job of explaining that I'm not having a hard time when I get up and walking, I feel very capable. To @Layla's point, I can't imagine having any difficulty walking 30 minutes (while doing something) right now. I'm biking at a fast pace (100 RPM+ for 15+ minutes) at PT, doing leg presses/other weight, balancing on the surgical leg unassisted... lots of stuff. I'd say that I functionally feel "normal."

I guess the problem is that I almost feel like you could set any reasonable goal and I could accomplish it, but then it becomes less about recovery and more about just "training," as has been mentioned here when it comes to not letting PT push you too hard. I'll double check with the surgeon again on Tuesday. @benne68 mentioned walking for a continuous mile every day... that seems like a lot! There wasn't ever a reason to walk a continuous mile when I was 100% healthy.

(Another post to come, but appreciate the advice around this!)
 
Navigating a little bit of family politics, I finally came home tonight. It's really wonderful to be able to stand and get around my house for the first time in nearly two years. If anyone's reading this and wondering if they should get the surgery at a younger age, my experience has been nice.

I'm so lucky this worked out well.

Next step: better computer chair! Or a Brazilian Butt Lift so I get some more cushion back there.
 
Question for those with the anterior regarding numbness... I've had a numb spot to the left of my incision, that was expected and was fine.

But now I'm concerned. Since I've gotten home I'm suddenly getting complete and total numbness in my thigh in spells, sometimes even including the knee. It's been returning, but the numbness spells are getting longer and longer. Now, I'm using stairs more than ever and I've been sitting in the computer chair a lot since I've been back, so there's a definite change in what I'm doing, but this does have me concerned there's a blood flow issue or something.

I see my surgeon on Tuesday so of course I'll ask, but if anyone here happens to have any insight that'd be appreciated!
 
I would try not to worry as our bodies go through so much before, during and after these surgeries. Glad you are seeing your surgeon on Tuesday to put your mind at ease.
 
Just continuing positive storytelling here...

I went out with my friends today. I've mentioned Dungeons and Dragons, but it's not really my thing. Still, it was great to drive, bring drinks, bring food, and feel normal! I got there and home all by myself.

When I got home, I pulled the trash cans in without issue. I'm so mobile, and it's wonderful.
 
Final appointment today. Everything looks good, my fears about my numbness and minor knee pain were allayed.

Kinda the the close to a weird chapter of my life, in a sense.

We discussed my activity levels and he said I could actually stand to take it a little easier for the bone to continue growing into the implant, which is funny because I've been beating myself up about not walking enough.

I'll stick around on the forum to encourage other people leading up to the surgery and in recovery, but I'll probably let this thread rest on the more frequent updates. Thanks to everyone who followed along, offered advice, and for all of your support. Wonderful community you've built here, and I'm gracious to have been a part of it.
 
Okay, maybe I got ahead of myself saying I would give the thread a rest, lol.

Are there any best practices for figuring out when you've overdone it and need to rest vs. not doing enough?

Since I've moved home I've been dealing with a bit more pain. But I'd say the pain generally isn't in the hip area, it's either the whole leg or the knee, and it's worst when I'm sleeping. I had an MRI of the knee before surgery, so I know there's no damage there.

I'm doing different things at home, but I wouldn't say a lot. I did have a bad grocery shop last night (no carts available, uncharacteristically rude staff who told me I could go hunt for one in the parking lot), and had to carry everything myself... but generally I've been keeping it very low key.

I'm at my wits end trying to figure out how to beat this leg pain at night. For a few hours a pillow between the knees can help. The next night? The pillow is the problem. Lol.
 
My experience with my other hip was challenging during month three to five or so. Feels like you are healed but your body is still recovering. As we ramp up activity and get back to work, our bodies have a lot to handle. Elevate, rest and ice when you have a chance. A tough night's sleep here and there may happen. Hang in there!
 
I guess the problem is that I almost feel like you could set any reasonable goal and I could accomplish it, but then it becomes less about recovery and more about just "training," as has been mentioned here when it comes to not letting PT push you too hard. I'll double check with the surgeon again on Tuesday. @benne68 mentioned walking for a continuous mile every day... that seems like a lot! There wasn't ever a reason to walk a continuous mile when I was 100% healthy.
Hips aside, there is a good amount of research showing correlations between higher step counts and decreased mortality (basically, it'll help you live longer). Either 30 mins or a mile every day actually isn't much moment/walking, but it will have long term health benefits, especially as you age.

The key is, to first build up to it, and then if you're still recovery from your surgery/feeling sore, make sure you ice and elevate to recover afterward.
 
Slow and steady wins the race! Not that you’re racing!

You’re still, what, about 8 weeks in? Stuff is probably still healing and sorting itself out, as everyone says rest, ice, listen to your body and ramp up to new things slowly.

If it hurts, go back to “get it healed” mode before you get too excited about “training”.

For me the transition btw PT - just getting all the pieces healed and back together - and actually “training” to get stronger again - was about 6 months out. So it’s early times still and there’s lots of recovery left ahead. Everyone’s different of course! You’ll get there.
 

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