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Planning for work question

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by JaneyGS, Apr 11, 2012.

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  1. JaneyGS

    JaneyGS Junior Member

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    Hello all,

    Just wanted to ask how other people have planned the time off from work. I have recently started a new job so I'm keen to show my commitment to the job but I also know that I need to allow enough time to recover.

    How long do you typically get signed off for? I have the facility to work from home but I know that my employer will not be keen for me to do this if I am still signed off. Ideally I'd like to have x (not sure how many) weeks off without even logging on/taking phone calls and then a further y weeks doing a couple of hours a day and then full time from home and then back in the office.

    It would be good to know how others have managed as I need to have a conversation with my boss and set some expectations.

    Thanks for any advice

    Jane
  2. Jaycey

    Jaycey Moderator

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    Hi Jane, there is no "set" time off work but guidelines usually say 10 - 12 weeks off and then a Phased Return to Work. The main issues are allowing enough time for healing, building up stamina and your reaction to medication. Some people can work from home while on pain meds. I sure can't! :rolleyespink:

    Take a look at the thread on phased return and then you can have a good discussion with your new boss. Good luck!
  3. rider1960

    rider1960 Post-Grad

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    My hip surgery went well and I didn't have any complications.

    I took 8 weeks off work--desk job--and returned back full time. That was OK for the hip itself, but I still had problems sitting for that long of a period of time and had to get up frequently throughout the day to stretch and walk around. My brain definitely didn't want to be working that early--it's amazing how foggy one can get after a major operation and recovery like this.

    My first week back to work was very difficult. Next hip in June, I am going to try to take an additional 2 weeks off if I can afford to do so financially.

    If I could have worked part time or worked from home for a couple of hours then take a break--that kind of thing--I could have been back to work much sooner than 8 weeks. Full time was a stretch for me at 8 weeks, mostly because of sitting and concentrating.

    Dorothy
  4. Jyoti

    Jyoti Senior

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    Hi Janey,
    What I did was from reading the thread told my work I will need 12 weeks off. I was very lucky as my Manager accepted it without question. To be honest I needed it as it took me 8 weeks to get myself better and then the next 4 weeks allowed me to slowly resume some activities such as sitting, walking and driving etc. it is very tiring going back to work even if sedentary. Resting, icing and elevating is a must so you need the time to not worry about work. you need time to get better.

    When I went back I had a 4 week phased return to work which really helped and got me back in the swing of things.

    I really thought being younger would be easier in recovery but I have to say I found it emotionally and physically draining so make sure you tell your Boss this is major surgery and you need time to recuperate. You may look ok but your body is working overtime to get you better.
    Best wishes
    Jyoti
  5. Dingbat7

    Dingbat7 Senior

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    Our medical officer looked at a web site when I saw him and it said 6-8 weeks if no complications for a hip replacement , I can have 6mths sick in a 12mth period then I go onto half pay , a further 6mths and no pay , I have about 3mths before the half pay rule kicks in due to having two ops last year (May/Sept) , however it's at the discretion of the senior management and I have been told as some of my conditions the result of injuries at work it won't apply. I was also on 6hr days , three days a week so if I go back I will be back on those hours.

    It is all rather academic anyway as have been told permanently disabled from performing my work role by a independant medical examiner two weeks ago and maximum I can work is 30hrs per week, I have been put forward for ill health retirement . I should know if It has been approved in about a month so I may not be going back and will be retired whilst off recovering. I should add when I saw him he said if I was having both hips done and the knee he didn't expect me to be able to do much for the next year what with annual leave etc so pointless remaining.

    I was due to retire anyway in May 2013 so no big deal and the pension benefits are enhanced if medically retired ie indexed linked straight away , I also qualify for an injury award for my knee and a back injury whilst serving Queen and Country which have contributed to my disablement
  6. Rusty dmw

    Rusty dmw Junior Member

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    Hi Janey,
    As you can see there is a wide range of answers and I asked the same thing myself before hand. Because I did not want to create false expectations I arranged for up to 6 weeks off. I had the minimally invasive procedure and was pretty limited the first few days but by day 7 started to go a little stir crazy. Went to work half days on days 9 and 10. Worked five half days all of the third week. Then back full time since. My job is relatively sedentary many days so that helped too.
    Good Luck you will enjoy the new you!
    Don
  7. Dingbat7

    Dingbat7 Senior

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    Rusty

    I don't think the job itself is the problem if an office role once reasonably recovered , it's the travel there and back, you can't drive for a minimum of six weeks and public transport probably not an option, with people banging into you and no guarentee of a seat that's even before complying with the 90 degree rules .....
  8. rider1960

    rider1960 Post-Grad

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    My biggest problems were sitting in a straight chair (hurt where my muscles were cut) and getting my brain to focus for a long period of time. Sitting upright was very difficult for me even though I generally felt fine.

    Dorothy
  9. Rusty dmw

    Rusty dmw Junior Member

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    Hi Janey,
    I hope your discussion(s) with you supervisor have gone well. I completely understand the desire to make a good impression at a new job and applaud your foresight. Anything you can do to help frame the expectations i am sure will be appreciated.

    You did not mention if you were having one or two hips replaced as that can have an impact on recovery time etc. Everything I read ahead of my surgery prepared me for 6-8 weeks and that is what I had been preparing my clients for. As it turned out my surgery went well and recovery was much quicker than I expected. Although I continued with plenty of ice and acetominiphine (sp?), I was able to begin going up stairs without a cain or crutches by week two. The Dr cleared me to drive the second week.

    Not to say that all discomfort and pain were gone, but I did feel functional and certainly not fragile. Followed my precautions and at 7 weeks feel much better and stronger than before the surgery.

    Certainly you situation will have it's own timeline depending on the full spectrum of medical condition and surgical approach. However, I did want to through out there the possibility that you might feel well enough to phase back into work sooner than the 6-8 week time frame that is often quoted. Better to prep you employer for the potential longer time but keep you self open to recovering at the rate you can handle.

    Good luck and feel free to share your thoughts and ask any and all questions!

    Don
  10. Poppet

    Poppet Honourary Moderator

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    Hi Jane

    I was in a similar situation to you.. I had started a new job and within weeks was due to have surgery.

    I went back to work at 7 weeks on a phased return of three days a week for three weeks.

    I have an office job and found that I could not sit for more than 20-30 mins before I would have to stand and move a little. I made sure this protocol was written into my return to work plan.

    I did require a new office chair and a workstation assessment which was helpful.

    I also found that the energy drain was a big hurdle for me, so I made sure that I rested heaps in the evenings and weekends (still do actually)..

    There other thing I found was around mid afternoon I felt extremely sore and tired and as I identified the pattern of it occurring around 3:30pm each day, I took two paracetamol at 3pm to stay ahead of the pain and that really helped me a lot.

    Good luck, do you have a surgery date yet?
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