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THR 66F, R-THR, Anterior approach 4/23

shibbard

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Joined
Apr 16, 2024
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66
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Hi I'm new here, was sent from the subreddit TotalHipReplacement. Here's the beginning of my story -

My right hip has bothered me on and off for a few years, after a day on my feet or with a lot of walking, but always came back if I rested it for a few days. In early February this year, I had a strenuous weekend and it just didn't come back. I contacted a new orthopedic group and was seen by a PA on March 8 who ordered an MRI. Got that in about 10 days and results were not good. Because I wanted to try to save my summer, I decided to try an injection to see if I could get by without surgery although I was in continual pain, unable to do almost any normal life activities.

However, right before my injection was scheduled two weeks ago, the surgeon's office called and said there was a cancellation and I was the first person on their list due to my imaging and clinical exam. I had my first consult with the surgeon on 4/5 and we scheduled surgery for 4/23. I figured this opening must be a sign that I should just go forward with the surgery. So my total wait time from first visit to this orthopedics group to surgery was about 6 weeks. It's a large group which is part of a very good med school; my surgeon looks young (to me!) but has done over 1000 hips so I feel confident in his abilities.

it's been a bit of a rush getting all the Pre-Op things done but I can't wait. I ride horses (jumping) competitively, and keep/care for horses at home, as well as help my husband farm which is an active lifestyle (oh and work full time), and my hip situation has had a huge impact on all that. I just can't believe how quickly it went from just an annoyance to having major negative impact on every aspect of my life. I've been told I'll be restricted from riding for 5 months after surgery (I am conformationally at higher risk of dislocation so he wants all the soft tissue well healed). So that's a bummer but I'm not getting any younger. I'm in a good spot with my decision to go ahead and get this over with.

I feel incredibly lucky and blessed to have got a surgery date so soon. I have read so many comments about people waiting for months and years. I could not have dealt with this pain for that long without going crazy! I'm getting a little uptight about what recovery will be like, I have an image of myself as superwoman but that is not always well founded. So I am trying to tamp down expectations. I've read enough to know that it's a major deal, people vary a lot in their healing, and I may or may not be one of the lucky ones who breezes through recovery and healing. fingers crossed, though!
 
:welome:

Because your schedule came up so fast, I'm leaving a lot of info. These are all short articles. Please do ask us questions and share specific concerns!


If you are at the stage where you have joint pain but don't know for sure if you are ready to have surgery, these links may help:
Score Chart: How bad is my arthritic hip?
Choosing a surgeon and a prosthesis
BMI Calculator - What to do if your surgeon says you're too heavy for joint replacement surgery
Longevity of implants and revisions: How long will my new joint last?

If you are at the stage where you are planning to have surgery but are looking for information so you can be better prepared for what is to come, take a look at these links:
Recovery Aids: A comprehensive list for hospital and home
Recliner Chairs: Things you need to know if buying one for your recovery
Pre-Op Interviews: What's involved?

And if you want to picture what your life might be like with a replaced hip, take a look at stories of amazing hip recoveries.
 
@shibbard So glad you found us. I think sooner rather than later is not only a good sign but better for your mental health. Lol. You'll be much more busy because of the shortened pre-op time schedule than most of the rest of us were and have less time for the nervousness to work on you. The other great thing: you'll be recovering when the weather is warm and you can be outside.

Just FYI: that first week most likely will be rough. If you expect it, I think you will fair much better. Our recommendation here is to elevate and ice frequently with a cloth between your skin and the ice. These were my besties for the first few weeks. Take your pain meds on a regular schedule. You don't have to do much except walk a little bit every hour or so during the day (bathroom trips are pretty frequent those first couple of days and nights, so that kinda takes care of itself.) Get yourself a "nest" made up: a recliner or comfortable couch, etc. where you have your books, water, lip balm, remote control, etc, You'll be spending quite a bit of time there, so make it your own. Also don't be surprised if all those things you plan to do go by the wayside. That's normal because almost all of your energy will be going to healing your body. Have some very simple meals planned: from freezer to micro or oven are great. Soup and sandwiches work, too. You get the drift.

You will not be incapacitated! They will have you walking right after surgery and you will be cleared by PT before being discharged home. That being said, if you can, have someone there to help you at least that first couple of days. You can do it on your own but it takes more planning. You will be surprised at how much this surgery takes out of you those first couple of weeks or so. So a helpful caretaker is a Godsend.

Each week gets better. Then you can start to see how it was all worth it. The healing journey begins next Tuesday and we will be walking it with you. Let us know how else we can help. Blessings!
 
@shibbard Welcome to BoneSmart! You are very fortunate to be able to schedule your surgery so quickly! Many folks have to wait months from first visit to getting into an operating theater.

Many of our members here return to strenuous jobs and activities after hip replacement -- including some who get back on their horses without any problem. The main thing for you is going to be taking large dose of "Vitamin P" - patience! As your surgeon told you healing everything first is vitally important. Once healed then you can work at getting strength and stamina back. By your own report it took you several years to get to the point of seeking medical intervention ... and finding out the hip joint needs replacing. So it is going to take time to get all the muscles and tendons in the leg back to proper functioning. The hip itself does not need physical therapy - walking is the best exercise. But, if after your gait stabilizes and feels normal, you are having trouble with other motions - like getting that foot onto opposite knee - then PT may be needed.

Best of everything to you! And do ask any questions you may have - we do like to help!
 
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@shibbard I'll add that I was 64yo when I had both hip joints replaced. 6 months later I traveled to the East coast for a reunion and drove all over New England, danced, walked a lot, played with 3 energetic lab dogs, swam in the ocean, and rode a horse ... well, sort of, ummm not a real horse .... it was a carousel horse. Just letting you know that while getting older is not for sissies, it does not mean that one needs to give up fun and adventures.
 
@mendogal, thank you for the list of articles. I am a reader and these are all great info for me.

@Hip4life and @djklaugh thanks for the welcome and words of encouragement. I am so ready to get this over with, I wish it was tomorrow instead of next week.

What a great site this is!
 
@shibbard So glad you found us. I think sooner rather than later is not only a good sign but better for your mental health. Lol. You'll be much more busy because of the shortened pre-op time schedule than most of the rest of us were and have less time for the nervousness to work on you. The other great thing: you'll be recovering when the weather is warm and you can be outside.

Just FYI: that first week most likely will be rough. If you expect it, I think you will fair much better. Our recommendation here is to elevate and ice frequently with a cloth between your skin and the ice. These were my besties for the first few weeks. Take your pain meds on a regular schedule. You don't have to do much except walk a little bit every hour or so during the day (bathroom trips are pretty frequent those first couple of days and nights, so that kinda takes care of itself.) Get yourself a "nest" made up: a recliner or comfortable couch, etc. where you have your books, water, lip balm, remote control, etc, You'll be spending quite a bit of time there, so make it your own. Also don't be surprised if all those things you plan to do go by the wayside. That's normal because almost all of your energy will be going to healing your body. Have some very simple meals planned: from freezer to micro or oven are great. Soup and sandwiches work, too. You get the drift.

You will not be incapacitated! They will have you walking right after surgery and you will be cleared by PT before being discharged home. That being said, if you can, have someone there to help you at least that first couple of days. You can do it on your own but it takes more planning. You will be surprised at how much this surgery takes out of you those first couple of weeks or so. So a helpful caretaker is a Godsend.
Be
Each week gets better. Then you can start to see how it was all worth it. The healing journey begins next Tuesday and we will be walking it with you. Let us know how else we can help. Blessings!
I did it! Surgery on Tuesday went perfectly but I had a concerning drop in blood pressure in recovery. Down to 50/26 with HR of 38 at one point. I was in recovery for 4 hours while my poor husband was in the waiting room with not much info. Was then transferred to ICU for a few hours until it was all stabilized and eventually moved to the regular Ortho floor about 8 pm. Kind of a long day! But I was out of bed and on my feet doing my initial PT that evening. All good the next day ( yesterday) more PT and OT in the morning, discharged by 10 am and home by noon. Slept great last night, let the recovery begin!
 
@shibbard Brava! Now go on over to the recovery side of the hip section and start your recovery thread so we can cheer you on with this phase of your journey!
 

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