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Anterior Approach -- 2 weeks recovery?!?!

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by Mersada, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. Mersada

    Mersada member
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    Has anyone returned to work after 8 weeks? One doc told me if I can use a cane I can go back to my desk job after 8 weeks. I have a second opinion coming in a few weeks. I would imagine lunch lady has to wait longer due to the lifting, sounds like a demanding job. Good luck with recovery, though.
     
  2. Mersada

    Mersada member
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    I was continuing my research and found the director of NYU hip center claiming 2 weeks recovery before walking with no aids. Is this possible? He does anterior approach. If that is the case why isn't everyone doing the anterior approach? I am hoping I am a candidate for this. I am also hoping he takes my insurance. I will call in a few hours when they are open. Any thoughts on this?

    This surgeon I found has been featured on quite a few news programs.
    I feel excited if this is true.
     
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  3. anny

    anny graduate

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    I would think that recovery from the operation would depend more on the skill of the surgeon and the health of the patient more than the approach. I have heard that initially the anterior might be a bit quicker, but by about 2 mths everyone is about equal, however it was done. You also have to take into account the slightly different possible side effects of the anterior, such as nerve damage. Whichever approach you end up with, it's really important that your surgeon is very experienced in doing it, so be sure to check his credentials as well as the news reports
     
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  4. Mersada

    Mersada member
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    I would imagine he is the best if he is the director. I already have scars in the front of my hip due to childhood surgery for dysplasia...so I am hoping I am a candidate for this. I am going to attempt to make an appointment with him today. if he says 2 weeks....I will be thrilled.
     
  5. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I had double hip replacement via anterior minimally invasive surgery.
    I COULD'VE walked without aids..but my legs were injured AND they needed support and time to heal.
    Short term recovery can be much faster...long term recovery will be the same as they are implanting a prosthetic hip.
    I am wary of a surgeon who would encourage someone who had hip replacement to rush recovery. I don't plan on having this done again and wanted to give it time to get well. I went back to my job on a limited basis in 5 weeks...still too early, but for financial and other reasons, felt it was necessary.
    It wasn't without consequences and even the energy drain aspect made it VERY difficult.
    Just because we CAN, doesn't mean we SHOULD!
     
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  6. Layla

    Layla FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    It is definitely possible but I wouldn't count on it. You don't want to rush Recovery.
    At your age there is a possibility you could have your prosthetic for life. It would be worth it to take
    it slow, letting all settle into place as it should. Dislocation is supposedly extremely painful.
    And you hit the nail on the head with "if that is the case, why isn't everyone doing the anterior approach."
    Good question. Not berating the anterior approach at all but it's no guarantee to a two week recovery.
    It takes a full year for your injured leg to heal. Your flesh will be cut, bone removed, power tools are used.

    I agree with (anny) on surgeon skill coupled with your general health and recovery practices.
    And Mojo is correct in "just because you can, doesn't mean you should" I'm willing to bet that the OS you reference doesn't have any special magic tricks allowing you to heal more quickly over any other patient throughout the country having surgery the same day as you. Do your research. Find out how many surgeries he does annually. I'm not trying to discourage you from using him but beware of those promising you more than all the others.
    Wishing you the best in your search....stay in touch.
    @Mersada
     
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  7. jaydub63

    jaydub63 graduate

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    Your recovery is going to be your recovery, regardless of the surgeon's predictions of timeframe. I chose a mini-posterior over the anterior and was walking without aids at 2.5 weeks. Like Anny said, much depends on your overall health and physical condition going into the surgery and the skill of the surgeon, rather than the approach. I think a lot of people set themselves up with unrealistic expectations of how fast they should recover based on some unusually quick recoveries of other people.
     
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  8. Gypsy

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    I returned to work at 8 weeks. I have a desk job and am fortunate in that I can telework 4 days a week. Going in to the office the first week (with a cane) was tiring, mainly because of the 1.5-hour commute, but that was less noticable the second week. Just have to remember to get up and move around during the day.
     
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  9. Eman85

    Eman85 post-grad

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    I didn't tell my surgeon what approach he should use. I asked what approach and why he used it, convinced me. Mine is posterior, worked for me.
     
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  10. Gypsy

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    Much of this depends on the surgeon's preference and level of experience. Regardless of where the surgeon makes the incision, a total hip replacement is a major surgery.

    Sometimes, surgeons might help set up these expectations! Before I had my first THR at the relatively tender age of 34, my surgeon told me he had a 98-year-old patient that was doing great with a new hip. I did not find that to be helpful, as I struggled through recovery.
     
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  11. Bone-obo

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    I love my surgeon dearly - for what he's good at, which is surgery. Surgeon's like to quote the best cases like they're typical results, sometimes I think with the best of intentions (reassurance?) without the sensitivity to understand that the unrealistic expectations they set up hurt us in the long run. The sad thing is that most patients don't have the support as they go thru this, leaving them/us to blame themselves for "slow" healing which isn't actually slow at all.

    The advice I found was to let the surgeon pick what was most comfortable for him, just like @Eman85. Seemed to work for me, too!
     
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  12. jaydub63

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    @Bone-obo that is so true! I was discussing eventually returning to running with my surgeon (which he supports) and he started telling me about this guy who is an ultra-marathoner who had THR. I was like, geez, I just want to do a few slow laps of my neighborhood and maybe a 5K eventually!
     
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  13. PolarBear60

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    People have returned to work earlier than the recommended 12 weeks phased return to work, but they are usually quite miserable for having done so. I recognize there are many reasons people choose to do this -- usually a strong need for an income stream of some sort.

    In addition to the physical challenges and probably pain associated with going back to work so early, there's possibly the more serious brain fog issue some people experience. If you have a job where numbers have to be accurate or where safety of any kind is a consideration, be aware that you may not be fully aware of the extent the post-surgical brain fog is affecting you and your thought patterns.

    If the thinking processes are okay -- mine weren't after my first replacement, but I didn't notice any trouble after my second (different sedation methods, I think), your next concern is to minimize the stress on your new hip. Bring your cane or other walking aids at least until you have had a chance to see how you adjust to going back to work. Have a place you can rest and elevate your leg whenever possible. Hopefully, you have a place where you can keep several ice packs in a freezer to apply ice during lunch or breaks. Remember that the process of getting ready for work and commuting takes more energy than you've probably ever thought about.

    Consider stopping or delaying physical therapy if you've decided to participate in it, because your new hip will be getting plenty of work during your early return to work. It won't need much more activity.

    Expect to not be able to do anything once you get home after work than put your leg up and ice to try to recover as much as possible before you do it all over again the next day. Keep as positive an attitude as possible, but understand if you return to work before the recommended phased 12 weeks time, you're likely to have to trade off other aspects of your life, and you're likely to extend your recovery time.

    People do this and survive. They aren't necessarily happy during that time. Best of luck to you.
     
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  14. Mersada

    Mersada member
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    Thanks for all your input. I am still researching and this particular doctor doesn't take my insurance, but I am still hoping for the anterior approach to be taken.

    I have my second opinion June 27th. i will discuss all these issues with the doctor.

    I just want to heal as soon as possible...financially, it's going to be difficult if I have to be out for 12 weeks...but, I guess my body will decide what it wants to do. Thank you all for your insight. Just hoping for the best outcome.
     
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  15. Mojo333

    Mojo333 FORUM ADVISOR Forum Advisor

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    I do understand about not needing extended time off from work.
    I had super results with my anterior surgery..so good short term that it was a little misleading on common issues like deep healing, energy drain, etc.
    You can do this.
    Just don't set your recovery time in stone.
    Hope you find someone you have ultimate confidence in.
    Sending good mojo your way.
     
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  16. sequin98

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    In Canada, there are a small number that do that approach, it is still quite new. I would have loved it, but hey, my OS was great!
     
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  17. Eman85

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    If you do some internet research you will find plenty of medical papers written on THR approach and the positives,negatives and reasons for the different approaches.
    I'd say at 8 weeks I could have gone to a desk job as long as I could get up and walk often. But by going to work it will most likely stop any PT or even long walks due to time.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
  18. Jamie

    Jamie ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    This is not a given! You want a surgeon who does lots of surgeries - the exact surgery you are having. "Directors" tend to be administrators or teachers and often are somewhat removed from the operating theater. Practice makes (and keeps) perfect. So, please look for a surgeon who is currently doing a lot of procedures and don't worry about whether or not he is the head of any department.
     
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  19. SurreyGirl

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    Interesting. My surgeon has done a lot of hip replacements and is concerned about the long term effects of Anterior. I have been at my job quite a while. I don’t want twelve weeks off work but this is far too important long term to screw up by coming back too quickly. I have ft pay for 6 months, have never taken much time off sick in my job but this time will resist pressure to come back early. If Young mothers can take a well deserved year off to bring up children the least I owe myself is time to recover from this having spent years covering for everyone else... I do intend to work from home once brain fog clears....
     
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  20. sequin98

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    Well put!!!
     
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