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Crossing legs

Discussion in 'Hip Replacement Pre-Op Area' started by GrahamDee, Apr 14, 2012.

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  1. GrahamDee

    GrahamDee Senior

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    Another stupid question (from a long line of stupid questions)...

    When post-op, how do you stop yourself from crossing your legs?

    I habitually sit with crossed legs, usually my right bad leg over my left, which I find eases the constant ache. Obviously when I get this done, leg crossing is a big no-no. But I just know in the six weeks post op, I'm going to do it when I'm not thinking about it.

    Crossing whilst sleeping (or what will pass for sleeping) can be cured by pillows, but what about the rest of the time? Will I be forced not to cross by the pain of the surgery, or are there some other methods people have found and used? Is there something I can buy or make to prevent it?

    Apologies if this sounds really stupid or obvious, just a thought rattling around my head.


    T-Minus 66 Days 15Hrs 14 Mins.....:hate-shocked:
     
  2. Dingbat7

    Dingbat7 Senior

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    I have not been able to cross my legs for years due to a knackered knee and then hips, so my body doesn't automatically try doing it, to be honest never really did it when healthy. My default sitting position is with my legs about a 6inches apart , trying to close them hurts my hips

    Likewise usually sleep on my side with either a pillow or the duvet between my legs to ease the pain, will be an experience to sleep on my back .

    To be honest not sure if even after 6 weeks a good idea to cross your legs fully , I certainly won't be trying it

    T- 2 days 14hrs
     
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    • rider1960

      rider1960 Post-Grad

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      I had the posterior surgical approach and there was an area where the muscles and fascia were sutured back together that were very tender and a constant reminder not to do things like that. In fact any lateral movement of the leg was very painful at first. My biggest problem after surgery was remembering not to bend over too far because that didn't cause me any pain.

      If you don't have the post op pain as a reminder, you are just going to have to be very vigilant about thinking before you move. I did that--every move was thought out and I never rushed anything.

      Dorothy
       
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      • klalota

        klalota Junior Member

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        I used to be a habitual leg crosser, but the hip issue has mostly put a stop to it. I still sometimes cross my good leg over my bad, but not for long as it starts to hurt my bad leg. Also, it's not a mindless thing anymore: pretty much any movement of my legs leads to at least some kind of discomfort on my bad leg, so even crossing over my good one requires thought. After recuperation, say 6 months out, can you once again sit with legs crossed comfortably? I imagine this more of an issue for women.
         
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        • brit1chick

          brit1chick Member

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          I used to be a leg crosser too and I was frightened that I would do the same without thinking, but believe me your leg will feel too heavy and you will just not want to do it, even if you could.
          Even now, and I am way past the restriction stage, I still haven't crossed my operated leg over my other one. i suppose at some time in the future I will, and I could physically do it now if I wanted but I think its so much in your head not to, that it will take a while to do things that you weren't allowed to do without thinking.
           
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          • brit1chick

            brit1chick Member

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            actually thinking about it, I did cross my ankles a lot and even the day after my op i realised I was doing that when I was in bed. My good ankle over my bad one though, couldn't possibly have even lifted my leg in the first few days, but my physio said try not to do it, but its not the end of the world though, to disclocate you normally have to cross your legs and twist your body at the same time. So I wouldn't worry too much about it.
             
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            • DallasSarah

              DallasSarah Post-Grad

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              Hi Graham,

              This was one of my biggest fears crossing the legs, I would sit with my leg crossed over my other leg every night, legs either propped on bed or poof, It's not an issue at all, it's amazing how your body, new hip tells you what is good and what is not. I haven't crossedmy leg since before the surgery.

              All the best,

              Sarah
               
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              • haldox

                haldox Post-Grad

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                I agree with Sarah-your body will usually keep you in line and not let you do anything extreme while the hip is brand new.

                I was big on crossing legs pre op when the bad hips would let me. Also sitting curled up in the corner of the couch but there was none of that for over a month with the new hips. My hip wanted nothing to do with it until it was ready!

                I am back to crossing legs and sitting however I like.
                 
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                • GrahamDee

                  GrahamDee Senior

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                  Thanks to all those who took time to respond. My question appears to have been answered, I guess the proof of the pudding will be when its my turn and I'm home after surgery.



                  Countdown now down to 64 Days 17 Hrs 15 Mins....
                   
                • sharonslp

                  sharonslp Forum Advisor

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                  Yes indeed, Graham, once you get your hip done, you'll be astonished at how much all these concerns just fade away. In the early days, pain will prevent you from doing anything really bad. Once the pain starts to fade, and your flexibility begins to return, your internal censor will be on duty. The six weeks until the doctor lifts a lot of restrictions goes by pretty quickly....before you know it, there will come a day when you don't even think about your hip.

                  Sharon
                   
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