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Lump @ surgical site, revision?

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Recovery Area' started by Sofa King, Jul 12, 2008.

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  1. Sofa King

    Sofa King Member

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    I'm 4 weeks, 6 days now, (34 days) LTHR post op. I'm walking with a cane, and sleeping in a bed with a body pillow between legs, but when I wake up and walk, it feels like a lump or protrusion is trying to push out of my incision scar. (Posterior lateral incision). I haven't had much PT, due to miscommunications, bad weather, no ride, PT being on vacation, etc. I'm also constantly bending at the waist > than 90 degrees, (without much pain or pressure), and I sleep so deeply, I'm sure I'm crossing legs and turning in toes while asleep. If I push on the hip lightly, my surgical hip is still much larger, more tender, and doesn't feel anatomically correct as my R, or non surgical hip, and feels like a tennis ball sized bump is trying to get out. I sometime wonder if I've got a "revision", or a 'dislocation', and that femoral head is kinda floating around in there, but the pain never gets above a 4 or 5 at most, and I tell myself it's just swelling, healing, etc. My OS did one post op X-ray 10 days after, but I didn't have this pain/sensation until about 2 weeks ago, and no X-rays since. I assume if it REALLY WAS a 'REVISION', my pain would be much higher, and my mobility would be non-existent.
    Agreed? Thoughts?

    ~Dalton
  2. Josephine

    Josephine Forum Admin and Mother Hen Administrator

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    Yes, Dalton, you would know ALL about it when you put weight on it if it is a dislocation. (Revision is when they totally redo a hip! [​IMG])

    OK, so you haven't been too careful so far as the restrictions go, but remember, dislocation is a risk not an inevitability! And they're not all that common actually.


    Anyhoes, a dislocated hip is extremely painful. I very much doubt you even be able to attempt to put weight on it much less walk! Plus, the leg would be shortened and rolling outwards, especially when lying down, but you would be unable correct the position, it would be too painful to even try. It would also be too painful to attempt to sit up in bed (or on the sofa!).

    Pain would be felt in the hip, thigh and knee, persisting even at rest.
    There may also be pain or numbness along the entire length of the sciatic nerve should the dislocated head be pressing on it.

    In other words, my friend, you wouldn't be wondering about it! In all probability, the lump is scar tissue or perhaps just some localised swelling left over from the op.
  3. JudyS

    JudyS Alpha

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    Hey Dalton,
    As far as the lump near the incision. I have had some the largest being at the top of the incisionl. My pt told me from week 1 to do light cirlce massage to the areas. She would also do that when she came twice a week. I think it has helped. The incision is still tender, it seems the lumps have gone down. some days it hurts to much to do the massage, but overall it worked for me.
    I have really sharp, burning pain at the bottom of the incision and it keeps going down my leg. That is why I can not sleep on that side yet.

    Watch that bending until your doc says it is ok. You sure don't want a dislocation!!!
    Judy
  4. Josephine

    Josephine Forum Admin and Mother Hen Administrator

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    Dalton, I errored! The foot rolling outwards is when the hip is dislocated anteriorly and is what would occur in an anterior or lateral approach.

    Posterior approaches result in a posterior dislocation (surprise, surprise!) and so the leg would roll inwards like this. Besides which,
    it happens quite suddenly and you'd be aware of it clunking out of place.

    [​IMG]
  5. Sofa King

    Sofa King Member

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    Jo,

    Thank you! You more than answered my question; I suppose I knew that it couldn't possibly be a dislocation, otherwise, I'd surely know it by the pain and lack of mobility. My pain doesn't get above a 3 now, even after PT, and I have no trouble walking, getting in and out of bed, am off Rx meds, etc. I'm even sleeping in a fetal position again, on BOTH sides! I guess I just needed a second opinion and reinforcement. I'm still careful not to cross my legs, but I am bending at the waist often, stopped using the toilet extention, and with no notable pain. I feel certain that I'm healing quickly now, and my glutes and upper quad are tightening in.

    Judy,

    Thanks for the idea about massaging the incision; nobody suggested that before, and I'll try it. I'm sure now the pain I was feeling is just residual swelling.

    ~Dalton
  6. *gmac*

    *gmac* Member

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    Dalton-
    ...AND... is it more pronounced when you are laying down on the operated side? Remember driving a car and the slight g forces on it while turning? It's the three steps forward and one step backward thing. First time I tried sleeping on that side (on purpose) I freaked out. A month later it was more of a (oh this is an interesting feeling). Did they use staples or glue to seal ya back up? Mine they used glue and it really seems like the incision should be a little softer.
  7. *gmac*

    *gmac* Member

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    Dalton-
    Re-read your previous post again and had to let you know that I too retired the throne last week. I couldn't fit one of those chairs with legs in the space over the toilet. Got a spacer (bout 4" thick) that bolted between the bowl and seat. I agree it is one more step to normalcy. (Never thought I would be talking about my toilet with pride).
  8. JudyS

    JudyS Alpha

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    About the toilet. I still rely on the handles to sit down. I don't remember what it is like to not use a raised seat.
    Of course out in public I use my whizaway, which I love!!
    Judy
  9. Sofa King

    Sofa King Member

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    GMAC,

    I had PT today, and my PT said I'm healing in leaps and bounds. I'm setting the toilet extension out at the curb. I had sutchers (clear fishing line), and I'm sleeping in a fetal position again on both sides, with minimal pain @ at the incision. The only thing that still bothers me painwise is climbing stairs with my surgical leg 1st, and walking without a cane causes pain too, since my surgical leg is still 1/2 inch longer. I'm going to hit the pool this week, and next week see if I can have permission to start riding my mountain bike again. (Slowly, on flat surfaces, and short distances). I feel like I'm almost out of the woods, and will be ready to return to work by the end of the month. (Seated in Dispatch; I won't try to take on the Jail inmates til Thanksgiving or Christmas).

    Judy,

    What in the World, may I ask, is a "Whizaway"!?!? LOL Never heard of that...

    ~Dalton
  10. JudyS

    JudyS Alpha

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    Hey Dalton, I thought a picture was worth a thousand words
    Judy
  11. Josephine

    Josephine Forum Admin and Mother Hen Administrator

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    In other words, Dalton - you really don't want to know! [​IMG]
  12. *gmac*

    *gmac* Member

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    The first time you use your own cameoed it really makes you feel very good. It's just a personal achievement. I don't know how it rates in the bigger picture of life itself.

    (Just did a spell check before I posted; I guessed on cameoed but it knew about "whizaway". Life is good).
  13. 2hips

    2hips Junior Member

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    Dalton,
    I did have some large hard sore lumps also. Didn't really hurt but a sore and I was worried about what was going on. It was basically a tightness/soreness sensation.

    I been trying to remember back and seems that I remember the lumpiness being caused by the sutures as they would sometimes dissolved and lump up inside the incision area so to speak. I hope this makes sense and maybe Josephine will comment on this.

    I aslo had posterolateral approach/glued and dissolving sutures.

    Dr. added on an inch to left leg.
    All is good now.
    However I do understand that things can/will even out on their on.
    Deborah

    .
  14. Sofa King

    Sofa King Member

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    YEP JUDY, IT WAS WORTH 10,000 WORDS! LOL Never saw one of those before, but I guess I shouldn't, being a guy. I suppose it's a lifesaver when out and about, and still recovering!

    ~D.
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